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Courses

This list provides a preview of the interesting Quest II courses in which you will explore ethical dilemmas.

Please Note: This list is designed to give you an idea of the types of courses that have been approved and may be offered in a given semester. Not all courses on this list will be offered each semester. For a complete and accurate list of courses offered, please check Titan Web.

Remember that all Quest courses are also Explore courses (Nature-XL, Culture-XC or Society-XS) and that each Quest II course is paired with either Quest Writing or Quest Speaking.  Be sure to choose a Quest II option that is paired with the course you did not encounter in Quest I (Writing or Speaking).

Students who have earned credit for both Writing and Speaking will have the option to take an unpaired (UP) Quest II course.  Honors students complete Quest II and III with Honors 275.

Sustainability (SUS)

How do people understand and create a more sustainable world?

Chemistry 103: Environmental Chemistry (XL)

This laboratory course will cover the chemistry of environmental topics such as: air pollution, ozone depletion, water pollution, acid rain, waste disposal and energy production. Occasionally tangentially related topics such as drug design and nutrition may be discussed.  This course may be combined with Chemistry 104, to form a two semester sequence for the Bachelor of Science degree.  NOTE: Chemistry 103 is not a prerequisite for higher level chemistry courses. Special fees may apply.

 

Chemistry 104: Introduction to the Chemistry of Materials (XL)

This laboratory course will teach the chemistry behind materials that society depends on: metals, ceramics, and polymers.  Historic and economic impacts of their manufacture and use will be considered.  Applications of advanced materials in fields such as electronics, aviation or art will be discussed.  This course may be combined with Chemistry 103 to form a two-semester sequence for the Bachelor of Science degree.  Note:  Chemistry 104 is not a prerequisite for higher level chemistry courses.

 

English 211: English Literature to the 18th Century (XC)

A study of English literature from its beginnings to 1800. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

 

English 226: Modern American Literature (XC)

A study of works by post-19th century American writers. Primarily for non-majors. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188) or English 101 or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

 

English 227: Modern World Literature (XC) (NW)

A study of works by modern world authors, in English or English translation. This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Recommended for non-majors. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188) or English 101 or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

 

English 247: Introduction to Shakespeare—A Quest for Ethics in Otherworlds of Play (XC)

Introduction to Shakespeare is a course for non-English majors. It will cover several of the best-known plays as such Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Hamlet, Much Ado About Nothing, Taming of the Shrew, and Henry IV. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

 

Philosophy 104: Ethics (XC)

Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Ethics 105 is the Non-Western Culture version of Ethics 104. Students cannot receive credit for both Philosophy 104 and 105.

 

Philosophy 109: Introduction to Philosophy (XC)

A survey of some of the perennial problems of the human enterprise; the nature of reality, of truth, of beauty, of ideal political and social relationships, and of the good life; solutions to these problems offered by the best known Greek, medieval, and modern philosophers.

 

History 101: Early Civilizations (XS)

Survey of development of civilizations, including beginnings in Mesopotamia and Egypt, through Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. (Fall-Spring)

 

Political Science 115: International Politics (XS)

Development of the nation-state system; role of the great powers; the struggle for power; settlement of disputes; diplomacy, the quest for law, nationalism, contemporary problems.

 

RELSTDS/WOM STDS 263: Women, Religion, Sustainability: From Green Nuns to Hindu Tree Huggers (XS) (ES)

We all live in bodies, and we all live on the planet Earth. This class explores how women from diverse religious traditions have approached the question of how to live sustainably on this planet, as well as how religious approaches to sustainability affect women's lives. We will assess this through units on four themes: 1) Wonder and Nature, 2) Food, 3) People and Bodies, and 4) Myth and Ritual. Cross-listed: Religious Studies 263/Women's and Gender Studies 263, students may receive credit for only one-cross listed course.

 

Civic Learning (CL)

How do people understand and engage in community life?

Biology 117: The Right and Wrong of Healthcare Science (XS)

Doctors (and other healthcare providers) are intimately involved in important decisions by nearly every person in the nation, even to life-or-death.  Patients are often so mystified or intimidated by medical matters that they become frozen in indecision, or “just leave it up to the doctor” to decide.  Some patients even reject medical care for “quack” remedies that do more harm than good.  This course will examine how medical professionals know what they know, including ethical reasoning processes that apply to other kinds of decision making. We’ll also investigate why some patients reject scientific, medical knowledge for other avenues of treatment, and how advertising can be used to mislead the gullible among the public.  You’ll discover that “a grain of salt” goes a long way, and it’s not “brain surgery”!

 

English 210: Classical and Medieval Literature (XC)

A study of the literature from antiquity to the Renaissance, which may include classical works of Greece, Rome, Britain, and continental Europe. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

 

English 211: British Literature I (XC)

A study of English literature from its beginnings to 1800. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

 

English 212: British Literature II (XC)

A study of English literature from 1800 to present. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

 

History 110: Topics in the History of Modern Civilization: Conformity and Resistance (XS)

Selected topics in the History of Modern Civilizations. It may be offered with different content.

 

History 202: Modern US History Since 1877: The Ethics of Democracy: Ethical Reasoning (XS)

Survey of United States history from 1877; emergence of a modern industrial state, expansion abroad, First and Second World Wars, and role as a great power. (Fall-Spring)

 

History 210: In our Time: The U.S. and the World Since 1978 (XS)

Selected topics in the Modern History of the United States. It may be offered with different content.

 

Music 110: Music, Ethics and Community (XC)

This course explores the ethical issues related to listening, appreciating , sharing, practicing, teaching, and thinking about music. How music is connected to identity and community will be researched. In this course, music is the instrument that is used to evaluate ethical theories and core beliefs while addressing concerns as they relate to self, community, culture, equality, personal values, the public good, civic traditions, and personal expression.

 

Philosophy 105: Ethics (XC) (NW)

Organization, principles and actual working of the American National Government in all its branches.

 

Political Science 105: American Government and Politics (XS)

Our government institutions, officials, and outputs create an environment which shapes our understanding of politics, opinions on issues, and even our political behavior.  In this class we will delve into the organization and principles that comprise the American National Government to gain a better understanding of its impact on our lives and connect with opportunities for civic engagement.

 

Intercultural Knowledge (IK)

How do people understand and bridge cultural differences?

African American Studies 101: Introduction to African American Studies (XC) (ES)

A survey of ideas, issues and traditions related over time to the experiences of people of black American ancestry in the United States.

 

Anthropology 232: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (XS) (NW)

Focusing on the concept of 'culture', the course discusses the aims, methods, and achievements of anthropological research and presents a general model for comprehending human society.

 

English 227: Modern World Literature (XC) (NW)

A study of works by modern world authors, in English or English translation. This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Recommended for non-majors. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188) or English 101 or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

 

History 105: Topics in the History of Early Civilization: Conquest and Indigenous Resistance (XS) (NW)

Selected topics in the History of Early Civilizations. It may be offered with different content.

 

Philosophy 105: Ethics (XC) (NW)

Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Ethics 105 is the Non-Western Culture version of Ethics 104. Students cannot receive credit for both Philosophy 104 and 105.

 

Political Science 101: Introduction to Comparative Politics (XS) (NW)

Provides an introduction to key concepts and issues in comparative politics in a variety of non-western and western country cases from Europe, Asia, the Americas, Africa, and the Middle East.  Major themes include political participation and institutions, role of government, political parties, democratization, economic development, political culture, nationalism and ethnic conflict.  More than fifty percent of the course content is devoted to non-western countries and their political realities.

 

Sociology 153: Intercultural Exploration of Families (XS) (ES)

This course examines the family system in the U.S. and across cultures, including the ways family structures both reinforce and challenge gender roles. Sociological and gender-based theories of the family are explored as well as the complex relationships among marriage, parenting, work, and family. Students will use ethical reasoning to navigate these relationships. Varieties of family experience are considered, with special attention given to issues concerning competing definitions of the family.

 

Theatre 152: Non-Western Theatre (XC) (NW)

A study of theatre outside the Euro-centric or Western tradition (to include African, Asian, and Indian, ritual, libation, dance, puppetry, masks, storytelling, etc.) which explores cultural differences and similarities in theatrical performance.

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