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UW Oshkosh

Mission of the University at UW Oshkosh.

UW Oshkosh

Organization:

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh is both a major undergraduate, a regional graduate and doctoral campus in the statewide University of Wisconsin System, which ranks among the top education systems in the nation; it is one of thirteen four-year campuses in the System. Control of the System rests with the state, a Board of Regents and an administrative head with the title of President. Each campus is administered under the leadership of a chancellor.

History:

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh has a long and distinguished academic history, having served Wisconsin since opening its doors as Oshkosh Normal School in 1871. Keeping abreast of educational trends, the school was designated Wisconsin State Teachers' College in 1925, and upon the approval of curricula in the liberal arts in 1949, became Wisconsin State College, Oshkosh. 

Recognizing the growth in enrollment and programs and the inauguration of several graduate degrees, the college was designated as Wisconsin State University Oshkosh in July of 1964. Upon the merger of the Wisconsin State University and University of Wisconsin systems, the campus became the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh in 1971.

The Campus: 

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh is located in the city of Oshkosh in the heart of the Fox River Valley. Situated in the near northwest section of the city, the modern campus of more than 50 buildings is arranged along a central mall and boulevard and bordered on the west by the Fox River.

University of Wisconsin System Mission Statement

The mission of the University of Wisconsin System is to develop human resources, to discover and disseminate knowledge, to extend knowledge and its application beyond the boundaries of its campuses, and to serve and stimulate society by developing in students heightened intellectual, cultural, and humane sensitivities, scientific, professional and technological expertise, and a sense of purpose. Inherent in this broad mission are methods of instruction, research, extended training and public service designed to educate people and improve the human condition. Basic to every purpose of the UW System is the search for truth.

The Core Mission of the University Cluster Institutions

As institutions in the University Cluster of the University of Wisconsin System, the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, the University of Wisconsin-Parkside, the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, the University of Wisconsin-Stout, the University of Wisconsin-Superior and the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater share the following core mission. Within the approved differentiation stated in their select missions, each university in the cluster shall:

  • Offer associate and baccalaureate degree level and selected graduate programs within the context of its approved mission statement.
  • Offer an environment that emphasizes teaching excellence and meets the educational and personal needs of students through effective teaching, academic advising, counseling and through university-sponsored cultural, recreational and extra-curricular programs.
  • Offer a core of liberal studies that supports university degrees in the arts, letters and sciences, as well as specialized professional/technical degrees at the associate and baccalaureate level.
  • Offer a program of pre-professional curricular offerings consistent with the university's mission.
  • Expect scholarly activity, including research, scholarship and creative endeavor, that supports its programs at the associate and baccalaureate degree level, its selected graduate programs and its approved mission statement.
  • Promote the integration of the extension function, assist the University of Wisconsin-Extension in meeting its responsibility for statewide coordination, and encourage faculty and staff participation in outreach activity.
  • Participate in inter-institutional relationships in order to maximize educational opportunity for the people of the state effectively and efficiently through the sharing of resources.
  • Serve the needs of women, minority, disadvantaged, disabled and non-traditional students and seek racial and ethnic diversification of the student body and the professional faculty and staff.
  • Support activities designed to promote the economic development of the state.

Select Mission of the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh provides a high-quality liberal education to all of its students in order to prepare them to become successful leaders in an increasingly diverse and global society. Our dedicated faculty and staff are committed to innovative teaching, research, economic development, entrepreneurship and community engagement to create a more sustainable future for Wisconsin and beyond. High quality academic programs in nursing, education, business, social sciences, natural sciences, humanities, fine and performing arts, engineering technology, information technology, health sciences and applied and liberal studies—all delivered in an innovative and inclusive learning environment—lead to degrees at the associate, baccalaureate, master’s and professional doctorate levels.

The UW Oshkosh Student Learning Outcomes

UW Oshkosh prepares graduates who are talented, liberally educated, technically skilled global citizens and are fully engaged as leaders and participants in civic, economic, political and social life. The University fulfills its learning mission through a commitment to providing a 21st century liberal education that is grounded in a set of student learning outcomes unanimously adopted by the Faculty Senate on May 13, 2008.
The University embraces the following definition of liberal education: 
Liberal education is a philosophy of education that empowers individuals with broad knowledge and transferable skills, and a strong sense of values, ethics and civic engagement. These broad goals have been enduring even as the courses and requirements that comprise a liberal education have changed over the years. Characterized by challenging encounters with important and relevant issues today and throughout history, a liberal education prepares graduates both for socially valued work and for civic leadership in their society. It usually includes a general education curriculum that provides broad exposure to multiple disciplines and ways of knowing, along with more in-depth study in at least one field or area of concentration.
[Source: Advocacy “What is a liberal education?”]

Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World

  • Through study in fine and performing arts, humanities, mathematics and science and social science, focused by engagement with big questions, both contemporary and enduring.

Skills, both Intellectual and Practical, including

  • Identification and objective evaluation of theories and assumptions.
  • Critical and creative thinking.
  • Written and oral communication.
  • Quantitative literacy.
  • Technology and information literacy.
  • Teamwork, leadership and problem solving practiced extensively, across the curriculum, in the context of progressively more challenging problems, projects and standards for performance.

Responsibility, as Individuals and Communities, including

  • Knowledge of sustainability and its applications.
  • Civic knowledge and engagement—local and global.
  • Intercultural knowledge and competence.
  • Ethical reasoning and action.
  • Foundations and skills for lifelong learning developed through real-world challenges and active involvement with diverse communities.

Learning: Integrated, Synthesized and Advanced, including

  • Synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies demonstrated through the application of knowledge, skills and responsibilities to new settings and complex problems. 

[Note: Learning Outcomes are adapted from AAC&U report, College Learning for a New Global Century [http://www.aacu.org/advocacy/leap/documents/GlobalCentury_final.pdf]] 

Vision

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh will be a research-enhanced comprehensive university built upon the ideals of a liberal education, inclusive excellence and shared governance that reinforces a nationally recognized emphasis on sustainability.

Values

1.  Student Success

2.  Inclusive Environment

3.  Sustainability

4.  Shared Governance

5.  Community Partnerships

6.  Creativity

7.  Workplace Joy

Strategic Priorities

Strategic Priority A Enhance Student Success

Strategic Priority B Promote Academic Excellence

Strategic Priority C Expand Community Engagement & Economic Development

Strategic Priority D Build an Inclusive and Supportive Institutional Environment

Administrative Leadership Principles

  • Maintain an open, inclusive, non-threatening environment
  • Embrace responsive shared governance
  • Treat people with respect and integrity
  • Encourage risk taking
  • Respect the ideas, roles and talents of all members of the team
  • Nurture, promote and integrate diversity of people and ideas
  • Preserve the ideals of altruistic leadership
  • Recognize, reward and celebrate success
  • Advocate for all aspects of the University
  • Empower and support others
  • Communicate honestly and constructively
  • Recognize our accountability to our internal and external constituencies
  • Listen carefully and respond clearly
  • Make decisions based on the priorities integral to the Governing Ideas of the University

Assessment of Student Learning 

The University's Assessment Plan calls for the collection and analysis of data of student learning in the University Studies Program (USP) and every major program. The purpose of the University Assessment Plan is to articulate learning outcome goals for the General Education program and every undergraduate major program and assess whether those learning outcome goals are being accomplished. The university employs multiple measures to determine if learning outcome goals are being accomplished.

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Volume Information

Undergraduate Bulletin, 2015 - 2017

Volume Information

Accredited by:

  • AACSB International -- The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
  • The Computer Science Emphasis of the Computer Science major is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.
  • Accreditation Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
  • American Chemical Society
  • Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care [AAALAC]
  • Commission for Collegiate Nursing Education [CCNE]
  • Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education [CAATE]
  • Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs [CACREP]
  • Council for Standards in Human Service Education [CSHSE]
  • Council on Social Work Education

Higher Learning Commission: A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools

  • National Association of Concurrent Enrollment Programs [NACEP]
  • National Association of Schools of Music [NASM]
  • Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Approved by:

  • Wisconsin State Board of Accountancy
  • Wisconsin State Board of Nursing

Member:

  • American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education [AACTE]
  • American Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN]
  • American Association of State Colleges and Universities [AASCU]
  • American Association for Curriculum Development [AACD]
  • American Council on Education [ACE]
  • American Geological Institute
  • American Historical Association
  • Association for the Advancement of Sustainability [AASHE]
  • Association of American Colleges & Universities [AAC&U]
  • Association of Department of Foreign Languages [ADFL]
  • Association of Environmental Health Academic Programs [AEHAP]
  • Association of Wisconsin Nurse Educators [ANEW]
  • College and University Professional Association [CUPA]
  • Council for Higher Education Accreditation [CHEA]
  • Council for Standards in Human Service Education [CSHSE]
  • Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences [CCAS]
  • Council on Undergraduate Research [CUR]
  • Mathematical Association of America
  • Midwest Modern Language Association [M/MLA]
  • Midwest Student Exchange
  • National Association of Colleges & Universities Business Officers [NACUBO]
  • National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
  • National League for Nursing [NLN]
  • National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties [NONPF]
  • National Rural Education Association [NREA]
  • National Strength and Conditioning Association
  • National Student Exchange [NSE]
  • National Women’s Studies Association
  • Northeast Wisconsin Educational Resource Alliance [NEW ERA]
  • NEW NORTH
  • Teacher Education Council of State Colleges and Universities [TECSCU]
  • The College Board
  • WAICU StudyWisconsin
  • Wisconsin Association of Colleges for Teacher Education [WACTE]
  • Wisconsin Campus Compact
  • Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies
  • Wisconsin Women in Higher Education Leadership

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Undergraduate Bulletin is published biennially in the spring of odd-numbered years. Bulletins are available online at http://www.uwosh.edu/registrar/bulletins

UW Oshkosh is registered as a public institution with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, sections 136A.61 to 136A.71.  Registration is not an endorsement of the institution.  Credits earned at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions.

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Vol. 35 No. 3 May 2015

Note to Readers

This Bulletin does not establish nor constitute a contract between the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and students enrolled at this institution. The Bulletin provides descriptive and summary information that outlines University rules, regulations, course listings, degree programs and fee schedules, which are in effect at the time of publication. The University retains the exclusive right to change, modify or interpret, at any time, the descriptions contained in this Bulletin. The University administration and faculty, with the concurrence of the Board of Regents and the administration of the University of Wisconsin System, also retain the right to change fees and to add, modify or withdraw courses or degree programs at any time.

Under the provision of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, a student is entitled to review any records, files, documents and other materials defined as education records that are maintained by UW Oshkosh and are related directly to the student. A student may contact the Student Affairs Office, Dempsey 148, for further information.

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh is committed to a policy of fairness and equal opportunity for all. A diverse student body, faculty and staff, which reflect the variety of pluralism of society, is desired and encouraged. Moreover, equal access to benefits, programs, services, employment and education opportunities is assured for all, without regard to sex, color, marital or parental status, race, age, national origin, religion, handicap, sexual preference, political affiliation or beliefs, and arrest or conviction record (except prescribed by law), ancestry, creed, or sexual orientation. Inquiries regarding University compliance with equal opportunity/affirmative action laws and regulations may be directed to the University Director of Affirmative Action, (920) 424-0330.

UW OSHKOSH
Winter Weather Advisory

(920) 424-0000

UW Oshkosh has an automated telephone line for timely information concerning class cancellations for winter weather-related conditions. Make note to call (920) 424-0000 for the latest information. Please note that the University only rarely suspends classes for weather-related conditions. Students should be aware that some faculty and instructional academic staff provide information specific to their courses (e.g., including such information as arrangements for making up any canceled sessions).

In addition to notifying radio and television stations, the University's official web site will also post notices of weather-related news.

Graduate Studies at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Students interested in furthering their education are encouraged to consider graduate studies at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. The master's degree programs, practice doctorates, certificates, post-master's programs and graduate courses available are fully described in the Graduate Studies Bulletin.

Also, undergraduate students who are certified by an undergraduate examiner to be within nine units (crs.) of graduation and who meet other Graduate Studies admission requirements may request permission to enroll in some graduate courses as a final term senior during the term in which their baccalaureate degree will be awarded.

Chemical Exposure

Certain courses and research projects require that students work with chemicals while engaging in academic studies. Many of these chemicals may be hazardous to your health. Instructors of these courses and research projects must inform and train students on procedures that will maintain the students' personal health and safety and provide them with information on the hazards of specific chemicals that will be used during their course of study. Furthermore, instructors must enforce and follow safety policies. Prior to use of hazardous materials and equipment, students shall review the procedures and information, and discuss any associated concerns with the instructor.
Contact: Greg Potratz
Phone: (920) 424-1488
On the Web: http://www.uwosh.edu/safety/index.html

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UW Oshkosh Calendar 2015-2017

UW Oshkosh Calendar 2015-2017

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh calendar makes it possible for students to choose the type and length of course they prefer. The 17-week fall and spring semesters are divided into terms of fourteen, seven and three weeks. The majority of courses are offered during a 14-week period, but many are held for double hours during the first seven weeks and some for double hours during the second seven. Intensive courses are offered during the last three weeks of the term. This calendar is designed to allow students more choice in selecting their schedules and to encourage the development of the participation in new educational alternatives. Students thereby enrich their total university experience with opportunities to take more courses in a term, if they wish to, and dramatically shorten the time required for graduation.

Among the special features designed into the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh calendar are:

  • Choices of courses offered for fourteen-, seven- or three-week periods within each total seventeen-week fall and spring term.
  • Choices as to the number of courses to carry at any one time and still take a full load, during either a fourteen-week or full seventeen-week period.
  • Choices to begin and finish courses at different times during the year to conform to work schedules, vacation plans, field studies or other personal preferences.
  • An additional feature permits enrollment in an eight-week or either of two, four-week summer terms.

TENTATIVE 2015-2017 CALENDAR

 

Fall Semester 2015

Day  
Month
  Date 
Action

Tuesday

 September

08

Faculty/Student Orientation & Academic Advisement/Registration

Wednesday

 September

09

Classes begin 14-week and 1st 7-week terms

Tuesday

 October

27

End of 1st 7-week term

Wednesday

 October

28

Classes begin 2nd 7-week term

Wednesday

 November

25

Thanksgiving recess
Note: Recess begins after evening classes on November 24.

Monday

 November

30

Classes resume

Friday

 December

18

End of 14- and 2nd 7-week terms

Saturday

 December

19

COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

*Monday

 January

04, 2016 

Classes begin 3-week Interim

Monday

 January

18

Legal holiday, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day - no classes

Friday

 January

22

End of 3-week and 17-week terms - Official Graduation Date

*Fall Interim, classes will meet January 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; 11, 12 , 13, 14, 15; 19, 20, 21, 22.

Spring Semester 2016

Day
Month
  Date  
 Action

Friday

January

29

 Faculty/Student Orientation & Academic Advisement/Registration

Monday

February

01

 Classes begin 14- and 1st 7-week terms

Friday

March

18

 End of 1st 7-week term

Sunday

March

20

 Spring recess begins

Monday

March

28

 Classes resume and 2nd 7-week classes begin

Friday

May

13

 End of 14- and 2nd 7-week term

Saturday

May

14

 COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

*Monday

May

16

 Classes begin 3-week Interim

Monday

May

30

 Legal holiday, Memorial Day - no classes

Friday

June

03

 End of 3-week and 17-week terms - Official Graduation Date

*Spring Interim, classes will meet May 16, 17, 18, 19, 20; 23, 24, 25, 26, 27; 31, June 1, 2, 3.   

Summer Session 2016

Day
  Month 
  Date 
 Action

Monday

June

13

 Classes begin 8-week and 1st 4-week

Monday

July

04

 Legal Holiday for July 4, Independence Day - no classes

Friday

July

08

 End of lst 4-week term

Monday

July

11

 Classes begin 2nd 4-week

Friday

August

05

 8-week and 2nd 4-week terms end - Official Graduation Date

Fall Semester 2016

Day
Month
 Date 
 Action

Tuesday

 September

06

 Faculty/Student Orientation & Academic Advisement/Registration

Wednesday

 September

07

 Classes begin 14- and 1st 7-week terms

Tuesday

 October

25

 End of 1st 7-week

Wednesday

 October

26

 Classes begin 2nd 7-week

Wednesday

 November

23

 Thanksgiving recess
 Note: Recess begins after evening classes on November 22.

Monday

 November

28

 Classes resume

Friday

 December

16

 End of 14- and 2nd 7-week terms

Saturday

 December

17

 COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

*Monday

 January

 3, 2017

 Classes begin 3-week term

Monday

January

16

 Legal holiday, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day - no classes

Friday

 January

20

 End of 3-week and 17-week terms - Official Graduation Date

*Fall Interim classes will meet January 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; 9, 10, 11, 12, 13; 17, 18, 19, 20. 

Spring Semester 2017

Day
Month
 Date 
 Action

Friday

 January

27

 Faculty/Student Orientation & Academic Advisement/Registration

Monday

 January

30

 Classes begin 14- and 1st 7-week terms

Friday

 March

17

 End of 1st 7-week term

Sunday

 March

19

 Spring recess begins

Monday

 March

27

 Classes resume and 2nd 7-week classes begin

Friday

 May

12

 End of 14- and 7-week term

Saturday

 May

13

 COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

*Monday

 May

15

 Classes begin 3-week term

Monday

 May

29

 Legal holiday, Memorial Day - no classes

Friday

 June

02

 End of 3-week and 17-week terms - Official Graduation Date

*Spring Interim: Classes will meet May 15, 16, 17, 18, 19; 22, 23, 24, 25, 26; 30, 31, June 1, 2.

Summer Session 2017

Day
Month
 Date 
 Action

Monday

 June

12

 Classes begin 8-week and 1st 4-week

Tuesday

 July

04

 Legal Holiday for July 4, Independence Day - no classes

Friday

 July

17

 End of lst 4-week term

Monday

 July

10

 Classes begin 2nd 4-week

Friday

 August

04

 8-week and 2nd 4-week terms end - Official Graduation Date

 

The Calendar is subject to change without notice. For current details, refer to the Academic Calendar that is linked to the Provost’s Web page - http://www.uwosh.edu/provost/

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Academic Administration

Board of Regents, UW System and UW Oshkosh Administrators

Board of Regents - University of Wisconsin System

Michael Falbo-President Hartland
Regina Millner-Vice President Madison
John R. Behling
Mark J. Bradley
Eau Claire
Wausau
Jose Delgardo Waukesha
Tony Evers Madison
Margaret Farrow
Eve Hall
Pewaukee
Milwaukee
Nicolas Harsy Madison
Tim Higgins Appleton
Edmund Manydeeds, III Eau Claire
Janice Mueller Madison
Drew Petersen Madison
Charles Pruitt Milwaukee
Anicka Purath Mount Pleasant
Jose F. Vasquez
David Walsh
Wauwatosa
Madison
Gerald Whitburn Wausau

University of Wisconsin System

Ray W. Cross                 President
David J. Ward     (Interim) Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Andrew J. Leavitt Chancellor
Lane R. Earns Provost and Vice Chancellor
Thomas Sonnleitner Vice Chancellor, Administrative Services
Petra Roter Vice Chancellor, Student Affairs
Arthur Rathjen President, UW Oshkosh Foundation
William Tallon Dean, College of Business
Frederick Yeo Dean, College of Education and Human Services
John Koker Dean, College of Letters and Science
Leslie Neal-Boylan Dean, College of Nursing
Jennifer Watson Associate Vice Chancellor, Faculty and Academic Staff Affairs
Carleen Vande Zande Associate Vice Chancellor, Curricular Affairs and Student Academic Achievement
Lori Worm Associate Vice Chancellor, Administrative Services
Karen Heikel Assistant Vice Chancellor, Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement
Sylvia Carey-Butler    Assistant Vice Chancellor, Academic Support and Inclusive Excellence
Anne Milkovich Assistant Vice Chancellor for Information Technology & Chief Information Officer
Jamie Ceman Assistant Vice Chancellor, Integrated Marketing and Communications
Sharon Kipetz  Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Engagement & Success/Dean of Students
Lisa Danielson Registrar
Jill Endries Director, Admissions
Liz Whalley Director, Advisement
Ameerah McBride Director, Equity and Affirmative Action
Kim Donat Director, Financial Aid
Patrick Wilkinson Director, Library
Susan Cramer    Dean, Graduate Studies
Gregory Wypisznyski    Director, Graduate Studies
                                         

 

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Admission/Degree Policies

Admissions Policies, Degrees and Areas of Study, Degree Requirements, Courses, Grades and Academic Standards and Courses and Academic Policies

 

I.  ADMISSION POLICIES

 (for undergraduate first-year students, re-entry students, transfer students and special students)

A. Admission for First-Year Students

A first year student is one who has not earned any transferable college credit after high school graduation. (an applicant who earns college transferable credit while simultaneously enrolled as a high school student is considered a first-year student.) Students may apply for admission for the fall term starting on September 15th during the year prior to the desired fall term for entrance. High school seniors and others are encouraged to apply during the fall term or as early as possible after that time. Applications will be accepted until the first-year class is full or until the start of the fall term whichever comes sooner. Late applications will be processed only as time and space allow.

1. Steps for admission (steps and fees subject to change upon University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents)

a.  Application-All applicants must submit the UW System application available at https://apply.wisconsin.edu. Use of the on-line application is highly encouraged, but a paper application may be downloaded and printed from the on-line application site.

b. High School Transcript or GED/HSED test scores-All applicants must submit official high school transcripts.  In the event that the applicant has successfully completed the Graduation Equivalency Diploma (GED) or High School Equivalency Diploma (HSED), a copy of the test scores and official copies of any partial high school transcripts must also be submitted.  Home school students must submit official transcripts from all home school and traditional high schools attended.

c. ACT/SAT I test scores-All upcoming and recent high school graduates must submit their ACT (American College Testing Program) or SAT I (College Board) test results.  There is no preference given to either testing instrument.  In addition to the 5 national ACT test dates given once in October, December, February, April and June, individuals may also take the ACT exam at the UW Oshkosh testing center during the other months.  To contact the UW Oshkosh testing center call 920-424-1432.

d. $44 application fee-All applicants applying as a first-year, degree-seeking student must submit a $44 application fee.  The fee may be waived for applicants with demonstrated financial need. (e.g. Applicant qualifies for free or reduced lunch program or, in the case of nontraditional students, provides verification of unemployment, or an official letter or form from a support organization such as Workforce Development, DVR, or Social Services illustrating financial need.)

2.  Admission guidelines (guidelines subject to change on an annual basis)

The Admission Decision

Applicants for admission are provided a comprehensive review. Determinants for admission include a number of academic and non-academic factors. Among the academic factors considered are a rigorous college preparatory curriculum that includes and ideally exceeds the minimum course preparation outlined below, cumulative grade point average, college preparatory grade point average, high school class rank and test scores for either the ACT or the SAT. Nonacademic factors (particularly relevant for non-traditionally aged applicants) include, but are not limited to, leadership experiences, community service, motivation and life circumstances that will positively contribute to the University’s strength and reflect its mission and values. Applicants are encouraged to provide documentation that supports consideration for admission, including their own personal statement and letters of recommendation from individuals who can speak directly to the applicant’s ability to succeed academically.

Academic Factors 

Academic preparation and, in particular, the strength of the college preparatory coursework, are important components of any admissions decision. The course requirements listed below represent the minimum distribution expected. Most applicants will exceed this distribution.

  • English  
4 units
  • Social Science
3 units
  • Mathematics
3 units  (Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra 2)
  • Natural Science   
3 units
  • Additional Academic Electives
4 units (additional courses from above or foreign language or fine arts or computer science)

UW Oshkosh Profile of Admitted Freshmen (2012)

The following information provides a profile for admitted freshmen from 2012. Applicants may wish to use this as a benchmark to estimate the likelihood of admission. Since all applications are given a comprehensive review that takes into consideration factors already noted, the data should not be interpreted as a guarantee of admission or prediction for denial.

The information below profiles the middle 50% range, so 25% of admitted freshmen are above this range and 25% are below

Criteria                                   Middle 50%
Class rank                              Top 17-43%
Graduating GPA                    3.06-3.75 
ACT Composite Score           21-24

3. Project Success

Some applicants may be eligible for admission to the University’s Project Success program. Project Success is a program for students with language-based learning disabilities attending the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Currently the program serves nearly 400 students who come from Wisconsin, the Midwest, and from as far away as New York, California and foreign countries to enter the program. 

There is no charge for Project Success services during the academic year above and beyond the student's normal tuition. For more information about Project Success and admissions guidelines please visit www.uwosh.edu/success.

4. Important follow up steps to admission

  • Enrollment deposit—To secure a spot in the first-year student class, an admitted student must submit a $100 enrollment deposit that is a credit toward the student’s first term tuition. At the time the deposit is submitted, the admitted student also selects a class registration and orientation date. More information about this process is provided in the admission packet.

  • Financial Aid—All students are encouraged to apply for financial aid. The only application necessary is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) available at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The UW Oshkosh priority-filing date is March 15th prior to the start of the fall term. However, students may file at any time and financial aid will be awarded to eligible students as long as funding is available. In order to submit the application, the student/parents must have filed the previous year’s federal income tax forms.

  • Placement testing—All first-year admits must complete the UW System placement testing for English and math prior to scheduling classes. Testing for foreign language placement is optional. Information on the testing sites, dates, registration and policies is available in February prior to the fall term.

  • Housing— Admitted students who have submitted the $100 enrollment deposit will be eligible to enter the online housing portal to search for a compatible roommate. All first-year students are guaranteed on-campus, residence hall housing. UW Oshkosh complies with the Board of Regents Housing Policy which states: “those freshmen and sophomore students who are not veterans, married or living with parents or legal guardians shall be required to live in a University-operated residence hall when such accommodations are available.”  Students who have reached the age of 21 prior to the first day of classes are exempt. A $150 housing pre-payment and housing contract must be submitted to reserve a residence hall room. The deposit is refundable (less a $25.00 administrative fee) with a written cancellation notice provided no later than June 15.

B. Admission for Re-entry Students

Any student who has previously enrolled at the UW Oshkosh but has not been enrolled during the most recent term, must apply for re-entry admission to the University to activate their student record. 

1. Re-entry student categories

Re-entry applicants will fall into 1 of 3 categories including re-entry, re-entry from suspension, and transfer re-entry.

  • Re-entry students are those who left the University in good academic and disciplinary standing and attended no other college or university following withdrawal from UW Oshkosh. An application may be submitted on-line at www.apply.wisconsin.edu or by requesting a paper application available in the UW Oshkosh Admissions Office, Dempsey Hall 135. No application fee is required.

  • Re-entry from suspension students are those who were suspended from the University due to poor academic performance.  An application may be submitted on-line at https://apply.wisconsin.edu or by requesting a paper application available in the UW Oshkosh Admissions Office, Dempsey Hall 135.  In addition, re-entry from suspension applicants must also submit a suspension appeals form and supporting documents.  The appeals form is available in the admissions office.  No application fee is required.

  • Transfer-re-entry students are those who left UW Oshkosh, earned college credit elsewhere at one or more colleges or universities after leaving UW Oshkosh, and now wish to return to UW Oshkosh. In addition to the application form, the applicant must submit official transcripts from all institutions attended since last enrolled at UW Oshkosh. No application fee is required. 

2. Steps for re-entry admission

  •  Enrollment deposit—A $100 enrollment deposit is required in order to be assigned a class registration date.  The deposit is a credit applied to the first term tuition.  It is refundable with a written cancellation notice received no later than July 1 for the fall term and December 1 for the spring term.

  • Class registration—Re-entry students are assigned a class registration date comparable to their continuing student counterparts who have earned a similar number of credits. Class registration is done on-line using Titan Web from any location.

  • Academic Advising—Although re-entry students are not required to meet with an academic advisor, unless they were readmitted from suspension, it is critical that students who are basing their current degree status on academic courses taken more than 10 years ago do so. The advisor will be able to 1) determine if the content of prerequisite courses or required courses in the major have changed enough that they do not meet current requirements, and 2) help the student identify how to meet the current requirements. These steps allow the student to be successful in upper-level courses and in working in a profession. Information about academic advising for re-entry students is provided at the time of admission. 

  • Financial Aid—All students are encouraged to apply for financial aid.  The only application necessary is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) available at www.fafsa.ed.gov.  The UW Oshkosh priority-filing date is March 15th prior to the start of the fall term.  However, students may file at any time and financial aid will be awarded to eligible students as long as funding is available.  In order to submit the FAFSA application, the student/parents must have filed the previous year’s federal income tax forms.

  • Housing— Admitted students who have submitted the $100 enrollment deposit will be eligible to enter the online housing portal to search for a compatible roommate. The University makes every effort to provide on-campus, residence hall housing for all admitted students. UW Oshkosh complies with the Board of Regents Housing Policy which states: “those freshmen and sophomore students who are not veterans, married or living with parents or legal guardians shall be required to live in a University-operated residence hall when such accommodations are available.” Students who have reached the age of 21 prior to the first day of classes are exempt. A $150 housing pre-payment and housing contract must be submitted to reserve a residence hall room. The deposit is refundable (less a $25.00 administrative fee) with a written cancellation notice provided no later than June 15.  

C. Admission for Transfer Students

Any student who has earned college or university credit from another institution after high school graduation must apply as a transfer student.  Post-secondary institutions include two and four year colleges and universities as well as technical colleges. Students may apply for admission for the fall term starting on September 15th during the year prior to the desired fall term for entrance. Students may apply for the spring term starting on July 1 during the year prior to the desired spring term for entrance. Applications will be accepted until the transfer class is full or until the start of the term whichever comes sooner. Applications received less than two weeks prior to the start of the term will be processed as time and space allow.

1. Steps for transfer admission (steps and fees subject to change upon University of Wisconsin Board System Board of Regents)

a. Application-All applicants must submit the UW System application available at https://apply.wisconsin.edu. Use of the on-line application is highly encouraged, but paper applications are available by downloading and printing the on-line version. 
b. Official college transcripts-All applicants must submit official college transcripts from all colleges or universities previously attended.
c. High School Transcript or GED/HSED test scores-In the event that the applicant has not completed a minimum of 30 transferable college credits, he/she must submit official high school transcripts. 
d. $44 application fee-All applicants except those transferring directly from a two-year UW System College are required to pay a $44 application fee. 

2. Admission guidelines (guidelines subject to change on an annual basis)

The Admission Decision for Transfer Students

Transfer applicants for admission are provided a comprehensive review. Determinants for admission include a number of academic and non-academic factors. Academic factors for admission include the academic rigor of the completed college courses, the earned number of college transfer credits, individual course grades and the collegiate cumulative grade point average. A transfer applicant’s high school academic record, including curriculum, GPA, class rank and ACT or SAT score will also be considered when less than 30 semester transfer credits have been earned at the time of application.   Applicants must have a minimum cumulative college GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale for transferable credits to be considered.  A cumulative 2.5 GPA or greater is preferred. Nonacademic factors include, but are not limited to, leadership experiences, community service, motivation and life circumstances that will positively contribute to the University’s strength and reflect its mission and values. Applicants are encouraged to provide documentation that supports consideration for admission, including their own personal statement and letters of recommendation from individuals who can speak directly to the applicant’s ability to be academically successful.

Admission to UW Oshkosh Professional Colleges and Programs

The application to UW Oshkosh is an application for admission to the University. It does not serve as application or admission to a professional college or program that has separate and distinct admission procedures. Since admission to many UW Oshkosh programs requires a second admission process based often times on college grades, particular attention will be given to a transfer applicant's college cumulative GPA, the trend of college grades, earned number of transfer credits, desired major and rigor of coursework.

3. Key dates and admission steps

  • Enrollment deposit—To secure a spot in the transfer student class, an admitted student must submit a $100 enrollment deposit that is a credit toward the student’s first term tuition. At the time the deposit is submitted, the admitted student is assigned a class registration date that is based upon the cumulative number of college credits earned at the time of admission. The class registration date will coincide with that of UW Oshkosh continuing students who have earned a similar number of credits. Registration for classes is done on-line using Titan Web.

  • Academic Advising-Students are encouraged to secure an academic advising appointment following admission. Although academic advising is not required of all students, it is required for certain majors and is highly recommended for all. Advising is also critical for students with courses taken more than 10 years ago. The advisor will be able to 1) determine if the content of prerequisite courses or required courses in the major have changed enough that they do not meet current requirements, and 2) help the student identify how to meet the current requirements. These steps allow the student to be successful in upper-level courses and in working in a profession. Information about academic advising options is provided at the time of admission. The student may also request a transfer credit report, an evaluation of transfer credits.

  • Financial Aid—All students are encouraged to apply for financial aid. The only application necessary is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) available at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The UW Oshkosh priority-filing date is March 15th prior to the start of the fall term. However, students may file at any time and financial aid will be awarded to eligible students as long as funding is available. In order to submit the application, the student/parents must have filed the previous year’s federal income tax forms.

  • Placement testing—Any admitted transfer student who has not already completed a college level English composition and math class and who has not previously taken the UW System math and English placement tests will be required to do so before enrolling in a math or English course. Placement testing for foreign language is optional.

  • Housing—admitted students who have submitted the $100 enrollment deposit will be eligible to enter the online Housing portal to search for a compatible roommate. The University makes every effort to provide on-campus, residence hall housing for all admitted students. UW Oshkosh complies with the Board of Regents Housing Policy which states: “those freshmen and sophomore students who are not veterans, married or living with parents or legal guardians shall be required to live in a University-operated residence hall when such accommodations are available.” Students who have reached the age of 21 prior to the first day of classes are exempt. A $150 housing pre-payment and housing contract must be submitted to reserve a residence hall room. The deposit is refundable (less a $25.00 administrative fee) with a written cancellation notice provided no later than June 15. 

4. Transfer of credits

Units/credits earned at other accredited colleges and universities are evaluated on the basis of official transcripts submitted as part of the admissions credentials.  Course equivalencies are posted to the student’s permanent academic record.  Posted transfer courses may not meet specific major and degree requirements at UW Oshkosh.  The professional college or the department housing the intended UW Oshkosh major determines how courses accepted in transfer apply to the degree and program requirements.  Students transferring within the UW System are able to view transferable course equivalencies by utilizing the UW System Transfer Information System (TIS) on-line at www.uwsa.edu/tis.  All UW System institutions and the Wisconsin Technical College institutions provide course-by-course detail on this web site. 

Grades for courses transferred to UW Oshkosh are not used in calculating the student’s official UW Oshkosh grade point average. However, transfer course grades do appear on the transcript and may be used by the professional colleges and departments in determining admissibility into specific programs and majors. 

The UW Oshkosh GPA will be calculated using only UW Oshkosh credits earned.  For various university level honors designations students must earn at least 60 credits at UW Oshkosh and only those grades are considered. 

Students who have completed an Associate of Arts and Science degree at a University of Wisconsin two-year UW College, or an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree through a Wisconsin Technical College System Liberal Arts program, may transfer to UW Oshkosh and receive credit for having met most University Studies Program (general education) requirements. UW College transfer students should utilize transfer guides posted on the Admissions Office web site at: http://admissions.uwosh.edu/transfers/ to determine general education requirements fulfilled by completion of the AAS degree. A maximum of 72 units/credits may be transferred to UW Oshkosh from any accredited two-year college.

Upon being admitted, transfer students may request a transfer credit report.  The credit evaluation will provide UW Oshkosh equivalency data for all transferred courses. Upon submitting the $100 enrollment deposit students will be able to access their STudent Academic Report (STAR), a degree audit that shows how the transferred credits apply toward the particular program and degree requirements.

Students should contact the Associate Director of Admissions at 920-424-0404 or via email at transfer@uwosh.edu, with questions about transfer of credits or to receive information to appeal a credit transfer decision.

In general, credits earned at non-accredited institutions do not transfer or apply toward program or degree requirements at UW Oshkosh.  However, the student may appeal this on a course-by-course basis to the department housing the intended major.  Students may also receive credit by examination (CLEP).  Information about CLEP may be obtained from the Testing Center in Polk Library 3, 920-424-1401.

5. UW System/Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS) Uniform Policy Statement on Unit/Credit Transfer

Students enrolled at a WTCS campus who wish to continue their education in the University of Wisconsin System may be eligible to transfer units/credits toward their bachelor’s degree in the following ways:

  • UW Oshkosh will transfer approved University Studies Program (general education) course work (communications, behavioral sciences, social sciences, mathematics, and natural sciences) from WTCS Applied Associate degree programs.

  • In some cases, UW Oshkosh may also accept occupational/technical courses from specific WTCS associate degree programs. It is a good idea to be aware of transfer agreements, requirements, and policies. As a potential transfer student, you should consult advisers and admission staff well before the intended semester of transfer.

  • The Bachelor of Applied Studies degree program in Leadership and Organizational Studies at UW Oshkosh recognizes in transfer most WTCS Applied Associate degrees. For information on these specific degree programs see: http://www.uwosh.edu/llce/cnl/programs/bas-los.

  • Students transferring from the WTCS may be eligible for credit by earning appropriate scores on national standardized examinations; e.g. College Level Examination Program (CLEP).

  • UW Oshkosh generally will not grant unit/credit for technical college courses taken before January 1990. Students may request exceptions through the appropriate Assistant Director of academic advising.

D. Admission of Non-Degree Seeking Students

Students not seeking to earn a baccalaureate degree at the time of enrollment in undergraduate course work are known as special students.  Special students fall into a variety of different categories and circumstances including the following:

  • Persons who have earned a baccalaureate degree but are not seeking a second degree or certification.

  • Persons who have graduated from high school but are not seeking a degree.

  • High school students who are participants in the Cooperative Academic Partnership Program (CAPP).

  • High school students who are involved in the Youth Options Program (YOP).

  • Other high school students who meet certain admissions eligibility requirements and have permission from their school district to enroll at UW Oshkosh as a high school special on campus.

1. Steps for non-degree special students

  • Application—All applicants must submit the UW System application available at https://apply.wisconsin.edu. Use of the on-line application is highly encouraged, but a paper application may be requested from the UW Oshkosh Admissions Office (Dempsey Hall 135) or by downloading and printing the on-line version.

  • Application fee—No application fee is required.

  • Transcripts—Students concurrently enrolled in high school at the time of application must provide official high school transcripts. Other applicants may be required to provide transcripts and in some cases, ACT/SAT test scores upon submitting the application. The Admissions Office will request transcripts when they are needed.

2. Key dates and admission steps

The admissions notification will contain information regarding class registration.

  • Special students are eligible to register shortly before the beginning of the intended term of enrollment only after all continuing and degree seeking students are eligible to do so.

  • Special students are not eligible for financial aid, cannot participate in intercollegiate athletics and are not entitled to academic advising. 

  • Special students may live in University owned residence halls.

  • Special students must re-apply for each term of enrollment. Admission is granted to special students on a term-by-term basis.

E. Academic Amnesty

Under this policy prior grades may be excluded from the computation of a student’s official cumulative grade point average.

  • Transfer, re-entry, or transfer/re-entry students seeking admission or readmission to UW Oshkosh who have not earned a baccalaureate degree may be eligible for exclusion of grades, not credits or courses, earned five or more years prior to their current term of admission as a degree seeking student.  This policy does not apply to graduate programs.

  • If a student is not eligible for admission to the University with her/his incoming GPA, the student may make formal written application to an Admissions Standards Consideration Team (ASCT) to invoke Academic Amnesty.  The ASCT consists of a faculty member, an admissions officer, an academic advisor, and a Dean. The student needs to provide reasons for previous performance and information about current educational plans.  The ASCT will assess the student’s record and application and consult with the student to determine the course of action.

Students who are admissible to the University are eligible to apply for application of this policy no later than the end of their first semester at UW Oshkosh.

A student can apply for and receive Academic Amnesty only once. The decision of the ASCT is final.  There is no appeal process.

If Academic Amnesty is granted, all courses and grades taken during an identified academic term(s) five years before admission/readmission will continue to appear on the student’s record.  If multiple terms are included in the granting of academic amnesty, the terms must be continuous.  If granted, the grades of all classes in that term(s) will be excluded in the official GPA.  The computation of the student’s official cumulative GPA will not include the excluded grades. Credit hours earned with a .67 (D-) or better may be used to satisfy degree requirements, even though they are not included in the student’s official GPA.  Academic Amnesty does not adjust the GPA and number of credits attempted and counted toward Satisfactory Academic Progress for financial aid.

Academic Amnesty applies to admission to the University, not to particular programs.  The colleges retain ultimate authority to determine admission to the college.  Likewise, colleges retain the right to limit the number of repeated courses.  If, after the successful granting of an Academic Amnesty application, a student achieves eligibility for admission to a program, a college cannot reject the student’s eligibility for admission.

All other University policies (for example, UW Oshkosh Repeat Policy) remain in effect and are not changed by the Academic Amnesty policy.  Only the official GPA will be considered for eligibility for graduation honors.

II. DEGREES AND AREAS OF STUDY

The following degrees, majors (with emphases) and minors are offered at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh:

A. Associate of Arts and Science Degree

The Associate of Arts and Science Degree is awarded in recognition of successful completion of the following requirements:

1.  A minimum of 60 units (crs.)

  • At least 30 of the 60 term units (crs.) applied to the degree must be earned in University of Wisconsin Oshkosh courses

  • At least 15 of the last 30 term units (crs.) must be earned in University of Wisconsin Oshkosh courses.

2.  2.0 official grade point average

3.  Course work selected from the approved University Studies Program (USP) course list to include:

  • 6 units/credits of writing
    • 3 units (crs.) of entry level writing selected from: English 101, 110, 111, Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS) 188.

    • 3 units/credits of upper level writing courses (Connect XK) selected from: English 300, 310, 312.

  • 3 units (crs.) of speaking: Communication 111

  • 9 units (crs.) of Culture (XC) course work must be selected.  
    • One course must be an approved USP English Literature course. 
    • Other culture options include art, music, theatre, communication, foreign language, philosophy, religious studies, etc.
  • 11 units (crs.) of Nature must be selected.  
    • 3 units (crs.) must be an approved USP Math (XM) course selected from: Problem Based Inquiry Seminar (PBIS) 187, 188, 189 or Math 109 or completion of approved higher level mathematics course.
    • 8 units (crs.) must be approved USP Lab Science (XL) courses. 
    • Lab science options include anthropology, biology, chemistry, geography, geology, physics and astronomy.
  • 9 units (crs.) of Society (XS) must be selected.  
    • 3 units (crs.) must be an approved USP History course.
    • Other society options include anthropology, economics, environmental studies, geography, political science, psychology, sociology, women's and gender studies.
  • 3 units (crs.) of Non-Western Culture (NW) selected from courses designated as "(NW)". Starting fall 2016, Global Citizenship (GC) will replace Non-Western.
  • 3 units (crs.) of Ethnic Studies (ES) selected from courses designated as "(ES)".
4. Elective courses to complete the 60 credit minimum.

B. Bachelor’s Degree

The Bachelor’s Degree is awarded in recognition of successful completion of a minimum of 120 units (crs.) of undergraduate university work and ordinarily is completed in four years. The following degrees are awarded:

Bachelor of Applied Studies (BAS)
Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)
Bachelor of Liberal Studies (BLS)
Bachelor of Music (BM)
Bachelor of Music Education (BME)
Bachelor of Science (BS)
Bachelor of Science in Education (BSE)
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)
Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)

The following major and minor areas of study are available in conjunction with the various Bachelor’s Degrees.

C. Majors (and Emphases)

Majors (and Emphases)

Degree
Anthropology BA/BS
Art (Also see Fine Arts) (Studio Art) BA/BS
Athletic Training BS
Art BA/BS/BFA
  • (2-D Studio)
  • (3-D Studio)
  • Design
  • Art Education
 
Biology BA/BS/BSE
  • (Cell/Molecular)
  • (Ecology and Organismal)
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Secondary Education)
  • (Healthcare-Business)
  • (Healthcare-Science)
Business, College of
Accounting BBA
Economics BBA
Finance BBA
Human Resources Management BBA
Information Systems BBA
Interactive Web Management BBA
Management BBA
Marketing BBA
Supply Chain Management BBA
  • (Business Analytics)
  • (Computer Science)
  • (Cost Management)
  • (Enterprise Systems Technology Management)
  • (Entrepreneurship)
  • (Financial Services)
  • (Healthcare Management)
  • (Human Resource Management)
  • (Information Management)
  • (Insurance)
  • (International Management)
  • (Legal Studies)
  • (Supply Chain Management)
  • (Real Estate)
  • (Retail Management)
  • (Sales)
  • (Supply Chain Management)
  • (Tax Planning)
  • (Web and Mobile Development)
  • (Web Presence Management)
Chemistry BS/BSE
  • (Professional)
  • (Secondary Education)
  • (Biochemistry)
  • (Biomolecular)
 
Communication Studies BA/BS/BSE
  • (Speech Communication Education)
 
Computer Science BA/BS
  • (Computer Science)
  • (Software Engineering)
 
Criminal Justice BA/BS
Economics BA/BS
  • (General)
  • (International)
  • (Quantitative)
Elementary Education
Elementary/Special Education (Dual)
BSE
BSE
Engineering Technology
BS
  • Electrical Engineering Technology
  • Environmental Engineering Technology
  • Mechanical Engineering Technology
English BA/BS/BSE
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Secondary Education)
 
English as a Second Language (ESL) BSE
Environmental Health BA/BS
Environmental Studies BA/BS
  • (Environmental Policy and Values)
  • (Environmental Science)
 
Fine Arts BFA
  • (2-D Studio)
  • (3-D Studio)
  • (Design)
  • (Art Education)
 
Fire and Emergency Response Management BAS
French BA/BS/BSE
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Secondary Education)
 
Geography BA/BS/BSE
Geology BA/BS/BSE
  • (Professional-Geology)
  • (Hydrogeology)
  • (Earth Science-Secondary Education)
  • (Liberal Arts)
 
German BA/BS/BSE
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Secondary Education)
 
History BA/BS/BSE
Human Services Leadership BS
Individually Planned BA/BS
Interactive Web Management  BBA, BA, BS
International Studies BA/BS
  • (General International Studies)
  • (International Business)
  • (International Development)
  • Global and National Security)
 
Japanese Studies (Collaborative) BA
Journalism BA/BS
  • (Advertising)
  • (Media Studies)
  • (Visual Journalism)
  • (Writing/Editing)
Kinesiology BS
  • (Exercise and Fitness)  
  • (Healthcare-Science) 
  • (Strength and Conditioning)  
 
Leadership and Organizational Studies BAS
Liberal Studies BLS
  • (Organizational Administration)
  • (Aviation Management)
 
Mathematics

BA/BS/BSE

  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Secondary Education)
  • (Statistics)

 

Medical Technology BS
Microbiology BA/BS
Music BA/BM/BS
  • (Composition)
  • (Instrumental Performance)
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Music Industry)
  • (Piano Performance)
  • (Recording Technology)
  • (Vocal Performance)
 
Music Education BME
  • (Choral)
  • (General Music)
  • (Instrumental)
 
Natural Science-Secondary Education BSE
Nursing BSN
  • (Accelerated Nursing Program)
  • (Collaborative Nursing Program)
  • (Traditional Nursing Program)
 
Philosophy BA/BS
Physics BS/BSE
  • (Applied)
  • (Astronomy)
  • (Physics/Engineering Dual)
  • (Professional)
  • (Secondary Education)
 
Physical Education BSE
Political Science BA/BS
  • (Civic Engagement)
Psychology BA/BS
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Healthcare-Business)
  • (Healthcare-Science)
 
Public Relations BA/BS
Radio-Television-Film BA/BS
Radiologic Science BS
Religious Studies BA/BS
Social Science-Secondary Education BSE
Social Work BSW
Sociology BA/BS
Spanish BA/BS/BSE
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Secondary Education)
 
Special Education BSE
Theatre BA/BS
  • (Acting)
  • (Design and Technology)
  • (Integrated)
 
Urban Planning BA/BS
Women's and Gender Studies BA/BS

D. Minors

 Adapted Physical Education (Secondary Education/BA/BS)
 African American Studies
 Anthropology
 Art
  • (Studio)
  • (History)
 Bilingual Education-Hmong (Elementary/Secondary Education)
 Bilingual Education-Spanish (Elementary/Secondary Education)
 Biology
 Business Administration
 Canada-U.S. Studies
 Chemistry
 Civic Engagement
 Communication
  • (Communication Studies)
  • (Organizational Communication)
  • (Speech Communication Education)
 Computer Science
 Criminal Justice
 Earth Science-Secondary Education
 Economics
 English
  • (Creative Writing)
  • (Secondary Education)
  • (Linguistics)
  • (Literature)
  • (Rhetoric)
 English as a Second Language (Elementary/Secondary Education)
 Environmental Studies
 French
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Elementary Education)
  • (Secondary Education)
 Geography
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Elementary Education)
  • (Secondary Education)
 Geology
 German
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Elementary Education)
  • (Secondary Education)
Global Business
 Health Education (Elementary/Secondary Education)
 History
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Elementary Education)
  • (Secondary Education)
 Insurance and Financial Planning 
 Interactive Web Management
 International Studies
  • (African Studies)
  • (Asian Studies)
  • (European Studies)
  • (Latin American Studies)
 Japanese Language and Culture 
 Journalism
 Language Arts
  •  (Elementary Education)
 Law and Policy
 Library Science
  •  (Elementary/Secondary Education)
 Mathematics
  • (Elementary and Junior High)
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Operations Research)
  • (Secondary Education)
  • (Statistics)
 Microbiology
 Military Science
 Music
 Music Industry
 Neurosciences
 Operations Research
 Philosophy
  •  (Liberal Arts)
 Physics
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Secondary Education)
 Political Science
 Psychology
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Secondary Education)
 Public Administration
 Radio-Television-Film 
 Reading
  •  (Elementary/Secondary Education)
 Religious Studies
  •  (Liberal Arts)
Risk Management and Actuarial Science
Science
  •  (Elementary Education)
Social Justice
Social Science
  •  (Elementary Education)
Sociology
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Elementary Education)
Spanish
  • (Liberal Arts)
  • (Elementary Education)
  • (Secondary Education)
Sustainability Management
Theatre 
Theatre Education (Elementary Education/Secondary)
Urban Planning 
Women's Studies

E. Master's and Doctoral Degrees

The Master's Degree is awarded in recognition of successful completion of approximately 30-60 credits of graduate course work by persons who have completed a Bachelor's Degree. The doctorate of nursing practice is a post-master's program requiring 28 credits. With full-time registration, these degrees are ordinarily completed in 2-3 years. The following degrees are awarded:

Master of Arts (MA)
Master of Business Administration (MBA)
Master of Data Science (MS)
Master of Public Administration (MPA)
Master of Science (MS)
Master of Science in Education (MSE)
Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)
Master of Social Work (MSW)
Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) 

The following are areas of academic study that award Master's or Doctoral degrees.

Academic AreaDegree
 Biology/Microbiology MS
 Business Administration MBA 
 Curriculum and Instruction MSE 
 Educational Leadership MS 
 English MA 
 Mathematics Education MS 
 Nursing MSN
DNP 
 Professional Counseling MSE 
 Psychology - Cognitive and
Affective
MS 
 Public Administration MPA 
 Reading Education MSE 
 Social Work MSW 
 Special Education MSE 
 Sustainable Management MS 

Refer to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Graduate Studies Bulletin for comprehensive information on all graduate programs.

Final Term Seniors
A final term senior at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh or another accredited college or university may be permitted to register for graduate course work during the term in which the baccalaureate degree will be awarded. Final term seniors must submit a statement from their undergraduate advisor certifying the requirements needed to complete the baccalaureate program. The student should have no more than nine (9) credits of undergraduate work remaining in a semester and no more than three (3) credits of undergraduate work remaining in a summer session. To be eligible to register as a final term senior, the student must meet all requirements for full standing admission to the graduate degree program with the exception of the baccalaureate degree requirement. Final term seniors are limited to a total undergraduate and graduate load of 12 credits in a semester or six (6) credits in a summer session. Graduate credits earned in this status may apply to baccalaureate degree requirements only as allowed in approved programs. Note that graduate credits counted toward a baccalaureate degree might not be applied toward a graduate degree and will be billed at the graduate rate of tuition.  Students are responsible for checking with a graduate department regarding the availability of a graduate class.

III. Undergraduate Degree Requirements

A.  The University Studies Program: General Education for the 21st Century

At UW Oshkosh, general education courses-those courses students take outside their major in order to gain basic knowledge and skills in many different areas-are completed in the University Studies Program (USP).  First-time students in all majors beginning their degree at UW Oshkosh starting Fall 2013 and after, will complete at least 41 credits of USP coursework. In these courses, students will explore a wide-variety of topics and issues while making progress on the Essential Learning Outcomes of a 21st century college education.  In each USP course, students will document and reflect upon their learning journeys using an online portfolio. Because USP courses will prepare students for advanced study at the university as well as life after graduation, students are encouraged to seek advising so they may choose USP courses that satisfy or enhance major or degree requirements. (A student's degree choice will have course requirements, in addition to the USP.)

Students will select USP Explore courses in three major categories: Nature (XM)/(XL), Culture (XC), and Society (XS).  Three of those Explore courses are intense and distinct learning community courses called "Quests" that need to be taken at designated times: first semester-Quest I;  second semester-Quest II; sophomore year-Quest III. Finally, in their fourth or fifth semester (after completing a Quest III course), students will take Connect. The Connect course is an advanced writing course that requires students to synthesize their learning in University Studies Program.

USP SIGNATURE QUESTIONS
Students will take one Quest course that investigates each of the following UW Oshkosh Signature Questions:

1.   Sustainability: How do people understand and create a more sustainable world?

2.   Civic Learning: How do people understand and engage in community life?

3.   Intercultural Knowledge*: How do people understand and bridge cultural differences?

*These courses also satisfy one of the following requirements: Ethnic Studies (ES) or Non-Western Culture (NW).
Effective Fall 2016, the NW requirement will be replaced the Global Citizenship (GC) requirement. 

First Semester: Students choose one of many Quest I courses. The Quest I course will be paired with a Quest Writing (WBIS 188) or Quest Speaking (Comm 111) course. The pairing of those two courses provides students with a small learning community investigating the same Signature Question, a first-year experience, and a peer mentor. During this first semester in the University Studies Program, students may take other Explore courses (see the USP website for a list of current Explore course options in Nature, Culture, and Society).  Though being “undecided” in the first semester is common and appropriate during this early “exploration” part of the college journey, some students may have declared a major. For students with or without a declared major, advising is needed to select first semester courses. The Quest I instructor and peer mentor will also be helpful during the first semester as students plan second semester course choices. Often, students discover something interesting in their first semester of exploration that affects their choices for second semester courses. 

Second Semester: Each student chooses one of many Quest II courses  with a different Signature Question than they investigated in their Quest I course. In Quest II courses, students explore the ethical dimensions of the Signature Questions.  In the second semester, students also enroll in a Quest Writing or Speaking course that is paired with their Quest II course. (Those students who complete Quest Writing in the first semester take Quest Speaking in the second semester; those who had Quest Speaking in the first semester take Quest Writing in the second semester.) During that second semester, students choose other Explore courses and perhaps courses expected for their major (if they have declared a major). Advisors will assist students in choosing Explore courses in the categories of Nature (Math and Lab Science), Culture, and Society, with the goal of completing their USP requirements in the first two years of college.   Choosing the Quest III course and other Explore courses for the sophomore year is an important activity in the second semester. 

Sophomore Year: As students complete their Explore courses and many declare a major program of study, sophomore students will also select and complete a Quest III course.  A student’s Quest III course is a unique part of the USP and UW Oshkosh.  Students need to choose a Quest III course that investigates the Signature Question they have not yet explored in their other Quest courses. Each Quest III course includes a Community Experience with a Community Partner and Alumni Mentors. 

Quest Decisions

Students will investigate a different Signature Question in each of their Quest courses.  For a current list of Quest options, with Signature Questions and information about pairings with Quest Writing and Speaking or unpaired options, please see:

USP Website.


NOTE: Courses in the QUEST series satisfy credit requirements in the EXPLORE category below

QUEST I

1st Semester 
First Year Experience (FYE)

Small learning community w/peer mentor

Paired with Writing or Speaking

Addresses one of the Signature Questions

QUEST II

2nd Semester 

Ethical Reasoning

Intense investigations of ethical dilemmas

Paired with Writing or Speaking

Addresses one of the Signature Questions

QUEST III

3rd or 4th Semester

Community Experience
Guided by Alumni Mentors

Not paired

Addresses one of the Signature Questions

A complete list of QUEST courses can be found at www.uwosh.edu/usp

**Students that have prior credit for writing and/or speaking take an unpaired QUEST course

University Studies Program Requirements

QUEST Writing: WBIS188 or ENGL110 (H)                            3 credits
(Remedial English may also be required based on English placement test score)

QUEST Speaking: COMM111 or COMM112 (H)                   3 credits

EXPLORE                                                                                      32 credits
(Remember to include Quest course choices in the appropriate area below)

Nature (XM & XL)                                                                         11 credits
(Consider math placement test results, major and degree requirements to determine appropriate course(s).
Remedial math may also be required based on math placement test score.)
     Mathematics (XM)                                                                  3 credits
     Laboratory Sciences (XL)                                                       8 credits

Culture (XC)                                                                                   9 credits
Choose 3 courses (from at least 2 different departments)                                                                              

Society (XS)                                                                                    9 credits
Choose 3 courses (from at least 2 different departments)                                                                             

Ethnic Studies (ES) / Non-Western Culture (NW)*                  3 credits
*One of these requirements is met by the Intercultural Knowledge QUEST course; however you must fulfill both    

Connect (XK)  English 300                                                           3 credits
Advanced Writing-4th or 5th semester (after QUEST III is completed)

The University requires a minimum of 41 credits in USP approved coursework

Special Considerations:  Capp or AP credits; math placement; English placement; foreign language placement; Transfer students (beginning Fall 2014 and Beyond;) and other special situations affect course selection and requirements. Please  seek advising before enrolling. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENT PRIOR TO FALL 2013

Click here for pdf grid of General Education Requirements for Students Prior to Fall 2013

B. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements

Summary of Degree Requirements Common to All Colleges

  1. All baccalaureate degrees require the completion of at least 120 earned term units (crs.) (passing grades of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, or P or their equivalents). Units (crs.) from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, other accredited institutions, and the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh approved Prior Learning programs may be used to meet this requirement. Note: Remedial courses do not count in the 120 credits required.
  2. At least 41 units (crs.) of the 120 unit (cr.) total must be earned in University Studies Program coursework.
  3. At least 30 units (crs.) of the 120 term units (crs.) applied to the degree must be earned in University of Wisconsin Oshkosh courses.
  4. At least 15 of the last 30 term units (crs.) applied to the degree must be earned in the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh courses.
  5. A minimum of 35 of the 120 term units (crs.) must be earned in upper level courses (those earned at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh numbered 300 and above or units (crs.) earned at a transfer institution and defined as upper-level by the standards of that institution).
  6. All degrees require that a minimum grade point average of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) be achieved in each of the following categories;
    • official UW Oshkosh grade point average. Units (crs.) attempted shall be defined as any units (crs.) for which a grade of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, or F, or their equivalents, has been assigned;
    • all upper-level units (crs.) attempted;
    • all units (crs.) attempted in courses identified by departments or programs as applicable to the major and/or minor requirements; (unless otherwise specified)
    • all courses eligible for application to the English composition requirement portion of the University Studies Program requirement.

NOTES: All calculations of the official grade point average will be based upon the academic record as maintained by the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. If a course is repeated, the last grade received will be the one calculated in the grade point average. A grade of Incomplete from another institution will not be carried into the record maintained at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh.

7. All baccalaureate degrees require the completion of the University Studies Program (USP) requirements.
In addition, special course and grade point requirements of a particular degree, curriculum, major and/or minor selected by the student must be met.

8. The Bulletin used to determine these requirements must have been current during the student's attendance at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, or at any other regionally accredited college or university, and may be no more than 6 years old at the time of graduation. Within this 6-year time frame, students may choose a more recent Bulletin published for degree, major, minor or general education requirements.

Exceptions to this policy include:

  • Changes in policy and/or procedures made during the six-year period will automatically be effective for the transfer or readmitted student unless the policy change(s) specifically allows continuance under the old policy and/or procedures.
  • When outside agencies such as the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) or professional accrediting agencies mandate changes in major/minor or curriculum requirements, the six-year period is not applicable.

C. Special Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science Degrees

In addition to the University Studies Program requirements (Section III. A), students working toward either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in the College of Letters and Science are required to complete as stated below, an approved academic major; completion of an approved minor is usually optional. However, some majors require that a minor also be completed.

1. Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts (BA)

  • Foreign Languages: Students without previous foreign language preparation must complete credits in a single foreign language by passing the final course in the sequence (110, 111, 203 and 204 in French, German, Russian, or Spanish; or 110, 111, 210 and 211 in Arabic, Chinese, or Japanese or obtain a proficiency waiver through the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. For students with a foreign language background, a portion of this requirement may be awarded through advanced placement. See the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for details.
  • Humanities: At least 12 units (crs.) are required from departments comprising the Humanities Division.  All Explore: Culture (XC) courses in the USP are considered Humanities courses.  Of these, at least one course must be taken from the following areas: 1) Art, Drama, Music; 2) Literature; and 3) Philosophy, Religious Studies.  Foreign Language may NOT be used as one of the areas in the Humanities component of the BA degree requirements, although they may be used as one of the areas in the University Minimum Requirement.  For the BA, there is a separate Foreign Language Requirement.  See above for details.
  • Social Science: At least 12 units (crs.) must be taken from at least two of the Social Science areas. One must include 3 units (crs) of history.
  • Speech Communication: Fundamentals of Speech Communications, Communication 111 must be completed or the oral communication competency exam must be passed. (See Communication Department for details.)

2Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (BS)

  • Mathematics/Statistics/Computer Science:
    • Math 104* or Math 108* or Math 204
    • *It is possible to meet this requirement via the UW System Mathematics Placement Exam.
    • One course from the following in Mathematics/Statistics/Computer Science:
      • Calculus: Mathematics 171, 172, 175, 206
      • Statistics: Mathematics 201, 301, Economics 210, Geography 385, Psychology 203, 341, Sociology 281, Criminal Justice 281
      • Computer Science: Computer Science 221, 262.

        Each course listed has a Mathematics course as a prerequisite. Students must complete the prerequisite course with a grade of "C" or better prior to enrolling in any of the listed courses. In some cases the prerequisite can be met via the UW System Mathematics Placement Exam.

  • Humanities: At least 12 units (crs.) must be taken from the Humanities area. Of these units (crs.), one course must be taken from Literature; and two courses from at least two of the following three course areas: 1) Art, Drama, Music; 2) Philosophy, Religious Studies; and 3) Foreign Languages.
  • Social Science: At least 12 units (crs.) must be taken from at least two of the Social Science areas. One must include 3 units (crs) of history.
  • Speech Communication: Either Fundamentals of Speech Communications, Communication 111, must be completed or the oral communication competency exam must be passed. (See Communication Department for details.
  • Natural Science (NS): Four courses are required:
    • Two must be from laboratory science courses from one of the following departments: Biology/Microbiology, Chemistry, Geography, Geology, and Physics/Astronomy. The first course must be the prerequisite for the second.
    • A third course must be a laboratory science course from a department other than the one offering the two courses above.
    • The fourth course must be either: a) a course for which the third course is a prerequisite, OR b) a laboratory science course from a third department, OR c) a course from those listed under the B.S. Math Requirement (not used to fulfill the Math Requirement).

D. Specific College and Program

Baccalaureate Degree Requirements
The University offers eleven baccalaureate degrees; all degrees require a minimum of 120 units (crs.) for graduation. Specific requirements for all degrees may be obtained from this Bulletin, the appropriate College, or from an academic advisor.

Many program areas have special requirements, which must be met before students can begin a particular area of study. For example, some professional, clinical, and other sequences accept students into the program only after a period of prior academic preparation. Such programs have academic requirements for admission, which are published, either in the Bulletin or in a separate document available from the appropriate department.

College of Letters and Science
Students completing the baccalaureate degree with a College of Letters and Science major must complete a minimum of 35 units (crs.) of upper level course work. Also, at least 96 units (crs.) must be in Letters and Science course work. No more than 24 of the 120 units (crs.) required for graduation may be taken from professional college courses. Courses classified as "professional" for this purpose are: All nursing courses (Nursing); all education courses (Services Courses through Human Services and Counselor Education), departmental courses for teaching methods, physical education activity courses beyond 4 units (crs.), physical education majors' courses for teachers; all business courses (Business) except Business 131; mathematics courses for teaching arithmetic, Physics/Astronomy 201 (Statistics) and Physics/Astronomy 202 (Dynamics); and courses in surveying, engineering drawing (Practical Arts).

College of Education and Human Services
Students completing a baccalaureate degree with a College of Education and Human Services major must earn at least 42 units (crs.) in upper-level courses. In addition, all grade point and other requirements must be met prior to entry into Admission I, Practicum, Clinical, and Admission II for education majors. Also, all course and grade point average requirements must be met by Human Services majors prior to entry into intermediate, and major fieldwork.

College of Nursing
Requirements must be met as published at the time of the student's application for acceptance into the nursing clinical sequence.

Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement
Some credits from technical colleges transferred to a LLCE program may not transfer to other UW Oshkosh programs. Please check with your advisor for more information.

E. Second Bachelor's Degree

A graduate of the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh who wishes to complete a second and different undergraduate baccalaureate degree must:

  • earn a minimum of 16 units (crs.) in residence (the units (crs.) must not have been applied to the requirements of the first degree);
  • meet all specific requirements of the new degree.

Both degrees may be awarded at the same commencement ceremony.
A graduate of another accredited college or university may be awarded an undergraduate baccalaureate degree in the same or another academic area at University of Wisconsin Oshkosh by successfully completing:

  • 28 weeks (e.g., two semesters) in residence on the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh campus;
  • a minimum of 30 term unit (cr.) hours;
  • all requirements of the degree being sought;
  • The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh General Education Requirements.

NOTE: If degree is from a UW System School, general education requirements have been met.

NOTE: Completion of an additional major within the same University of Wisconsin Oshkosh baccalaureate degree will not result in the awarding of a second degree. Before embarking on a program leading to a second degree, students should contact an advisor in the Undergraduate Advising Resource Center (UARC), Student Success Center, Suite 202.

IV. COURSES, GRADES AND ACADEMIC STANDARDS

A. Interpreting Course Numbers

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh courses are designated by a subject code, which identifies the department or program offering the course, and a three-digit course catalog number. Some 300- and 400- level courses also provide graduate level unit (cr.). In these cases, two course numbers will appear; e.g., International Studies 302/502. Students enrolled in such courses for graduate unit (cr.) must meet requirements beyond those for undergraduate unit (cr.).


The subject codes are assigned to the various departments or programs according to the following key: 

Dept.

Subject

Star Codes

ACAD Academic Skills 10
ACCT Accounting 58
ANTHRO Anthropology 21
AF AM ST African American Studies
23
ARABIC Arabic
42
ART Art 22
ARAPAHO Arapaho 53
BIOLOGY  Biology and Microbiology
26
BUSINESS Business
28
CHEM Chemistry
32
CHINESE Chinese
56
CNSLR ED Counselor Education
29
COMM  Communication
96
COMP SCI Computer Science
34
CRIM JUS  Criminal Justice
35
DFLL Dept. of Foreign Languages & Lit.
39
ECON Economics
36
ED FOUND Educational Foundations
12
ED LDRSP Educational Leadership
17
ELEM ED Elementary Education 13
ENG TECH Engineering Technology
33
ENV STDS Environmental Studies
37
FERM Fire & Emergency Response Mgmt.
03
FINANCE Finance
62
FRENCH French
41
GEOG Geography
50
GEOLOGY Geology
51
GERMAN German
43
HEALTH ED Health Education
55
HISTORY History
57
HONORS Honors Program
00
HUMAN SV Human Services Leadership
18
INFO SYS Information Systems
64
INTRDSCP Interdisciplinary Studies
94
INTRNT’L  International Studies
59
JAPANESE Japanese
44
JOURNAL Journalism
61
KINESIOL Kinesiology
77
LIB STDS Bachelor of Liberal Studies
31
MGMT & HR Management and Human Resources
63
MARKETING Marketing
66
MATH Mathematics
67
MED TECH  Medical Technology
68
MIL SCI Military Science
70
MPA Master of Public Affairs
83
MUSIC Music
73
NUR-ACC Nursing
78
NURS-CNP Nursing
71
NURSING Nursing
74
PHIL Philosophy
76
PHY/AST Physics/Astronomy
82
PHY ED Human Kinetics and Health Education
79
PHYS SCI Physical Science
80
POL SCI Political Science
84
PRAC ARTS  Practical Arts
85
PBIS PBIS Problem-Based Inquiry Seminar
89
PSYCH Psychology
86
PUB ADM Public Administration 81
RTF Radio-TV-Film 95
READING  Reading Education
15
RELSTDS Religious Studies
87
RUSSIAN Russian
48
SOC Sociology
92
SEC ED Secondary Education
14
SOC JUSTICE Social Justice
91
SOC WORK Social Work
93
SPANISH Spanish
49
SPEC ED Special Education
16
SRVC CRS Service Courses in Education
11
SCM Supply Chain & Operations Mgmt.
69
SMGT Sustainability Management
19
WBIS WBIS Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar
88
THEATRE Theatre
97
USP University Studies Program
07
URB/REG  Urban Planning 
99
WM STUD Women's and Gender Studies
98

Course descriptions are found in each department's section. The course title is followed by one or two sets of numbers. The numbers in parentheses (when these appear) indicate the division of time between lecture and laboratory. The first number indicates the number of lecture or problem hours (discussion group), and the second number indicates the number of laboratory hours. The number outside the parentheses indicates the number of units (crs.) the course carries; for example, in a science course listed (3+4) 5 cr., the numbers in parentheses indicate 3 lecture hours and 4 laboratory hours. The 5 cr. indicates course units (crs.). If there is no breakdown listed, assume the course is lecture only.

Abbreviations
Designations on course titles that can be used to satisfy General Education prior to Fall 2013.  Please see your academic advisor if you have any questions.

(EN) English
(ES) Ethnic Studies
(GE) General Education
(HU) Humanities
(MA) Mathematics
(NS) Natural Science
(NW) Non-Western
(PE) Physical Education
(SS) Social Science
Designations on course titles that can be used to satisfy General Education starting Fall 2013.  Please see your academic advisor if you have any questions.
(EN) English
(ES) Ethnic Studies
(GE) General Education
(XC) Culture
(XM) Mathematics
(XN) Nature
(XL) Laboratory Science
(NW) Non-Western (starting fall 2016, replaced by(GC) Global Citizenship
(CS) Capstone
(XK) Connect
(XS) Society

B. Prerequisites

A number of courses have class level, college or specified course(s) as a pre-registration requirement. These prerequisites are determined by each appropriate department or college based on educational or curricular reasons. Students desiring an exemption from a course prerequisite should discuss their interests with the professor of the course in question.

C. Grade Policies

  1. Grade point averages are calculated by dividing the number of grade points earned by the number of units (crs.) attempted. The University's grading scale changed from an 8 point scale to a 12 point scale effective Fall 2009. This does not affect grades awarded prior to Fall 2009. Point values are related to the various letter grades as follows:
    Grade Scale Effective Fall 2009

    Letter GradeGrade Points per Unit (cr.)
    A
    4.00
    A-
    3.67
    B+
    3.33
    B
    3.00
    B-
    2.67
    C+
    2.33
    C
    2.00
    C-
    1.67
    D+
    1.33
    D
    1.00
    D-
    0.67
    F (Failure)
    0.00

    Grade Scale Prior to Fall 2009

    Letter GradeGrade Points per Unit (cr.)
    A
    4.00
    AB
    3.50
    B
    3.00
    BC
    2.50
    C
    2.00
    CD
    1.50
    D
    1.00
    F (Failure)
    0.00
  2. Students transferring to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh campus from a college or university, which has a different grading system, may calculate the grade points transferred according to the following table:

    Letter Grade
    Grade Points per Unit (cr.)
    A
    4.00
    A-
    3.67
    AB
    3.50
    B+
    3.33
    B
    3.00
    B-
    2.67
    BC
    2.50
    C+
    2.33
    C
    2.00
    C-
    1.67
    CD
    1.50
    D+
    1.33
    D
    1.00
    D-
    0.67
    F (Failure)
    0.00

    Grades for courses transferred to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh are not calculated in the official grade point but may be used in calculating the student's combined (cumulative) grade point average on the Student Academic Report (STAR).

  3. The transfer student's Student Academic Report (STAR) will display:

    1. Transfer institution(s) course numbers and titles as transferred, units (crs.) attempted, units (crs.) earned, grades, and grade points;

    2. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh course numbers and titles, units (crs.) attempted, units (crs.) earned, grades, grade points, grade point average;

    3. All institutions' units (crs.) attempted, units (crs.) earned, grade points, and combined (cumulative) grade point average.

  4. The Official Transcript of the transfer student will display:

    1. Transfer institution(s) course numbers and titles as transferred, units (crs.) attempted, units (crs.) earned, and grades;

    2. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh course numbers and titles, units (crs.) attempted, units (crs.) earned, grades, grade points and term grade point averages;

    3. All institutions units (crs.) attempted, units (crs.) earned, grade points;

    4. The official grade point average.

  5. Several other grade designations are assigned in special circumstances. They may include the following:

    1. Pass/Fail

      Some University of Wisconsin Oshkosh courses are offered on a Pass/Fail basis. Units (crs.) in these courses are included as part of the term unit (cr.) load. Pass units (crs.) are recorded as units (crs.) earned but units (crs.) passed are not considered as units (crs.) attempted in computing the term and cumulative grade point averages. Grades of Failure (F) in a Pass/Fail course are considered as units (crs.) attempted in computing the term and cumulative grade point averages.

    2. Incomplete (I)

      The designation of Incomplete (I) is assigned when a student is unable to complete the course work because of illness, injury, or other extenuating circumstances. "I" designations may also be assigned to students in project-centered courses in which instruction is highly individualized, or in individually paced courses in which the material is extensively organized and students can progress at rates determined by their abilities. In the latter case, an "I" may be assigned only if at least two-thirds of the course objectives have been accomplished within the grading period, and the student has maintained a consistent rate of progress in the course.

      The student and instructor will make written arrangements allowing the Incomplete to be removed within the next 17-week term. These arrangements must be described in full on a "Work Incomplete" form (form available from each college) to be filed with the appropriate department chairperson before the official grade is recorded.

      Courses for which an Incomplete has been assigned are included as part of the term unit (cr.) load. Incomplete designations are not included in grade point computations.

      NOTE: A student may not graduate from the University if an Incomplete appears on the student's transcript. In order to qualify for graduation, all incomplete grades must be recorded as a final letter grade before the official end of the term in which the student wishes to graduate. The student may request that an Incomplete be converted to an F grade in order to be allowed to graduate. AFTER GRADUATION, NO GRADE CHANGE IS ALLOWED.

      Incomplete designations that have not been changed to appropriate course letter grades through instructor action by the last day of the following 17-week term, are automatically assigned an "F". The Registrar's Office will alert both the student and the department chairperson to these impending grade assignments at least two weeks before they are made. Extensions of time must be arranged through the appropriate Department Chairperson or equivalent.

    3. Audit (AU)

      Students may wish to audit a course in order to learn more about a subject, which is of personal interest, and/or to prepare for future courses, which they may wish to take or be required. The signature of the instructor is required in order to register for a course for audit.

      If a course is audited, the student will receive a designation of AU on their grade report and transcript. An audit is not a grade and is not calculated in a grade point average; it carries no degree unit (cr.).

      Students who audit courses are expected to attend class regularly but need not take examinations or do other course work which would require evaluation by the instructor. The instructor may withdraw the student for non-attendance. Students may change the status of a course from audit to unit (cr.) during the first 20 class days of a 17- or 14- week term; during the first 10 days of 10-, 8- or 7-week term, or during the first 3 days of a 4- or 3-week term. The signature of the instructor is required to change registration of a course from audit to unit (cr.).

      Students changing from unit (cr.) to audit after the first week of a term will be charged the full per unit (cr.) fee for the course.

D. Repeated Courses

Students may register to repeat courses to improve their grade(s) on a space available basis at the time they are scheduled to register. However, students should check with their advisors to find out if their major has additional regulations on course repeats. Each course may be repeated only once. Students may appeal that restriction through the Department or College which offers the course.

Students may only repeat a course if they have received a grade lower than a C. The most recent grade awarded will be used in the computation of grade point averages and credit earned. If a student repeats a course and earns a lower grade, the lower grade will be used in the computation of grade point averages. Although grades earned at other post-secondary institutions will be included on the credit evaluation and on the official transcript, the official UW Oshkosh grade point average is not affected by grades earned elsewhere (See Official Grade Point Policy). Undergraduate courses repeated after graduation will not change the undergraduate official grade point average.

Note: Although TitanWeb will allow registration for all repeats of courses, students may only repeat courses in which they received a grade lower than a C. It is the student's responsibility to be aware of this policy and to adhere by the rules. Courses repeated with a C or higher will not be counted in any University academic requirements and flagged as such on the transcript. Any request to repeat a course with a C or higher, needs to be appealed to the appropriate college and approved before registration in the course. Students are responsible for any fees associated with repeated courses dropped due to lack of appeal.

Note: Courses that are repeatable for credit may not be repeated to improve a student's grade point average unless content is the same in both courses.  Appeals must be approved prior to registering for the course.

E. Class Standing

A student's class standing is determined by successful completion of units (crs.).

Units(crs.) Earned
Class Standing
90+ Senior
60-89 Junior
30-59 Sophomore
0-29 Freshman

F. Requirements of Colleges, Departments or Professional Programs

Each college, department, or professional program may establish its own grade point average requirements for admission, retention or graduation and/or licensure, but computation of the official grade point average will be based upon UW Oshkosh courses only. The combined (cumulative) grade point, which will appear on the STAR, will include all units (crs.) attempted in all applicable courses.

G. Honors

1.  Graduation Honors

a. Graduation Honors is determined by the official grade point average and whether graduation is cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude. 
b. Students whose official grade point average qualifies them for graduation with honors the term before they graduate will be recognized at the Commencement Ceremony. Honors designation on transcripts will be based upon the student's completed academic record. 
c. Official grade point requirements for graduation honors:

      • Cum Laude: 3.5 grade point average
      • Magna Cum Laude: 3.75 grade point average
      • Summa Cum Laude: 3.90 grade point average

d. A minimum of 60 units (crs.) must be earned at UW Oshkosh for a transfer student to be eligible for Graduation Honors.

2.  College Honors - While our Undergraduate Honors policy is consistent with national and UW System honors policies, we continue to increase our transfer and articulation agreements with other universities and colleges in the region. As a result, we anticipate a growing number of students to graduate who have not accrued the 60 credits necessary to be eligible for University Honors at commencement. Therefore, the four colleges and the LLCE will award College Honors to those students who have earned 30 to 59 credits at UW Oshkosh and have a 3.5 official grade point or higher. Those who have met these standards will wear a white honors cord and be asked to rise so that they can be recognized by the audience at the Commencement ceremony. College Honors is not designated on the official transcript, only at commencement.

3.  Term Honor Roll - A student who has completed a program of at least 12 Term units (crs.) hours (not including P/F courses) during that term and has received a term grade point average of 3.30 or better, with no individual course grade below "C", no grades of ”I” incomplete, and no non-reported grades at the time the process is run, is placed on the University Honor Roll.

4.  Dean's List - A student who has completed a program of at least 12 Term units (crs.) hours (not including P/F courses) during that term and has completed a term grade point average of 3.75 or better, with no individual term course grade below a "C", no grade of “I” incomplete, and no non-reported grades at the time the process is run, is placed on the Dean's List.

H. Graduation From the University

Students planning to graduate from the University should obtain information regarding the Application for Graduation on-line at www.uwosh.edu/registrar. The completed application must be filed with the Registrar's Office, Dempsey 130, before the end of the term preceding the term in which the student plans to graduate.

A graduation status review will be completed in the Registrar's Office and emailed to the student. Students whose records are incomplete (e.g., course incomplete, official transcripts for transfer courses not on file, grades not recorded) or who fail to meet degree requirements may be considered for graduation in a subsequent term provided the graduation examiner is notified via email. These students may need to file another Application for Graduation.

A student may not graduate from the University if an incomplete grade appears on the student's transcript. In order to qualify for graduation, all Incompletes must be recorded as a final letter grade before the official end of the term the student wishes to graduate. The student may request that an Incomplete be converted to a grade of F in order to be allowed to graduate. After graduation, no grade changes are allowed.

Commencement ceremonies are held in December and May at the end of each 14-week term. Students whose graduation date is at the end of the summer term have the option of participating in the graduation ceremony of either the spring or fall commencement nearest their graduation date. A student's official graduation date will be the final day of classes of the 17-week fall or spring or 8-week summer term in which he or she completes the graduation requirements. All requirements for graduation must be completed by the final day of the term in which the student wishes to graduate.

Students may apply for and be granted their degrees at the end of a term without having been registered for course work during that term.

I. Good Standing Requirements

Students are expected to meet requirements to remain in good academic standing. Requirements involve both academic and unit (cr.) completion standards. All students enrolled for 6 or more units (crs.) are reviewed each term following completion of the 14-week term.

The official grade point average is used for determination of academic standing.

  • Academic standards
    1. Maintain a minimum 2.0 official cumulative grade point average.

    2. Earn a minimum of 1.0 term grade point average.

  • Unit (cr.) completion standards
    1. Earn a minimum of 9 units (crs.) per term if a full-time student (enrolled for 12 or more units (crs.)).

    2. Earn a minimum of 5 units (crs.) per term if a part-time student (enrolled for 6-11 units (crs.)).

    3. The unit (cr.) completion requirement must be met each term and is cumulative. Thus, a student who enrolls for 12 or more units (crs.) each term must complete the following:

      after 1 term - at least 9 units (crs.)

      after 2 terms - at least 18 units (crs.)

      after 3 terms - at least 27 units (crs.)

      after 4 terms - at least 36 units (crs.).

    4. Interim courses taken in weeks 15-17 of the fall and spring semesters are counted in this requirement.

    5. Courses taken during summer session contribute to the cumulative unit (cr.) totals but do not eliminate a prior term's failure to satisfy the unit (cr.) completion requirements.

J. Probation and Suspension Policies

Students are placed on probation or suspension following the 14-week term when they fail to satisfy the Good Standing Requirements. However, if, by the end of the 17th week of a term, additional course work has been completed and/or a grade(s) has been changed which improves the student's academic record, the status will be reviewed and adjusted appropriately. Academic probation status is determined through a review process by the appointee of all the colleges. The Review Process includes the following:

  1. On Probation

    A student whose record does not meet the requirements for good standing will be placed on probation in accordance with the particular requirements of the University.

  2. Suspension

    Suspension is a classification of probation resulting in the complete severance of the student from the university for at least one term and a summer session. Suspension will generally occur when:

    1. A student fails to achieve Good Standing in three consecutive semesters; or

    2. A student fails to achieve Good Standing in one or two consecutive semesters if he/she was admitted to the university as a transfer or reentry student who did not meet the Good Standing Requirements; or

    3. A student who, after having been academically suspended and allowed to continue or reenter the university, fails to meet the Good Standing Requirements; or

    4. A student who has a term grade point average below 1.00; or

    5. A student has failed to meet satisfactory academic progress standards.

  3. Notification of probation/suspension status 

    Each student who has been placed on probation or suspension will be notified by email from the Registrar's Office. For students enrolled in interim this status is subject to change. 

  4. Suspension Appeals

    University suspension may be appealed if the student believes there are circumstances that warrant an appeal. Normally, such circumstances would involve situations external to the student, which prevented the achievement of minimum academic standards. Students must document the situation with second party confirmation.

    Students who are appealing need to file a Suspension Appeal. The Suspension Appeal and supporting documents (e.g. second party confirmation) must be submitted on or before the established appeal deadline to the appropriate University designee specified in the email notification. The suspension appeal decision is final.

Reentry to the University after suspension

After a term and summer session of suspension, a student may request re-admission to the University by completing the REENTRY APPLICATION, which is available from the Admission Office, Dempsey 135. THE APPLICATION FOR REENTRY MUST BE SUBMITTED BY JULY 15 FOR THE FALL TERM AND DECEMBER 15 FOR THE SPRING TERM. In order to be formally considered for reentry, a student must provide evidence that the problems leading to suspension have been resolved and that he/she is now prepared to be successful. Requests for reentry should only be made when one or more of the following have been accomplished:

  1. UW Oshkosh "Incomplete" grades have been completed, resulting in an academic record, which meets the required grade point standards and the academic standards of the University.

  2. Courses completed at another college or university (or through correspondence work), with acceptable grades and academic progress, are documented on an official transcript reentry application. Note: transfer courses will not affect the UW Oshkosh official grade point.

  3. Progress has been made toward resolving personal concerns, which previously had hampered academic achievement. Written confirmation by the appropriate professional must be submitted with the reentry application (Example: medical statement).

For additional information contact: The Registrar's Office, Phone: 920-424-3007, Dempsey Hall 130, 144C.

K. Developmental Education Policy

In accordance with UW System Policy, UW Oshkosh requires students who place into developmental courses to successfully complete these courses before they earn 30 credits at UW Oshkosh.

Based on scores from the required Regional Placement Test, and ACT score for reading remediation, students are placed into appropriate developmental courses.  The following UW Oshkosh courses require completion before the 30 credit threshold:

Mathematics  100  4 (crs.)

Elementary Algebra

  • Basic concepts about real numbers, fundamental operations of arithmetic, algebraic expressions, an introduction to linear equations and problem solving, graphing linear equations, factoring, exponents and polynomials, rational expressions and equations. Only those students failing to meet the prerequisites for courses at the Mathematics 103 level will be recommended for this course. This course does not count toward the 120 units (crs.) necessary for graduation. A grade of C or better is required to remove mathematics deficiency.

Mathematics   103  3 (crs.)

Intermediate Algebra

  • Functions, tables and graphs, problem solving, inequalities in one variable, exponents and radicals, quadratic functions, exponential and logarithmic functions. This course does not count towards the 120 units credits (crs.) necessary for graduation. Prerequisites: Mathematics 100 with a C or better or placement. Not open to students who have completed Mathematics 104 or higher.

English   100  3 (crs.)

Foundations of College English

  • A course designed to develop competencies in the fundamentals of English grammar, usage, sentence structure and paragraph writing. Through individualized instruction and tutoring, students placed in English 100 are prepared, upon satisfactory completion, to enter English 101. Units (crs.) earned in English 100 do not apply toward the 42 unit (cr.) general education requirement or toward the minimum 120 units (crs.) required for graduation. Prerequisites: Not open to students who have received credit for WBIS 188, English 101 or English 110. A grade of C or better is required to remove English deficiency. Pass/Fail course.

Academic Skills  100  2 (crs.)

Developmental Reading Skills

  • Developmental Reading Skills is a basic reading course designed to strengthen the reading skills needed for college-level work. Diagnostic evaluation will be followed by group and individual instruction stressing comprehension and vocabulary skills. Students should consult their adviser about the appropriateness of this course for their program. This course does not count toward the 120 units (crs.) necessary for graduation.

Students will be required to complete all of the above developmental course(s) prior to reaching 30 earned credits.  Registration holds may be placed on a student’s record requiring them to meet with their UARC academic advisor.  Students will need permission to drop the course.

Failure to complete the courses in a timely manner may delay graduation.

Students are expected to meet requirements to remain in good academic standing. Requirements involve both academic and unit (cr.) completion standards. All students enrolled for 6 or more units (crs.) are reviewed each term following completion of the 14-week term.

V. COURSE AND ACADEMIC POLICIES

A. Official Grade Point Policy

As of Fall 2007, the official UW Oshkosh grade point includes only UW Oshkosh courses. This will NOT remove any previous transfer credits posted prior to Fall 2007 from your official grade point average. This is only for transfer credits that newly appeared on your transcript starting in Fall 2007.

Please review the Question and Answer section located on the Registrar's web page at the following link:http://www.uwosh.edu/registrar/policies/official-grade-point-policy for additional information. Please see your UARC advisor with any questions.

B. Course Attendance

While attendance and punctuality are under the control of each instructor, students are expected to be present for each scheduled class session. Instructors may drop students from their class who do not attend the first session of the semester. 
Note: Primary responsibility of dropping a class resides with the student.

  1. Students are directly responsible to each of their instructors for attendance in each scheduled class.

  2. Instructors may initiate their own policies regarding attendance; if an instructor teaches more than one section of a course, the same policy should be used for all sections.

  3. Instructors are expected to announce their attendance policy to each class, but it is the responsibility of the student to know the policies of each of his/her instructors.

  4. If students must be absent to participate in a group activity sponsored by the University and approved by the Vice Chancellor, the group's faculty advisor or the instructor in charge should provide a signed excuse at the request of a participating student.

  5. A college dean may recommend to the instructor that a student who incurs an absence for personal reasons be excused.

  6. A University physician may, at his/her discretion, recommend to the instructor that a student who incurs an absence for health reasons be excused.

  7. In all cases of absence, excused or otherwise, the student is responsible for completing missed work. The instructor is not required to do extra teaching unless so assigned.

  8. Students may only attend courses/sections for which they are registered.

C. Maximum Student Unit (cr.) Loads

One unit (cr.) is generally equivalent to 14 class hours of instruction (lecture) work per term (laboratory, discussion, studio and physical activity experiences normally require more time per unit (cr.).)
Recognizing that precise definitions of student unit (cr.) load are difficult to realize in all cases, the following unit (cr.) load maximums have been established for undergraduates.

17-week term 21 units (crs.)
14-week term 18 units (crs.)
7-week term 9 units (crs.)
3-week term 3 units (crs.)
8-week term 9 units (crs.)
4-week term 6 units (crs.)

In extraordinary circumstances, students may file a written request to exceed these limits. Students should see an advisor in the Undergraduate Advising Resource Center for application for permission to schedule an overload. Final decisions on overload requests are made by the Academic Advisor or Dean’s Designee.

Units (crs.) dropped after the first week may incur a cost. See Fee Table for clarification.

D. Changing a Student's Registration

ADDING A COURSE
If you add or drop courses during the 11-20th academic calendar day of the fall or spring term resulting in your having added or dropped 19 or more units (crs.) for the 17-week term, you will incur an additional tuition charge on a per unit (cr.) basis. A student may add courses as follows:

Course Length: Course adds are allowed to the end of class day (without instructor's signature): Course adds are allowed to the end of class day (with instructor's signature):
14/17 weeks 5th day 20th day
7 weeks 5th day 10th day
3 weeks 2nd day 5th day
8/10 weeks 5th day 10th day
4 weeks 2nd day 5th day

A student wanting to add a course after the deadline (instructor signature required) must complete a REQUEST FOR LATE ADD FORM describing relevant extenuating circumstances. This form is available in the Registrar's Office, Dempsey 130, and can be completed in conjunction with the instructor of the course and your advisor. The appeal must be approved by the appropriate College Dean's Office.

DROPPING A COURSE

Course Length: Course drops are allowed to the end of the class day:
14/17 weeks 33rd day
7 weeks 20th day
3 weeks 10th day
8/10 weeks 22nd day
4 weeks 11th day

Course drops completed during the above time periods will not be reflected on the student's transcript. Courses dropped after the deadlines may receive a grade of Withdrawal "W".

A student wanting to drop a course after the above deadlines must complete a REQUEST FOR LATE DROP FORM describing relevant extenuating circumstances. This form is available in the Registrar's Office, Dempsey 130, and can be completed in conjunction with the instructor of the course and your advisor. The appeal must be approved by the appropriate College Dean's Office. Students should consult the Fee/Refund Schedule for refunds and charges, as fee policy may not coincide with academic policy.

The drop policy also pertains to changes from unit (cr.) to audit.

Instructors may drop students from their class who do not attend the first session of the semester.

Note: Primary responsibility of dropping a class resides with the student.

E. Withdrawal from the University

Withdrawal is a complete severance of attendance from the University. A student may request withdrawal after the opening day of classes in any term by completing a TERM WITHDRAWAL FORM, available in the Registrar's Office, Dempsey 130, or by sending an email with your full name, ID#, and term you are withdrawing from to: withdraw@uwosh.edu.  Withdrawal deadlines:

Course Length: Withdrawals are allowed with advisor's signature to the end of the class day:
14/17 weeks 33rd day
7 weeks 20th day
3 weeks 10th day
8/10 weeks 22nd day
4 weeks 11th day

Students seeking to withdraw after the deadlines must complete a TERM WITHDRAWAL FORM for approval by the appropriate Assistant Director of Advising and Dean's Designee. Total withdrawal from the university after the late drop deadline automatically assigns W grades to all courses except completed courses for the term. If the request is not approved, grades will be placed on the student's record as assigned by instructors.

NOTE: Withdrawal does not remove the obligation for costs incurred by a student during a term.

Students who have already completed a course during the term and wish to leave the University will retain the grade of the completed class (i.e. a seven-week class) and should drop the remaining courses. Total withdrawal from the University automatically assigns "W" grades to all courses, except completed courses for the term.

A student who withdraws and does not register for the following term must complete reentry procedures to return for a subsequent term.

F. 165 Excess Credit Policy

Wisconsin resident undergraduate students who have earned 165 credits (or 30 credits more than required for their degree programs, whichever is greater) will be charged a surcharge, equal to 100 percent of the regular resident tuition, on credits beyond that level. The surcharge will be applied to students in the semester following the one in which they reach the earned credit limit.

This policy covers all Wisconsin resident undergraduate students pursuing their first Bachelors degree, including students pursuing a double major. Minnesota residents and non-residents, graduate, post-baccalaureate, and non-degree students are not affected. This policy applies to all credits earned at UW System and Wisconsin Technical College System transfer credits accepted toward a degree. Retroactive, AP, military, and other college transfer credits do not count toward the total.

G. Exceptions to Academic Policy

Students may request exceptions to academic policy, including but not limited to, period to add a course; period to drop a course; period to withdraw from a term; number of times a course may be repeated; maximum number of units (crs.) per term; General Education requirements; and degree requirements.

Students who want to request exceptions can work with their advisor to complete the necessary paperwork and provide supporting documentation. The decision made by the College Dean or Dean's Designee is final.

H. University Email Policy

Email is considered an official method for communicating with University of Wisconsin Oshkosh students because it delivers information in a convenient, timely, cost effective and environmentally aware manner. The University expects that email communications will be received and read by students in a timely fashion. This policy establishes the University's expectation that faculty and other University staff may routinely communicate important information to students using the University's established email system.

Email is an official method for communication at UW Oshkosh. The University may send communications to students via email. Students are responsible for the consequences of not reading in a timely fashion University-related communications sent to their official UW Oshkosh student email account.

All students at UW Oshkosh are provided with an official UW Oshkosh student email account. This email account is the official address to which the University will send email communications. This official email address will be recorded in the University's electronic directories and records for that student.

Students are expected to check their UW Oshkosh official email account on a frequent and consistent basis in order to remain informed of University-related communications. The University recommends checking email at least twice per week. "I didn't check my email," errors in forwarding email, or email returned to the University with "mailbox full" or "user unknown" are not acceptable reasons for missing official University communications via email.

Since faculty and instructional academic staff determine how email is used in their classes, they can require students to check their email on a specific or more frequent basis. Faculty and instructional academic staff messages sent to class lists, including class lists for D2L courses, are also considered official communication.

In general, email is not appropriate for transmitting sensitive or confidential information unless it is matched by an appropriate level of security or permission. All use of email will be consistent with other University policies, including UW Oshkosh Acceptable Use of Computing Resources Policy: http://www.uwosh.edu/acs/policies/acceptable-use-policy. All use of email will also be consistent with local, state and federal law, including the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

Students may elect to redirect (auto forward) messages sent to their UW Oshkosh official student email account to a non-University account. Students who redirect email from their official account to a non-University account (such as AOL, Yahoo, Hotmail), however, do so at their own risk. Having email lost as a result of redirection does not absolve a student from the responsibilities associated with communication sent to her or his official email account. The University is not responsible for the handling of email by outside vendors or unofficial servers.

The University provides a WebMail system, through which students from off campus can access their official UW Oshkosh email account. Instructions for the use of WebMail are available at: http://www.uwosh.edu/titanapps/email.

I. Electronic Submission of Grades

Students may view their grades and print grade reports using the TitanWeb Registration System. The Registrar's Office does not mail grade reports to students. If there is hesitancy on the part of the student (or third party to which the TitanWeb grade report is sent) to accept the electronic version as official, the student is advised to request an official transcript from the Registrar's Office located in Dempsey Hall 130.

Since the submission of grades by instructors and posting of grades by the Registrar's Office are processes occurring throughout the academic year, a student's grade point average may change. This is particularly true if a student repeats courses.

J. Credit for Prior Learning

The University has a Credit for Prior Learning Policy which formally recognizes course work acquired through non-formal learning. For policy requirements, please contact the college from which you are requesting credit.

Credit for prior learning through portfolio assessment is an available option at the undergraduate level at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. A learning portfolio is a formal document that identifies the knowledge and skill acquired through non-formal learning, and provides evidence to support a request for credit. Credit for prior learning is not granted for the experience itself, but for the verifiable learning outcomes which grew out of the experience. This credit can be granted for demonstrated learning that results from life experiences (e.g., employment, volunteer work, community service, travel, military service). The student's learning should relate to a particular discipline, academic program or field of study at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, and reflect a balance of theoretical and practical learning appropriate to the subject matter. The learning which occurred as a result of these experiences must be validated in accordance with this policy to ensure it is equivalent to that acquired at the college level in terms of quality and outcomes.

Evaluation of credit for prior learning through portfolio assessment shall follow college guidelines which must be consistent with this University Policy, and with assessment principles outlined by the University Assessment Committee. These guidelines outline the assessment process for the college program areas, establish criteria for the number of credits to be awarded, and set standards for assessment based on established department and college learning outcomes. College guidelines must outline practices for validation at both the departmental/program and college levels and establish a process for student appeal of the final decision.

  1. The portfolio is a formal document that identifies the knowledge and skills acquired as a result of non-university experiences and that provides evidence to support these claims. Students wishing to apply for credit using the portfolio option must, with consent of instructor, enroll in Assessment of Prior Learning (Interdisciplinary Studies 145). This course will establish guidelines for portfolio construction. The use of ePortfolio is encouraged; training for this process will be made available.

  2. After successfully completing this course, students who wish to apply for credit for prior learning must submit their portfolios for assessment to the relevant departments or programs where they are seeking credit. The portfolios must be prepared according to guidelines established in Interdisciplinary Studies 145 and meet the guidelines of the relevant departments or programs. Additional portfolios may be submitted in subsequent semesters without re-enrollment in the course. Portfolios must be submitted prior to the student’s senior year.

  3. Upon receiving a portfolio for review, a department appointed assessor in the relevant discipline must assess prior learning in accordance with college guidelines to determine if the learning which occurred as a result of the identified life experiences is equal to university-level learning, and sufficient to meet expectations in a particular course presently offered by the University. An assessor is a member of the department in which the student is seeking credit. Training for assessors will be provided to ensure consistent application across disciplines. The assessor conducting the review will indicate the specific course(s) for which the credit is to be awarded.

  4. Upon assessment of learning and determination of credits to be awarded, the assessor will submit the evaluation to the appropriate college department chair or equivalent; it will then be forwarded to the dean or equivalent for validation.

  5. Once the college or equivalent validates credits earned, it will forward the evaluation form to the appropriate administrative office in LLCE, which will then forward the information to the Registrar’s Office. If the department or college does not validate the award of credits for prior learning, it will notify both the department and the student in writing.

  6. Upon receipt of written notification from the college denying validation of credits for prior learning, the student may invoke the college or equivalent’s appeal process.

The University will grant a maximum of 24 credits for prior learning through portfolio assessment. Credit for prior learning may not be applied to courses in which a student has already earned a grade. No grade will be attached to the credit received for prior learning.
Portfolio reviewers will receive a stipend for each portfolio examination. A fee to defray the costs incurred for the preparation and examination of the portfolio will be borne by the student.

To qualify for credit for prior learning, the student:

  • Must be enrolled as a student at UW Oshkosh.

  • Must be an undergraduate student in good standing.

K. Student Complaints Against Faculty and Academic Staff

Students who have complaints against faculty or academic staff have two procedures they may follow if the alleged misconduct is not judged serious enough to seek dismissal. 
The two procedures are as follows:

  1. A student who believes that the staff member has violated University rules, professional ethics or performed in a way warranting disciplinary procedures, may start proceedings in a formal manner by preparing a written complaint to be submitted to the Chancellor or his designee.

  2. A student with a complaint about classroom treatment, grades or other matters will normally wish to seek resolution of the matter informally as follows:

    1.  Meet with the staff member. Most complaints are resolved this way.

    2.  Should the complaint not be resolved by this meeting, the student next meets with the staff member's supervisor.

      The supervisor is in the Dean's Office in the College of Nursing and the College of Business. For the College of Letters and Science, the College of Education and Human Services, and the Graduate School, the supervisor is the Department Chairperson. For the Division of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement (LLCE) it is the  Assistant Vice Chancellor.

    3.  The staff member's supervisor will give the student written procedures covering complaints. The supervisor will determine the facts, and try to mediate between staff member and student and resolve the complaint.

    4.  Should the supervisor's efforts be unsatisfactory to the student, the written procedures provide more formal steps. The student must prepare a written complaint for a grievance committee within a specified time period. Inaction by the student at this point indicates that the complaint has been dropped.

Should the student be unsure as to the choice of procedure (1 versus 2 above), it is advisable to discuss the matter with personnel in the Dean of Students office.

L. Independent Study and Related Readings

The purpose of Independent Study is to allow a student to explore in-depth topics of scholarly interest, which are not attainable through University course work.

Related readings permit the student to pursue research usually well beyond that required in established courses. Before beginning the course, the student must present a bibliography of readings that he/she and the instructor have agreed upon and which are to be reviewed and discussed. The outcome is a research paper critiqued by the instructor.

Independent Study offerings are not to be used as a substitution for General Education requirements.

Before registering for an IS/RR course, students must obtain the proper contract form from the department, complete it, and secure all necessary signatures. Students may count no more than 12 units (crs.) in IS/RR combined toward the 120 required for graduation. General prerequisites: Junior standing (60 units (crs.)) or above, preparation in the academic area, and grade point average of 3.0 or above. Not to exceed 3 units (crs.) in any academic term.

Special Limitations for IS/RR within the various colleges:

College of Letters & Science

  • Psychology 446 A maximum total of 6 units (crs.) of IS/RR and Special Problems in Psychology may be counted in meeting the minimum unit (cr.) requirements of any Psychology major or minor.

  • Chemistry 446 Independent Study/Research course in Chemistry and Chemistry 456 Related Readings/Chemistry course maximum of 9 units (crs.)

  • Art 446 (May be repeated) Independent Study/Art course - maximum of 3 units (crs.)

M. Correspondence Courses

A maximum of 16 units (crs.) earned by correspondence may be applied toward a degree at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Questions concerning accreditation of another college and its correspondence course offerings should be directed to the Transfer Evaluator in the Admissions Office at University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Upon completion of a correspondence course, the student must request that an official transcript be sent from the college offering the course to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh.
A student who has paid full-time fees at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh is entitled to a waiver of course fees (but not administrative fees or text costs) for University of Wisconsin Extension correspondence courses taken concurrently with full-time course work at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Evidence of payment of full-time fees must be obtained from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Cashier's Office and included with the University of Wisconsin Extension application. If a fee waiver is desired, a student must obtain written approval from any advisor in the Undergraduate Advising Resource Center prior to taking the course.

N. Admission to Professional Programs

The professional programs within the Colleges of Education and Human Services, Nursing and Business require completion of special courses and achievement of minimum grade levels before continuation at the upper level is permitted. The following table lists those requirements. Any questions about admission to these professional programs should be directed to the appropriate college office.

ADMISSION TO PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS

College

Education and Human Services

Nursing

Business

Professional Programs

Elementary Education, Secondary Education, Special Education, Dual- Elementary/Special Education

Human Services
Leadership 
(HSL)

Nursing

Business

Units (crs.) earned before admitted

40

60

45

54

Overall GPA needed

**2.75

HSL GPA of 2.50 = cum.
2.75 = major

2.75*

2.50

Special grade requirements

See COEHS (PEP) Admission requirements

See HSL Admission requirements

"C" or better in pre-nursing courses

2.50 GPA in pre-business core courses and C or better

Maximum number accepted

Limited enrollment

Not applicable

Limited enrollment

Not applicable

Clinical Internship

Admission to the college

Admission to the program

Admission to the program

Not applicable

Student Teaching/Advanced Internship

A 3.00 GPA in the major, minor, all education course work, and cumulative (combined)

Apply after completion of all HSL Core Courses with a GPA of 3.00 in HSL courses and cumulative overall GPA of 2.75.

Not applicable

Not applicable

Health Exam

Required on file for program entry

Required on file for all field experiences (TB testing only)

Required for admission (including immunization) CPR certification

Not applicable

Program Appeal for Readmission

Admission Committee

Admission Committee

Academic Standing Committee

Readmission Appeal Review Committee

Application deadline

Program Entry September 15 for fall term review and admission; February 15 for spring term review and admission.
Student Teaching March 1 for fall term admission; October 1 for spring term admission

March 1 for fall and summer terms admission; October 1 for spring term admission

January 30 for fall term admission; August 30 for spring term admission

Applications are accepted during the term in which the student will complete 54 units (crs.) and the pre-business courses.

*In the event that more than the maximum students that can be accommodated meet the minimum requirements, they will be ranked in order by grade point for the selection. See College of Nursing admissions/progression policy.

**May vary from term to term in the event that more than the maximum students meet the minimum requirements. Due to enrollment management, not all students who meet minimum requirements may be admitted. Enrollment management is in effect for all teacher licensure majors. For more information Contact: the Professional Education Program (PEP) Office, 
Phone: 920-424-0115
Nursing Education113.

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All information pertaining to academic fees and dates may be subject to change after publication of this bulletin. It is the student's responsibility to verify the accuracy of the information before acting on it.

RESIDENCY DETERMINATION

Section 36.27 of the Wisconsin Statutes sets forth the conditions under which a student qualifies as a resident of Wisconsin for tuition purposes. Students are classified as residents or non-residents at the time of admission to the University. Non-residents are apprised of their residency status at the time of acceptance. This determination remains unchanged until such time as the student may qualify as a resident under Chapter 36.27 of the Wisconsin Statutes.

A change in residence classification is not an automatic procedure. The student requesting a change must file the necessary forms and provide satisfactory proof of bona fide residency in Wisconsin. The required forms and information can be obtained by contacting the Office of the Registrar, Dempsey Hall 130.

ESTIMATED COLLEGE COSTS

Following are the estimated average costs used for an unmarried undergraduate for the 2014-15 academic year. Students planning for the 2015-2016 academic year should include an increase in costs, depending on inflation.

 
Wisconsin Resident
Non-Resident
Commuter (living with Parents)
Tuition and Fees (Estimated)
$7,500
$15,060
$7,500
Books and Supplies
$1,000
$1,000
$1,000
Room and Board
$7,000
$7,000
NA
Miscellaneous and Travel
$2,700
$2,700
$2,700

TOTAL UNIVERSITY FEES

The following fee information applies to Spring 2015. When determined and released by the Board of Regents (after press time), new fee information for 2015-16 and 2016-17 will be available in the Student Accounts Office, Dempsey Hall 236. For further information, call (920) 424-1332.

165 Credit Policy

Wisconsin resident undergraduate students who have earned 165 credits (or 30 credits more than required for their degree programs, whichever is greater) will be charged a surcharge, equal to 100 percent of the regular resident tuition, on credits beyond that level. The surcharge will be applied to students in the semester following the one in which they reach the earned credit limit. 
This policy covers all Wisconsin resident undergraduate students pursuing their first Bachelors degree, including students pursuing a double major. Minnesota residents and non-residents, graduate, post-baccalaureate, and non-degree students are not affected. This policy applies to all credits earned at UW System and Wisconsin Technical College System transfer credits accepted toward a degree. Retroactive, AP, military and other college transfer credits do not count toward the total.

Spring 2015 Term Fees

Full-Time
Wisconsin Resident
Non-Resident
Undergraduate
(12-18 units (crs.))
$3,718.58
$7,505.06
Graduate
(9 units (crs.) and above)
$4,327.73
$8,893.16
Part-Time
 
 
Undergraduate
(1-12 units (crs.))
$309.89
$625.43
Undergraduate
(over 18 units (crs.)-per unit (cr.))
$262.43
$577.97
Graduate
(1-9 units (crs.))
$480.86
$988.13

Spring 2013 Audit Fees

Non-degree seeking
(Audit only)

$121.30 approximate per unit (cr.) undergraduate resident
$331.30 approximate per unit (cr.) undergraduate non-resident
$183.39 approximate per unit (cr.) graduate resident
$522.39 approximate per unit (cr.) graduate non-resident

Degree seeking
$309.89 approximate per unit (cr.) undergraduate resident
$625.43 approximate per unit (cr.) undergraduate non-resident
$480.86 approximate per unit (cr.) graduate resident
$988.13 approximate per unit (cr.) graduate non-resident

Program Fees

Please note: These prices are subject to change without notice. Please contact the appropriate college for more detailed information.

Accelerated Nursing Program......................... See College of Nursing 

Nursing (cost per credit)
Nursing Collaborative Program 317..................... $452.00
Nursing Collaborative Program 341..................... $452.00
Nursing Collaborative Program 434..................... $452.00
Nursing Collaborative Program 437..................... $452.00
Nursing Collaborative Program 444..................... $452.00
Nursing Collaborative Program 495..................... $452.00

Center for New Learning courses.........$360.00 per credit

NOTES:
1. Any outstanding balance will be subject to a 1 percent per month finance charge assessed on the remaining balance. Paying the bill in full by the due date will assure that the 1 percent finance charge will not be added to the next bill. All bills must be paid in full by the final due date in order to avoid being withdrawn from the University and being assessed additional collection fees.

2. Caution: Dropping and adding classes may increase your cost. Dropped courses after the 100 percent refund periods are included in the total credits used for fee calculation. Course drops and adds after the 100 percent refund periods do not offset each other for cost purposes; therefore, your semester cost may increase.

3. A surcharge for graduate business courses in the amount of $30.78 per unit (cr.) up to a maximum of $277.02 must be added to the fees displayed to determinate total cost.

4. Wisconsin residents meeting certain conditions and receiving Federal Old Age Survivors and Disability insurance benefits (OASDI) are not charged fees for auditing courses. Proof of benefits must be provided to Student Accounts, Dempsey Hall, Room 236.

5. The University does accept Wisconsin Higher Education Bonds; however, presentation of the bond(s) for redemption does not constitute payment on account. The student may be subject to all fines, penalties and administrative action. Bonds should be presented for redemption at least 45 days prior to the start of classes.

6. Additional mandatory special course fees are listed below by the respective course number.

Special Course Fees

(Non-Refundable, Subject to Change Without Notice)

Art
Most art classes have an associated special course fee assessed. Please see the "Notes" section of the class on TitanWeb, the Art Department website or the Student Account's website for a complete listing of art special course fees.

Biology
Biology 104....................................................... $13.50
Biology 325....................................................... $18.50
Biology 367....................................................... $13.00
Biology 376....................................................... $25.00
Biology 386....................................................... $13.00
Biology 525....................................................... $18.50
Biology 576....................................................... $25.00

Business
Business 384.................................................... $15.00

Communication
Communication 307....................................... $15.00

Education                                                           
Educational Leadership 308/508.................. $25.00
Educational Leadership 325.........................  $25.00
Educational Leadership 525.........................  $25.00
Educational Leadership 460.........................  $25.00
Educational Leadership 620.........................  $25.00
Educational Leadership 752.........................  $25.00
Educational Leadership 754.........................  $25.00
Educational Leadership 755.........................  $25.00          
Elementary Education 316............................ $35.00
Counselor Education 201.............................. $15.00
Counselor Education 202.............................. $30.00

Environmental Studies
Environmental Studies 282........................... $20.00
Environmental Studies 320........................... $30.00
Environmental Studies 395......................... $335.00 
Environmental Studies 396......................... $335.00

Geology
Geology 102.................................................... $10.00
Geology 109.................................................... $10.00
Geology 110.................................................... $10.00
Geology 140.................................................... $20.00
Geology 150.................................................... $10.00
Geology 205.................................................... $15.00
Geology 206.................................................... $15.00
Geology 308.................................................... $20.00
Geology 309.................................................... $35.00
Geology 311.................................................... $10.00
Geology 314.................................................... $15.00
Geology 320.................................................... $15.00
Geology 322.................................................... $35.00
Geology 326.................................................... $10.00
Geology 328.................................................... $35.00
Geology 331.................................................... $25.00
Geology 333.................................................... $10.00
Geology 335...................................................... $5.00
Geology 365.................................................... $10.00
Geology 366...................................................... $5.00
Geology 369.................................................... $10.00

Kinesiology

Kinesiology 104............................................... $35.00
Kinesiology 180............................................... $25.00
Kinesiology 189............................................... $10.00
Kinesiology 241............................................... $55.00
Kinesiology 280............................................... $10.00
Kinesiology 287............................................... $10.00
Kinesiology 289............................................... $10.00
Kinesiology 331............................................... $10.00
Kinesiology 350............................................... $10.00
Kinesiology 387............................................... $10.00
Kinesiology 389............................................... $10.00
Kinesiology 401............................................... $10.00 
Kinesiology 407............................................... $10.00
Kinesiology 461............................................... $10.00

Music
In addition to regular academic fees, an applied music instruction fee of $180.00 per unit (credit hour) will be charged to all students enrolled for private lessons in vocal or instrumental music who have not registered for a large ensemble (band, choir, orchestra). This applied music fee is not assessed at the time of enrollment. This fee will be assessed by the 4th week of the term and billed on the second statement of the term.

Music 147........................................................ $15.00
Music 148........................................................ $15.00
Music 149........................................................ $15.00
Music 150........................................................ $15.00
Music 176........................................................ $15.00
Music 214........................................................ $15.00
Music 275........................................................ $15.00
Music 276........................................................ $15.00
Music 277........................................................ $15.00
Music 305........................................................ $15.00
Music 357........................................................ $15.00
Music 358........................................................ $15.00
Music 359........................................................ $15.00
Music 375........................................................ $15.00
Music 377........................................................ $15.00
Music 410........................................................ $15.00

Nursing
Nursing 204................................................. $1350.00
Nursing 208................................................... $166.00
Nursing 212................................................... $166.00

Radio/TV/Film
R-TV-F 305........................................................ $30.00
R-TV-F 434........................................................ $10.00

2015-16 Housing Information

Room
Cost
Double
$2,050
Double Taylor
$2,330
Single $2,836
Single Taylor
$3,044
Design Single
$2,650
Horizon 2 Bedroom 
$2,987
Horizon 3 Bedroom $3,100

Please see Dining Services for a list of meal plans. Students with 14-week contracts pay no extra charge for housing during the 3-week term. Contact Residence Life and Dining Services Offices regarding refund policies and 3-week interim contracts.

Online Fees

(Non-Refundable, Subject to Change Without Notice)

Some courses that are 100 percent online are assessed a $50.00 per credit online fee. These courses, as of Spring 2015, are as follows:

Communication 101      Journalism 224     Nursing 704
Communication 426 Journalism 239 Nursing 708
Communication 433 Kinesiology 170 Nursing 711
Computer Science 125 Kinesiology 171 Nursing 809
English 213 Music 102 Political Science 105
English 218 Nursing 105 Political Science 115
English 231 Nursing 200 Psychology 101
English 302 Nursing 362 Public Administration 102
English 309 Nursing 440 Women's Studies 201
English 316 Nursing 451  
Journalism 221 Nursing 702  

Please note that some of the courses listed above are not offered online and therefore, would not be subject to an online fee.

Transcript Fee

(Subject to change)

Official transcripts are available through the Registrar's Office, Dempsey Hall 130. Cost is $10.00 per copy (three to five days processing) or $12.00 per copy for in-person processing. Payment is due at the time of request, and the student's signature is required. Online ordering is available through Credentials Inc.  Detailed transcript request information can be found at: http://www.uwosh.edu/registrar/for-students/transcripts
Contact: Records Office, Dempsey 130
Phone: (920) 424-1199
Web: http://www.uwosh.edu/registrar/for-students/transcripts

Charges for Credit by Examination

Test fees for CLEP and DANTES exams are subject to change by the national testing companies. For current fees, contact Testing Services.
Contact: Testing Services 
Phone: (920) 424-1432

Library Fees

Library charges are levied for overdue and lost books.

Residence Hall Fees

Each student living in the residence halls has the opportunity to purchase a Virtual Hall Activity Card for $25.00, which allows the resident an all-access pass to a variety of items at the hall’s main desk. The activity card can be purchased by (1): filling out the form located in the mailing with your room assignment, mailing the completed form and your check for $25 (payable to USRH) by August 1st to: Leadership Development Specialists, Department of Residence Life, 800 Algoma Blvd., Oshkosh, WI 54901 – 8689; or (2) logging into your student portal account at portal.housing.uwosh.edu and entering your login information. The login information will be the same as your titan mail account. Once you are logged in you will need to click on the myFrontdesk tab (module) located on the top of the web page. You then need to click on the Buy Now button to purchase your activity card. The charge will be $26, which includes a $1.00 service fee for online ordering.

Payment Information

(Subject to change without notice)

Payment Date

Payment of fees is due on the published due date. Students on the Partial Payment Plan pay 10 percent of all costs at that time while all others pay 100 percent.

Payment Location

Payments may be made by cash or check (payable to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh). Payments may be mailed, deposited in the wall depository next to the Cashier's Office or made in person at the Cashier's Office. Charge card payments are only accepted through TitanWeb. Accepted credit cards are MasterCard, American Express and Discover. You can also pay by e-check through TitanWeb. There will be a convenience fee of 2.5 percent assessed for all credit card payments and a 50-cent charge for e-check payments. The Cashier's Office is located in Dempsey Hall 236 and the mailing address is 800 Algoma Blvd., Oshkosh, WI 54901.

Partial Payment Plan

All students are encouraged to enroll in the Partial Payment Plan as a way to give them more time to pay their bill. If the Plan is activated, the student can pay the eligible charges in three installments during the fall and spring terms and two installments during the summer term. 

To enroll in the Partial Payment Plan, go to the Student Center in Titan Web. Under the Finances Section, you will find the link to electronically read and sign the Payment Plan.

Student Accounts

Dempsey Hall 236, 800 Algoma Blvd., Oshkosh, WI 54901
Office hours Monday through Friday 7:45 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Phone: (920) 424-1332
Email:

Fee Refunds

(Subject to change without notice)

Refund of fees is based on the date of official drop or withdrawal. The refund schedule below covers academic fees and applies to withdrawing students or students dropping courses below the full-time level.

Course Length
Week of Course and % of Refund
1
2
3
4
5
3 Weeks
100%
25%
0
0
0
7 Weeks
100%
50%
0
0
0
10 Weeks
100%
50%
25%
0
0
14 Weeks
100%
100%
50%
50%
0
17 Weeks
100%
100%
50%
50%
0

To students who receive financial aid, federal regulations governing these programs may require a larger refund to federal funding sources than the amount specified by the refund policy. The student will be responsible for the difference. If you have any questions, contact the Student Accounts Office, Dempsey 236, or call (920) 424-1332.

Federal Financial Aid Return Policy for Withdrawals*

Return to Title IV Funds Policy or What happens if I withdraw from all my classes? 

A student may find it necessary to withdraw from all classes during a semester. The student may be eligible to receive a refund of tuition and course fees depending upon the timing of the withdrawal.

If circumstances cause a student to withdraw from all classes, they are encouraged to contact their academic advisor AND the financial aid office so their decision will be based on a clear understanding of the consequences of withdrawing from all classes. 

Determining Aid Earned

If a student withdraws from UW Oshkosh, then the school, or the student, or both may be required to return some or all of the federal funds awarded to the student for that semester. The federal government requires a return of Title IV federal aid that was received if the student withdrew on or before completing 60% of the semester. Federal funds, for the purposes of this federal regulation, include Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, Subsidized Stafford Loans, Perkins Loans, and Parent PLUS Loans. The formula used in this federal "return of funds" calculation divides the aid received into earned aid and unearned aid.

A student "earns" financial aid in proportion to the time s/he is enrolled up to the 60% point. The percentage of federal aid to be returned (unearned aid) is equal to the number of calendar days remaining in the semester when the withdrawal takes place divided by the total number of calendar days in the semester. If a student was enrolled for 20% of the semester before completely withdrawing, 80% of federal financial aid must be returned to the aid programs. If a student stays through 50% of the semester, 50% of federal financial aid must be returned.

For a student who withdraws after the 60% point-in-time, there is no unearned aid. However, a school must still complete a Return calculation in order to determine whether the student is eligible for a post-withdrawal disbursement.

Return of Title IV Federal Financial Aid

Once the amount of unearned federal aid is calculated, the UW Oshkosh repayment responsibility is the lesser of that amount or the amount of unearned institutional charges. The school satisfies its responsibility by repaying funds in the student's package in the following order:

  • Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
  • Subsidized Stafford Loan
  • Perkins Loan
  • Parent PLUS Loan
  • Pell Grant
  • FSEOG
  • Other Title IV Grant Funds
Keep in mind that when Title IV funds are returned, the student borrower may owe a balance to the institution and/or the U.S. Department of Education. If a student fails to repay grant funds, s/he may be ineligible for future federal financial aid.

Unofficial Withdrawal Policy or What happens if I never officially withdraw?

Students are defined as unofficially withdrawn for Title IV Federal Aid purposes when they do not have any grades for the semester other than F’s, failing grades.

Identification Process

A final grade of “F” is assigned by instructors failing students. When instructors assign an “F”grade they are asked to report the last known date of attendance, if possible.

At the end of each semester, a report is generated of all students who have Title IV federal aid and who have a semester GPA of 0.00. Those students who have all “F‘s” are assumed to be ‘unofficially withdrawn'.

Administrative Action

The report is reviewed for those students with federal and state aid whom are assumed to have unofficially withdrawn from the University. The last date of attendance as reported by any of the instructors is determined and used in the Return of Title IV Funds calculation.

If a last day of attendance cannot otherwise be determined, the student is assumed to have attended 50% of the enrollment period and the formula is calculated based on that length of attendance.

Students will be billed for resulting institutional charges and repayments of federal and/or state financial aid.

University Refund Policy for Withdrawals**

Prior to:
Term Begin
100%
    Week 1 
100%
    Week 2 
100%
    Week 3 
50%
   
Week 4
50%
   
After Week 4
0%

* The percentages reflect the percent of Financial Aid that must be returned by the University.
** The percentages reflect the percent the tuition cost will be reduced as a result of the withdrawal.

These schedules do not match; therefore, the student will owe the University the difference between the Refund percentage (**) and the Return percentage (*).

Example:
A student is enrolled in 12 credits. The fees are $1731.35. The financial aid disbursed to pay these fees was $2667.50 in a Stafford Loan. The student withdraws from the credits at the end of the third week, Sept. 24. He has attended 21 days or 18 percent of the semester (21 days attended/115 days in semester) and therefore has earned 18 percent of the aid disbursed to him (.18*$2667.50=$480.15). The total amount of aid to be returned is the amount disbursed less the amount earned, $2187.35 ($2667.50-$480.15=$2187.35). The University must calculate the portion of the total unearned aid that it must return from the students account. Since the student has earned 18 percent, then 82 percent is unearned. 82 percent of the University’s fees are therefore unearned and $1419.71 ($1731.35*.82=$1419.71). The University’s refund policy states that through week three, the University will refund 50 percent of the tuition fees, which in this case is $865.00. The University is required to refund $1419.71 to the loan but the student’s account only has $865.00 in available credit. When the University returns the $1419.71, the student will owe the University $554.71. Refunds of campus housing and meal charges are made on a prorated basis computed weekly. Students must check out of the residence halls according to procedures available at the main desk in each hall. The check out date will be used to determine charges and refunds for housing.

Students enrolled at more than one University of Wisconsin System institution may combine units (crs.) taken in order to determine their full time status and fee assessment. Present evidence of fees paid and units (crs.) being taken with a request for reimbursement of fees paid in excess of full-time to the Student Accounts Office, Dempsey Hall 236. Call (920) 424-1332 for information.

Appeals

Appeals for exception to any of the fee payment policies and procedures must be made in writing to the Student Accounts Office, Dempsey Hall 236.

Administrative Charges

(Subject to change without notice)

Board of Regents fee policy requires prompt payment of all University fees. A required administrative fee may be assessed in the following circumstances:

When payment is made after the published due date, a $75.00 charge will be assessed.

Courses may be withdrawn if fees are still outstanding after the published due date of the term. Withdrawal refers only to your registration. The amount unpaid may still be due.

Cash Handling Procedures Related to University Transactions

Normally payments of fees, room, board, special course charges and other miscellaneous costs are made to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and presented to the Cashier's Office located in Dempsey Hall 236.

Any questions regarding fees and fee payment should be directed to Student Accounts (920) 424-1332.

Financial Aid

Financial aid at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh is awarded primarily on the basis of financial need. Need is defined as the difference between anticipated educational costs and the contribution expected from the students and their families. Parents are expected to contribute from available income and assets; students from savings and earnings. Expected parent and student contributions are computed according to the Federal Need Analysis Methodology. By completing and submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), students and their families provide the Financial Aid Office with information necessary to evaluate the student's financial need. The University attempts to meet that need from available funds.

Applying for Financial Aid

The UW Oshkosh Financial Aid Office uses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The student may apply on the internet (www.fafsa.gov) or use the paper application, which can be requested by calling: 
800-4-FEDAID.
Note: For faster processing time, please apply online.

Applications (or renewal forms) for a given academic year should be completed and filed as soon as possible preceding the application term (see guidelines on the FAFSA).

UW Oshkosh has a priority filing date of March 15. Applications received at the national processing center by that date will receive priority processing and if eligible, the applicant can expect to receive awards from aid sources that are limited. Please note that the applicant may be required to turn in additional information to the Financial Aid Office before their application can be processed.  Applications received after the priority date will be processed in the order received and awards will be based on availability of funds.
Students must also have applied for and be admitted before an award notification will be made.

Notification

Applications are processed and notification is sent as soon as possible after federal, state and local awarding formulas are determined.

The Aid Package

Financial aid applicants are evaluated for all the types of aid administered by the Financial Aid Office. It is not necessary to apply separately for each kind of aid desired. Financial aid offered to students may be in the form of grants (gifts), long-term loans and part-time employment. The typical award is made up of one or more of the following federal or state programs.

Programs Based on Financial Need

Students must meet all of the following eligibility requirements to qualify for federal and state funds:
- demonstrate financial need
- be a US citizen or eligible non-citizen
- enroll in a degree or teacher certification program
- not owe a re-payment on a grant
- not be in default status on a loan
- meet academic progress standards
- meet Selective Service requirements 
- have valid Social Security number

Federal Pell Grant

This award ranges from approximately $591 - $5,775 and is prorated for less than 12 unit (cr.) enrollment.

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grants (SEOG)

This grant is awarded to students with Pell Grant eligibility and exceptional need.

Indian Grant

This award for Native American students is funded jointly by the Federal Bureau of Indian Affairs (or contracting tribes) and the State of Wisconsin. Recipients must be at least one-fourth American Indian as certified by the appropriate Indian agency. Only residents of the State of Wisconsin can qualify for the state portion of this grant. Non-residents may qualify for the federal portion depending upon the disposition of the contracting tribe. Certification forms are available from the Financial Aid Office, tribal offices or the Wisconsin Higher Educational Aids Board.

Wisconsin Higher Education Grant

This state grant is available to Wisconsin residents that qualify according to the formula set by the Higher Education Aids Board (HEAB). Awards ranged from approximately $764 to $2324.

Talent Incentive Program Grant

This state grant is awarded to freshmen students who are Wisconsin residents, meet established criteria and demonstrate exceptional financial need. It may be renewed for four years, based on financial need. Application should be made to a Wisconsin Education Opportunity Center or through nomination by the Financial Aid Office.

Non-Resident Fee Remission

This award is made to out-of-state students with financial need. Maximum value of the award may be up to the dollar difference between resident and non-resident tuition.

Lawton Undergraduate Minority Retention Grant

This University of Wisconsin System award is made to students who have reached sophomore standing and are Wisconsin or Minnesota residents who are Black, Hispanic, Native Indian or qualifying Southeast Asian.

Federal Perkins Loan

Awards are need-based. Repayment and accrual of 5 percent annual interest begins nine months after borrowers cease to be at least a half-time student. Repayment period up to 10 years.

Nursing Student Loan

This need-based loan is available only to students enrolled in the College of Nursing. Repayment and accrual of 5 percent annual interest begins nine months after the borrower ceases to be at least a half-time student in the College of Nursing.

Federal Direct Loan (Stafford Loans)

This loan is available from the US Department of Education. The Financial Aid Office notifies applicants of their eligibility. Annual loan maximums begin at $5,500 for freshmen and increase to $7,500 starting with junior year. The cumulative loan maximum is $31,000 for dependent students and $57,500 for independent students.

Interest subsidy while the student is enrolled, at least half time, is available on the portion of the loan based on financial need. Loan amounts not based on financial need will have an interest charge while the student is enrolled. Repayment begins after a six-month grace period, which starts when enrollment ceases to be at least half time.

Federal Work Study Program

This part-time employment is available to students with financial need. Most jobs are on campus with a few jobs being available at eligible non-profit off-campus agencies. Interested students should contact individual departments or check the job listings on Titan Jobs (http://www.uwosh.edu/career/students/titan-jobs).

Some Other Sources of Financial Assistance 

Financial need is not the primary requirement in some of the following forms of financial aid. Awards may be determined by parties other than the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Financial Aid Office.

Federal PLUS Loan

This loan is for parents of dependent students. It is not based on financial need; however, the loan is limited so that the student's other financial aid and this loan together do not exceed the cost of education for the term of the loan. Processing fees are charged. Repayment begins after disbursement. Interest rate is fixed (at this time). The student must apply for financial aid.

Short-Term Loan

A limited amount of Short-Term ("Emergency") Loan money is available to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh students. The maximum loan is $50 and is to be repaid in one month or less. There is no interest charged. Continued use of the Short-Term Loan Fund by students depends upon prompt repayment of these loans.

Student Assistant Employment

This is part-time employment for students on the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh campus. No financial need analysis is required. Interested students should contact individual departments or check the job listings on Titan Jobs (http://www.uwosh.edu/career/students/titan-jobs).

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

Students with physical or mental handicaps may be eligible for vocational rehabilitation benefits. Interested persons should contact D.V.R., 201 E. Washington Ave, JEF1 Room A100, P.O. Box 7852, Madison, WI 53707-7852, or the local D.V.R. office. Financial need is considered; awards are made by the respective D.V.R. offices.

High Schools and Other Community Agencies and Organizations

In most communities, financial assistance for college attendance is provided by various educational, industrial, professional and fraternal organizations. Students should check with their school counselors for further information.

International Student Scholarship

A limited number of these awards, up to the amount of non-resident tuition, are available to foreign students who have financial need. Recipients are selected by a University committee. Inquiries for new students should be directed to the Admissions Office; continuing students should contact the advisor to international students.

Minnesota - Wisconsin Reciprocity Program

This arrangement permits an eligible Minnesota resident to attend the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and pay Minnesota resident fees. Interested Minnesota residents should write to Higher Education Coordinating Commission, 400 Capitol Square Bldg., 550 Cedar Street, St. Paul, MN 55101.

Minority Teacher Forgivable Loan

The Minority Teacher Forgivable Loan is made to minority students who are in their junior or senior year of approved teacher preparation. It is limited to Wisconsin residents. A portion of the loan will be forgiven for each year spent teaching at an eligible high school.

Scholarships

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh offers non-need based scholarships including the Honors Scholarships and Minority Honor Scholarship. The Financial Aid Office has information on scholarships available to continuing students.
Scholarships are not awarded as part of a financial aid "package," but such awards, if received, are considered a student resource and may affect the amount of aid the student may receive.

Veterans Administration

Many veterans of military service are eligible for monthly benefits to attend college. Additional assistance is provided to disabled veterans. Children of deceased and disabled veterans are also eligible for benefits. Inquiries should be directed to the Regional Office of the Veterans Administration (1-888-GIBILL1) or the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Veterans' Adviser, Dempsey Hall 146D, (920) 424-1804.

Student Budgeting

Financial aid, which students receive from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, will complement the other resources of students in order to meet their total financial need. It will be the responsibility of aid recipients to budget all those resources with attention to the following considerations:

(1) Payment for tuition, fees, books, room and board should take precedence over other expenditures; (2) earnings from summer and academic term employment should be spread over the entire academic term; (3) expected parental contribution should be discussed with parents in advance of the school year (In some cases, a PLUS loan to replace the parental contribution may be appropriate); (4) changes in a family's financial circumstances should be reported to the Financial Aid Office; (5) the Financial Aid Office should be notified of special educational or emergency expenses of the student; (6) a student living in the residence hall should be aware that his/her budget is based upon the cost of a double room; no additional allowance is made for a student occupying a single room; (7) in choosing off-campus housing, the student should keep in mind financial aid budget limitations; (8) a student should not accept a loan without full consideration of repayment obligations; and (9) the Financial Aid Office can provide financial counseling.

Further Information

It should be noted that because of the number and complexity of financial aid programs, only basic descriptions of the various sources of aid can be provided here. No attempt is made to provide a comprehensive listing of all the considerations in assessing financial need and determining eligibility for funds.

Furthermore, all guidelines for administering financial aid programs are subject to change at any time as the result of legislative action or administrative mandate from the federal and state agencies responsible for the direction of the programs.

The awarding of financial aid to students depends upon each student's eligibility and the availability of funds. If funds are exhausted, eligibility is meaningless. As funds are often insufficient to meet the need, the importance of early application cannot be overemphasized.

Contact: Financial Aid Office, Dempsey Hall 104. 
Phone: (920) 424-3377
E-Mail: 
Web Site: www.uwosh.edu/fin_aid/
Other Resources
www.fafsa.ed.gov
www.studentaid.ed.gov
Net Price Calculator:
www.uwosh.edu/vsacalculator/financial-aid-award-estimator

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Academic and Student Services

Administrative, Education and Support Services; Student Activities and Orangizations; and Residence Life

ADMINISTRATIVE, EDUCATIONAL AND SUPPORT SERVICES

Academic and Student Services

Academic and Student Services are intended to help students with their personal, academic and vocational development, and to help them become informed, responsible decision-makers. These services are designed to complement the teaching mission of the University. 

Academic Advising (UARC)

The Undergraduate Advising Resource Center (UARC) is located on the second floor of the Student Success Center. The office staff is available to serve all University undergraduate students, faculty and staff from 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, twelve months a year. Hours are extended during peak periods as announced on the web 

www.uwosh.edu/advising.

All undergraduate students are assigned an adviser in the Undergraduate Advising Resource Center when they meet advising criteria for their major established by the department/college. Graduate students are assigned an adviser from their appropriate academic program.

The advisers in the Undergraduate Advising Resource Center work with faculty from colleges and departments in order to best assist students in the development of academic goals and strategies for success in meeting College and University graduation requirements. Their responsibilities include: advising new students regarding appropriate courses consistent with their interests, skills, values, high school record, ACT results, majors/minors of interest and academic and career objectives; advising continuing students regarding major and career options, appropriate courses based on interests, skills, values, academic and career objectives, personal goals, financial concerns and appropriate referrals; and communication regarding overloads, late add/drops, late withdrawal from the University, course waivers/substitutions, curriculum modifications, general education/USP requirements, major/minor/degree requirements and graduation requirements. Advisers are responsible for administering College and University policy.

Contact: Undergraduate Advising Resource Center, Student Success Center, Suite 202
Phone: (920) 424-1268

Information Technology

Information Technology provides computer support to students, faculty and staff of UW Oshkosh. We provide support by maintaining:  email services, the UW Oshkosh Help Desk, six general access student computer labs, wireless services and all university-owned computers.

Students are automatically given an email account on the UW Oshkosh email server as soon as they are admitted. This email account can be accessed on or off-campus using the TitanMail link on the mail UW Oshkosh web page. Faculty, advisers and campus administrators use the assigned student email address to communicate deadlines, events and other useful information to all students. The email system also includes a web calendar to assist students in maintaining their class and work schedules, including exam deadlines. For assistance with their TitanMail account, students should contact the UW Oshkosh Help Desk.

The UW Oshkosh Help Desk is located in Dempsey 207.  It is open 7:45 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. It is also open during the Sunday and Monday of Labor Day weekend to assist students returning to campus with password changes. The Help Desk is accessible in person, by phone at (920) 424-3020, or via email at helpdesk@uwosh.edu.  Students in the Residence Halls should call ResNet/MIO at (920) 424-0863 for assistance with the computer connection in their rooms. Assistance is also provided in the general access student computer labs throughout campus.

The student computer labs are located in the basement of Clow Classroom, Halsey Science 101, Polk Library 118, Radford basement, Sage 1208 and Swart Hall 229.  The Halsey computer lab is open 24-hours during academic terms.  The over 450 computers in the labs are replaced on a 3- to 4-year cycle and include Windows, Macintosh and Linux operating systems.  To use computers in the six student computer labs, students are assigned a NetID.  The NetID is also used for wireless access and to login to campus resources, such as the course management system, Desire2Learn (D2L). 

The Presentations Lab, located in the basement of Polk Library, is another resource for students.  The lab is staffed to assist students with multimedia and graphical technology, including digital cameras available for checkout.  Student familiar with these or other technologies can apply for one of the many jobs available in Information Technology, from lab consultant to device support technician to application developer.

Additional information, including hardware recommendations, campus wireless access locations and reduced cost software information, can be found at http://www.uwosh.edu/it.

Contact: Anne Milkovich, CIO
Location: Dempsey 306B
Phone: (920) 424-4480
E-Mail: 

Career Services

The Career Services Office at UW Oshkosh provides students with a variety of career related resources, information and services. Learn about internship opportunities, access your Titan Jobs account, get help with resumes and cover letters, enroll in a Professional Skills course, attend career and networking events, search for internship and full-time positions, meet with a Career Adviser. 

Contact: Jaime Page-Stadler, Director of Career Services - Student Success Center, Suite 125
Phone: (920) 424-2181
E-Mail: cservice@uwosh.edu

Children's Learning and Care Center

Our mission is to provide exemplary early care and education through the use of early childhood best practices within a safe and caring environment for children and families in the UW Oshkosh learning community and our collaborating partners.

Because we believe that children learn best through play and active engagement in their learning environment, we purposely plan and implement meaningful experiences based on Creative Curriculum and Wisconsin Model Early Learning Standards and Guiding Principles. To assure that all children experience success, we partner with parents and use information gained from observation and individual assessment to intentionally teach and support the learning and development of each child.

The Children’s Center is located on the University campus in Lincoln Hall on the corner of Algoma Boulevard and Wisconsin Street.

For more information, check out our Web Site: www.uwosh.edu/childrens_center.

Contact: Sandra Kust, Director
Phone: (920) 424-0260
E-Mail:

Counseling Center

The Counseling Center provides free and confidential counseling services for currently enrolled UW Oshkosh students. Partners and families of currently enrolled students may be seen with them. Prospective students, UW Oshkosh Alumni and community members may be seen for career counseling on a fee for service basis.

The Counseling Center's mission is to provide psychological services to students who strive to be more effective in their academic, vocational and personal lives, thereby advancing the educational mission of the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. We provide a full spectrum of therapy services ranging from depression, suicide, anxiety disorders and substance abuse to more developmental issues such as adjustment to college life, overcoming academic success barriers and relationship concerns.

The Counseling Center also provides career counseling to assist students who are uncertain of their academic or vocational direction. A wide variety of information about occupations and educational programs is also available in the Counseling Center Library. The Center is open Monday from 8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m. and Tuesday through Friday from 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m., during the 14-week terms.  

Contact: Counseling Center – Student Success Center, Suite 240
Phone: (920) 424-2061

Dean of Students

The Dean of Students Office supports the University’s mission by providing students with services and opportunities that enhance critical thinking, an appreciation for diversity and holistic development.

The Dean of Students Office serves as a valuable point of contact for students, faculty and parents. We provide guidance and support to help students resolve disputes through problem solving and self-advocacy skills. We also assist students with emergency situations including medical withdrawals, emergency student contact, and assisting students when they must be away from campus. The Dean of Students Office provides leadership on campus by providing advocacy for victims of crime, coordinating the Student At-Risk Response Team (SARRT), and partnering with the Oshkosh community on the Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Taskforce. The office helps to coordinate special events on campus including New Student Advisement & Registration Programs, Orientation Programs, and selection of student speakers & award recipients for Commencement. The Dean of Students Office is also responsible for coordinating responses to student conduct and safety concerns on campus including violence, sexual assault, and bias-motivated incidents. The Dean of Students Office advises the Student Allocations Committee, Golden Key International Honor Society, and coordinates services for students with disabilities.

Contact: Dean of Students - Dempsey Hall 125
Phone: (920) 424-3100 
Fax: (920) 424-2405

Services for Students with Disabilities

The University provides equal access to its programs with equal challenge in the academic arena for students with disabilities. Students with disabilities may request reasonable accommodations by contacting the Assistant Dean of Students / Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities located in the Dean of Students Office in 125 Dempsey Hall. Students should register with the office at least eight weeks before classes start, but registrations may be submitted at any time. Students requesting accommodations will be required to submit necessary documentation to obtain accommodations.

Study areas with computers equipped with adaptive technology for students with visual impairments, manual dexterity difficulties or other disabilities are located in Dempsey Hall 120 and throughout the University’s general purpose computer labs.

The ADA Advisory Board is an advisory committee that includes students, faculty, staff and external stakeholders. This group provides information and recommendations to meet the needs and concerns of individuals with disabilities.

Contact: Assistant Dean of Students / Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities – 125 Dempsey Hall
Phone: (920) 424-3100
Fax: (920) 424-2405

The Center for Academic Support and Diversity

The Center for Academic Support and Diversity (CASD) offers programs and services that support matriculation, retention and graduation of multicultural and qualified, first-generation, low-income and/or disabled students.  Staff members in the CASD work closely with faculty, academic departments and other campus and community partners to provide services for students by.

  • integrating academic and student services programs

  • ensuring that students’ needs are accurately assessed and aggressively addressed

  • providing a “one-stop academic support center” and

  • maintaining a supportive and nurturing environment for all students

There are four departments within the CASD:  Precollege Programs, Multicultural Retention Programs, Student Support Services and the Multicultural Education Center.

1. Multicultural Retention Programs (MRP) provides academic and student support services to assist in the enrollment, retention and graduation of multicultural students. Programs and services offered in MRP include: advising/counseling, early warning intervention, tutoring in English and mathematics, first-year student workshops, personal, career and financial aid assistance, faculty mentoring, internship placement and referrals to other academic and student support services.

2. PreCollege Programs provide academic and personal development courses and activities to help economically-disadvantaged middle and high school students prepare for college. Seven residential sessions of precollege programs are offered which include four, one-week and three, two-week summer sessions on campus and academic activities in the spring. Six sessions focus on science, engineering, technology and mathematics, nursing, teaching, middle school reading and mathematics, accounting and other business disciplines, while the remaining session focuses on enrichment, skill building and college preparation:

        • Aspiring Pupils for Professional Leadership in Education (APPLE) – Grades 8-10
        • Exploring Science, Technology & Engineering Education Majors (ESTEEM) – Grades 8-10
        • Making Aspirations Turn to Honors (MATH) – Grade 11
        • PreCollege Enrichment Program (PEP) – Grade 8-12
        • Summer Mathematics and Reading Talent Scholars (SMARTS) – Grade 7
        • Wisconsin Youth in Nursing (WYN) – Grades 10-12
        • Young Entrepreneurial Scholars (YES) – Grades 10-12

3. Student Support Services (SSS) offers eligible students individualized assistance in the areas of: academic advising, strategies for academic success, career and major exploration, connections to campus resources and financial aid and literacy.  First-year students participate in a Learning Group which is led by upper-class SSS students. To take part, students must be citizens or permanent U.S. residents, and they must meet one of the following criteria: first-generation college student (neither parent has a four-year college degree) and/or the family has limited income. Students with disabilities may also be served.  SSS is one of the TRiO programs funded through the U.S. Department of Education.

4. Multicultural Education Center (MEC) located at 751 Algoma Boulevard, home of the Norma Shanebrook Multicultural Library, serves as a campus and community resource. The MRP provides staffing and supervision and advise the student organizations to sponsor programs and activities to increase the level of understanding and appreciation for cultural diversity on campus and in the community. The MEC also serves as a “home away from home” for all students, particularly multicultural and multiracial students, faculty and staff.  The MEC is the umbrella for the following student organizations:

        • Muticultural Education Coalition (MEC)
        • Inter-Tribal Student Organization (ITSO)
        • Asian Student Association (ASA)
        • Black Student Union (BSU)
        • Student Organization of Latinos (SOL)
        • Hmong Student Union (HSU)

The MEC is also the home of the Norma Shanebrook Multicultural Library, a special resource for the University and the larger community. The collection includes books, periodicals, pamphlets and other documents. The library focuses on various cultural groups and their relationships with European American cultures. Works in the collection focus on issues of multiculturalism, diversity, cross-culture history, racism, socialization processes and education in American society.

The MEC Open House is scheduled annually on the Sunday before Labor Day. The open house provides an opportunity to showcase the MEC to first- year students, parents and the campus community. It also provides an avenue to meet the CASD staff, student organization leaders and experience cultural diversity through food-presentation and cultural exhibitions. 

Document Services

This center provides black and white and color printing services for the production of materials related to University programs, services and purposes. The services are also available for recognized University student groups and non-profit organizations.

Business cards, envelopes and off campus printing are also available from our office.

Contact: Document Services – Campus Services Center Rm 126
Phone: (920) 424-1122
Hours: 7:30 a.m.– 4:30 p.m.

Internships

Apply what you learn. Get experience. Network. Differentiate yourself. Get an internship (or two or three).

Contact your academic department or Career Services for information.

Students in the College of Business, College of Education and Human Services Leadership and College of Nursing have required experiential learning opportunities (internships, clinical experiences or student teaching).

Students with a major in the College of Letters and Science may contact their academic department or Career Services regarding internship options. 

Legal Services

Oshkosh Student Association retains an attorney who, by appointment, is available to provide legal services to students. The student staff sponsors programs throughout the year about legal rights and responsibilities.

Contact: Student Legal Services - Reeve Union SLIC 105E
Phone: (920) 424-3202
Email: osa@uwosh.edu

Parking-Motor Vehicle Regulations

Parking on the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh campus is by permit only (except for metered spaces and pay stations). During business hours (7:45 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) parking permits may be obtained from the Parking Services Office located in the lower level of Blackhawk Commons. Visitor permits may also be purchased from University Books & More in Reeve Memorial Union during their hours of operation. Permits are not required for weekend parking from 4:00 p.m. on Friday through 6:00 a.m. on Monday (except for Disabled, Reserved or Restricted spaces). Visitors may also park on the first level of the parking ramp (except in reserved/restricted spaces) located on the corner of High and Osceola and use the pay-by-space machines. 

Contact: Parking Services Office - Lower level, Blackhawk Commons
Phone: (920) 424-4455
E-Mail: parking@uwosh.edu
Fax: (920) 424-0906

Polk Library

Polk Library (http://www.uwosh.edu/library/) provides research and educational materials, customer services, information instruction and learning spaces to students, faculty, and staff in a modern, responsive and professional manner.

Polk is home to hundreds of thousands of books, films, electronic journal collections and archival materials critical for students' success.  Beyond that, Polk's close relationship with libraries across UW System provide students convenient access to much of the total collection of all UW campus libraries, which together constitute one of the largest academic library collections in the country.

Polk's professionals provide instruction on library research and other information literacy skills in classes and through one-on-one contact with students.  Whether a student is on-campus or on-line, they are invited to chat, phone or email staff members for assistance on their research projects.

The library building has numerous areas for students to work in groups or independently.  Throughout the building there are over 100 computers and laptops available for students, study rooms with presentation technologies and even a coffee cart for a quick pick-me-up.  Scanners, printers and other specialized equipment make Polk Library a favorite "office" for student work.  The library is open over 106 hours a week, and during the last week of classes it is open 24 hours a day.

Contact: Polk Library
Phone: (920) 424-4333

Postal Services

The main campus postal operation is located in the Campus Services Bldg., 650 Witzel Ave. Students with questions related to campus mail service are welcome to stop in.

A complete postal substation is available to students and visitors at Reeve Union's Titan Central. Titan Central is open daily until 9 p.m., 8 p.m. Sunday. Fax and UPS services are available at Copy This, weekdays. Intra-campus mail delivery is provided to students between residence halls and all other campus locations.

Contact: Campus Mail Service - 650 Witzel Ave.
Phone: (920) 424-1145

Project Success

Project Success is an academic remediation program for adults with specific language-based learning disabilities and dyslexia. These students are academically able and have determination to succeed in spite of a pronounced problem in one or more of the following areas: reading, spelling, arithmetic, writing and/or speaking. Project Success students are mainstreamed into the regular university curriculum across all four colleges: Letters and Science, Education and Human Services, Business and Nursing.

Dr. Robert Nash, Professor of Education and the first Director of Project Success, started the pilot program in 1979 with seven students. Today, there are over 350 students. Academic remediation has expanded to include the areas of written expression, comprehension of written and spoken language, math and the social aspects of dyslexia. Project Success has received both national and local recognition through television, radio and the print medium.

The goals of Project Success are:

1. That each student become academically and socially independent.

2. That each student graduate from UW Oshkosh or another post secondary educational institution.

Help offered to reach these goals includes:

1. Direct remediation of reading, spelling and arithmetic deficiencies through the use of an adaptation of the Orton-Gillingham technique. The technique consists of direct instruction and other instructional practices that train the students across a summer program to simultaneously use their visual, auditory and kinesthetic senses in learning how to use the language's phonemic (sound) structure to read and spell. Our summer transition program is a prerequisite to the academic-year program for students who are not admitted in full standing.

2. Mathematics, English, Spanish, and organizational tutoring assistance throughout each term.

3. Understanding the effects of dyslexia upon one's life through an organized summer program which uses group dynamics and interaction to help participants come to an understanding of the social and psychological effects of dyslexia and to help them deal with those effects.

Applying to Project Success

Prospective students must send a handwritten letter expressing interest and requesting a Project Success application. Please include:

Name of applicant

Address

Telephone number

Name of parent/guardian (if applicable)

Those interested should apply no more than two years prior to desired entrance. The completed application will be placed on the active list for the desired entry date. Approximately one year before entrance, the applicant, with parent(s), will be scheduled for an assessment and personal interview.

Important:
Acceptance into Project Success does not grant acceptance into the University. Admission to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and acceptance into the Project Success Program is a joint but separate process. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh admissions procedures must be followed before acceptance into Project Success can be offered. The current minimum requirements for entry into the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh as a Project Success student is:

  • English 3-4 years must be in regular education curriculum

  • Math 3 years Algebra and higher-Algebra II

  • Natural Sciences 3 years

  • Social Sciences 3 years

  • Academic Electives 4 years

Contact: The Office of Admissions
University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
800 Algoma Blvd.
Oshkosh, WI 54901
Phone: (920) 424-0416

Contact: Project Success
Phone: (920) 424-1033
E-Mail: projectsuccess@uwosh.edu

Reading and Study Skills Center

The Reading and Study Skills Center offers all students from first-year to graduate level an opportunity to improve their overall academic performance through the development of more sophisticated reading and study techniques. Assistance with time management, memory, note-taking, textbook study, test preparation, test taking and reading speed and comprehension is available through credit courses, workshops, handouts, web links and staff appointments.

Students are encouraged to register for any of the following credit courses:

ACAD 100 Developmental Reading Skills (2 cr.)

ACAD 115 Strategies for Academic Recovery (2 cr.)

ACAD 125 Comprehensive Study Skills (1 cr.)

ACAD 135  Applied Study Skills (2 cr.)

ACAD 169 College Reading Strategies (1 cr.)

In addition, students may choose to participate in the following Reading and Study Skills Center programs:

  • One-hour workshops on topics such as test preparation, test taking, reading strategies, active learning techniques, note taking and preparation for the PRAXIS I/PRAXIS II and GRE exams.

  • Individual learning strategy assessment and counseling.

  • Self-help resources, including learning strategy packets, lending library, and online links.

Contact: Reading and Study Skills Center, Nursing/Education 201
Phone: (920) 424-1031
E-Mail: 

Student Health Center

The Student Health Center is located on the first floor of Radford Hall.  Primary health care is provided to all registered students when classes are in session.  Call for an appointment.  Refer to the Student Health Center website for current hours, services provided, practitioners on site and the self care guide.  There is no cost for most visits, but there is a nominal fee for procedures, lab tests, and medication.  The student health center is accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care. Accreditation is a voluntary process through which an organization is able to measure the quality of its services and performance against nationally recognized standards.  UW Oshkosh Student Health Center has been continually accredited by AAAHC since 2004. When the student health center is closed, students may seek care from our local urgent care centers at their own expense.  Our website has a list of local hospitals, urgent care centers and pharmacies.  It is recommended that all students have a copy of their health insurance coverage.
 
Contact: Student Health Center - Radford Hall
Phone: (920) 424-2424 

Web Site: www.uwosh.edu/studenthealth

Office of International Education

Study Abroad

Study abroad for a few weeks, one semester or a year earning credit in almost any field while making progress toward your degree.  Study in English, study in a foreign language or study a foreign language.  Participate on a full-immersion program, a partial immersion program or on a group program in over twenty-five countries. Intern abroad, too!  Apply Financial Aid, scholarships and/or the G.I. Bill toward your study abroad costs (visit the OIE for related advising). Study abroad grants based on financial need are also available to eligible students.

National Student Exchange (NSE)

Study at one of approximately 170 universities and colleges in the U.S. and Canada for a semester or year in almost any field while making progress toward your degree. Pay full-time tuition to UW Oshkosh, not to the host campus, making the exchange outside the state of Wisconsin affordable. There are even opportunities to study in Spanish in Puerto Rico and in French in Quebec. Apply Financial Aid, scholarships and/or the G.I. Bill toward your NSE costs.

International Students

Apply to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh to complete a degree or to study here for one or two semesters.  Degree-seeking and visiting students who meet all UW Oshkosh admissions requirements except the English language proficiency requirement may receive conditional admission to the university. These students will complete the Intensive English Program at UW Oshkosh before beginning academic coursework at UW Oshkosh.

Intensive English Program and English Language Support

Improve your English language skills by enrolling in the Intensive English Program before beginning regular university coursework and/or during the summer between semesters.  Students experiencing difficulty in regular university coursework due to the English language may also access free English language tutoring through the Center for Academic Resources (CAR).


Contact: Office of International Education, Dempsey Hall Room 202
Phone: (920) 424-0775
E-Mail: oie@uwosh.edu

Testing Services

Testing Services is located in the lower level of Polk Library Rooms 2, 3, 4 and 6. The department has two primary roles, which include testing and test scoring.

A variety of paper/pencil and computer based tests are administered by the department. These include, but are not limited to, the following examinations: The national college entrance ACT and SAT, GRE (Graduate Record Examination), LSAT (Law School Admission Test), MAT (Millers Analogies Test), NBCC (National Board of Certified Counselors), PRAXIS I/ PPST (Pre-Professional Skills Tests), PRAXIS II (Teacher Subject Assessments) and Wisconsin state regional course placement for English, Mathematics and Foreign Languages. In addition, the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) exam is administered. The GRE, PRAXIS I (PPST), and TOEFL exams are administered only in computerized format.

Residual ACT testing is also available. Examinees should be aware that exam scores for the residual ACT have very limited acceptance outside the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Test scores are available immediately after testing.

The CLEP (College Level Examination Program) and DANTES DSST(Dantes Subject Standardized Tests) examinations are administered as part of the college's unit (cr.) by examination program.

The department also provides space for year round classroom, correspondence, distance education and make-up testing. The department also provides selected vocational and professional exams leading to certification. Additional space and accommodations are available for non-standardized testing of students who meet criteria set by the Americans With Disabilities Act.

Students seeking general testing information, test registration, exam preparation or non-standard testing accommodation information may contact the department.

Contact: Testing Services - Polk Library 4
Phone: (920) 424-1432 

Cooperative Academic Partnership Program CAPP

Course NumberCourse Name
Crs.
Art 101 Elements of Studio Art 3
Art 105 Understanding the Arts 3
Biology 105 Biological Concepts-Unity
4
Biology 211 Human Anatomy 3
Biology 212 Human Physiology 4
Business 198 Introduction to Business
3
Business 231 Personal Finance 3
Chemistry 105 General Chemistry I 5
Chemistry 106 General Chemistry II
5
Communication 111 Fundamentals of Speech
3
Computer Science 142 Elementary Programming in Visual Basic
3
Computer Science 221 Object-Oriented Design and Programming I
3
Economics 106 General Economics
1
Economics 204 Principles of Macroeconomics
3
Economics 206 Principles of Microeconomics
3
English 101 College English I 3
English 211 British Literature I 3
English 213 American Literature I 3
English 214 American Literature II 3
English 225 Modern British Literature 3
English 226 Modern American Literature 3
English 227 Modern World Literature 3
French 248 Fourth Sem French for CAPP 5
French 312 Advanced French Grammar 5
German 248 Fourth Sem German for CAPP
5
German 312 Advanced German Grammar
5
Japanese 248 Fourth Semester Japanese for CAPP  Programs
5
Japanese 310 Advance Japanese I
5
Spanish 248 Fourth Sem Spanish for CAPP
5
Spanish 312 Advanced Spanish Grammar
5
Geography 111 Human Geography
3
Geology 102 Physical Geology
4
History 102 Modern Civilization
3
History 201 United States History Since 1877
3
History 202 Modern United States History Since 1877 3
Journalism 141 Introduction to Journalism and Mass Comm 3
Kinesiology 105 The Active Lifestyle 2
Mathematics 108 Pre-Calculus 5
Mathematics 109 Elementary Statistics 3
Mathematics 171 Calculus I 4
Mathematics 172 Calculus II
4
Mathematics 273 Calculus III
4
Music 102 Theory of Music/General Student 3
Music 219 Music and Culture-Optional Content 3
Philosophy 105 Ethics
3
Philosophy 109 Intro to Philosophy 3
Physical Education 221 Swimming 2
Physics/ Astronomy 107 General Physics I
5
Physics/ Astronomy 108 General Physics II 5
Physics/Astronomy 109 General Physics III
5
Political Science 105 American Govt/Politics 3
Political Science 115 International Politics 3
Psychology 101 General Psychology 3
Radio-TV-Film 114 Introduction to Media Aesthetics 3
Radio-TV-Film 120 Introduction to Audio/Radio 3
Radio-TV-Film 250 Introduction to Visual Media 3
Theatre 161 Appreciation of the Drama 3
On-Line Courses
Biology 211 Human Anatomy
4
Economics 106 General Economics
3
English 213 American Literature I
3
Kinesiology 105 The Active Lifestyle
5
Kinesiology 170 Medical Terminology
1
Mathematics 109 Elementary Statistics
3
Mathematics 171 Calculus I
4
Mathematics 172  Calculus II
4
Political Science 105 American Government & Politics
3
Psychology 101 General Psychology
3
 
Contact: CAPP
Email: CAPP@uwosh.edu 

CLEP - College Level Examination Program
Score Levels Required for Credit at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Subject Examinations
Scaled Score
CRS.
Credit Granted As
Humanities
50
6

See Coordinator of Academic Advisement (Student Success Center, 2nd  Floor)

Natural Sciences (non-lab)
50
6
Social Sciences and History
50
6
Chemistry
50-62
5
Chemistry 105 General Chemistry I.
Chemistry
63 and above
10
Chemistry 105 General Chemistry I and 106 General Chemistry II
General Biology
50
4
Biology 105 Biology Concepts-Unity
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature
50
3
Elective Credit in English

College Composition (120 min.)
(50 min. M.C., 70 min. essay)

50
3
WBIS 188 Writing Based Inquiry Seminar
History of the United States I
49
3
History 201 US History to 1877
History of the United States II
49
3
History 202 US History Since 1877
Western Civilization I
50
3
History 101 Early Civilization
Western Civilization II
48
3
History 102 Modern Civilization
Calculus 55 4 Math 171 Calculus 1
Pre-Calculus 60 3 Math 104 College Algebra
College Algebra
60
3 Math 103 Introduction to College Algebra I
College Mathematics 50 3 Elective Credit in Math
American Government
50
3
Poli Sci 105 American Government and Politics
Introductory Psychology
50
3
Psych 101 General Psychology
Introductory Sociology
50
3 Sociology 101 Introduction to Sociology
College of Business
Financial Accounting 50-59 2 Business 206 Financial Accounting
60 and above 4 Business 206 Financial Accounting and Accounting 208 Financial Accounting Cycle
Introductory Business Law 54 3 Business 321 Business Law I
Principles of Marketing 53 3 Business 371 Introduction to Marketing
Principles of Management 50 3 General Elective
Info System & Computer Applic 50 3 General Elective
College of Nursing      
Human Growth and Development
50
3
Nursing 001 Nursing I

Note: For detailed information about the CLEP program, test information, exam study guides and test registration, please call Testing Services at (920) 424-1432.

AP - COLLEGE BOARD ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM
Score Levels Required for Credit at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh


Department

AP Exam

Score

CRS

Credit Granted As

Art

Art History

3, 4 or 5

3

Art  001 Elective Credit in Art

 

2-D Design

 

 

Art Department will review portfolio for Art or General Elective Credit

 

3-D Design

 

 

Biology

Biology

3, 4 or 5

4

Biology  105 Biological Concepts-Unity

Chemistry

Chemistry

3

5

Chem  105 General Chemistry

 

 

4 or 5

10

Chem  105 Gen Chemistry and Chemistry 106 Gen Chemistry w/Qualitative Analysis

Computer Science

Computer Science A

4 or 5

3

Comp Sci  221 Intro to Programming in C++

 

Computer Science A or Computer Science AB

3

3

Comp Sci  001 Elective Credit in Computer Science

 

Computer Science AB

4 or 5

7

Comp Sci  221 Introduction to Programming in C++ and 

Comp Sci 262 Object Oriented Programming in C++

Economics

Micro Economics

3

3

Econ  001 Elective Credit in Economics

 

 

4 or 5

3

Econ  206 Principles of Economics I (micro)

 

Macro Economics

3

3

Econ  001 Elective Credit in Economics

 

 

4 or 5

3

Econ  204 Principles of Economics II  (macro)

English

English Language and Composition

3, 4 or 5

3

WBIS 188 Writing Based Inquiry Seminar

 

English Literature and Composition

3

3

English  225 Modern British Literature or Eng 226 Modern American Literature

 

 

4, 5

6

WBIS 188 Writing Based Inquiry Seminar and Eng 225 Modern British Literature or Eng 226 Modern American Literature

Foreign Languages

Chinese Language and Culture

3

3

Foreign Language Elective (HU)

 

Chinese Language and Culture

4

3

Foreign Language Elective (HU) – Students seeking a BA degree will have the foreign language requirement waived.

 

Chinese Language and Culture

5

6

Foreign Language Elective (HU) – Students seeking a BA degree will have the foreign language requirement waived.

Foreign Languages

French Language

3

3

French  203 Intermediate Structure and Expression I. Placement into French 204. If student earns a grade of B or better upon course completion, 8 additional retroactive credits are awarded for French 110 & 111.

 

French Language

4

3

French  204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II. Placement into French 301 Advanced Conversation. If a grade B or better is earned upon course completion, 11 additional retroactive credits awarded for French 110, 111 and 203.

 

French Language

5

6

French  204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II. Placement into French 304 Advanced Conversation. If a grade B or better is earned upon course completion, 11 additional retroactive credits awarded for French 110, 111 and 203.

Foreign Languages

French Literature

3

3

French 203 Intermediate Structure and Expression I. Placement into French  204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II. If a grade of B or better is earned upon course completion, 8 add. retroactive credits are awarded for French 110 & 111.

 

French Literature

4 or 5

6

French  204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II and French 301 Advanced Conversation. Placement into 300 level literature course. If a grade of B or better is earned upon course completion, 13 additional retroactive credits are awarded for French 110, 111 and 203.

Foreign Languages

German Language

3

3

German 203 Intermediate Structure and Expression I. Placement into German  204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II. If a grade of B or better is earned upon course completion, 8 add. retroactive credits are awarded for German 110 & 111.

 

German Language

4

3

German  204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II (Placement in German 301) If grade of B or better is earned, 13 additional retroactive credits for German 110, 111 and 203 will be awarded)

 

 

German Language

5

6

German  204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II and 300 level German course (Placement in German 304) If grade of B or better is earned, 13 additional retroactive credits for German 110, 111 and 203 will be awarded.

Foreign Languages

Italian Language and Culture

3

3

Foreign Language Elective (HU)

 

Italian Language and Culture

4

3

Foreign Language Elective (HU) – Students seeking a BA degree will have the foreign language requirement waived.

Italian Language and Culture

5

6

Foreign Language Elective (HU) – Students seeking a BA degree will have the foreign language requirement waived.

Foreign Languages

Japanese Language and Culture

3

3

Japanese 210 Introduction to Japanese III. Placement into Japanese 211 Intermediate Japanese I. If grade of B or better is earned upon course completion, 8 additional retroactive credits are awarded for Japanese 110, 111. 

 

Japanese Language and Culture

4

3

Japanese 211 Intermediate Japanese I. Placement into Japanese 310 Intermediate Japanese II. If grade of B or better is earned upon course completion, 11 additional retroactive credits are awarded for Japanese 110, 111 & 210.

 

Japanese Language and Culture

5

6

Japanese 211 Intermediate Japanese I and Japanese 310 Intermediate Japanese II.

Foreign Languages

 

Spanish Language

 

 

3

 

 

3

 

 

Spanish 203 Intermediate Structure and Expression I. Placement into Spanish 204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II. If grade of B or better is earned upon course completion, 8 additional retroactive credits are awarded for Spanish 110 and111. 

 

Spanish Language

4

3

Spanish 204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II. Placement into Spanish-301 Advanced Composition and Conversation. If grade of B or better is earned upon course completion, 11 additional retroactive credits are awarded for Spanish 110, 111 and 203.

 

Spanish Language

5

6

Spanish 204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II and Spanish 301 Advanced Composition and conversation. Placement into Spanish 304 Advanced Composition and Conversation II. If grade of B or better is earned upon course completion, 11 additional retroactive credits are awarded for Spanish 110, 111 and 203.

Foreign Languages

Spanish Literature

3

3

Spanish 203 Intermediate Structure and Expression. Placement into Spanish 204 Intermediate Reading. If a grade of B or better is earned upon course completion, 10 additional retroactive credits are awarded for Spanish 110, 111 & 207.

 

Spanish Literature

4 or 5

6

Spanish 204 Intermediate Structure and Expression II and Spanish 301 Advanced Composition  and Conversation. If a grade of “B” or better is earned upon course completion, 11 additional retroactive credits are awarded for Spanish 110, 111 and 203.

Geography

Human Geography

3

3

Geog 001 Geography Elective

 

 

4 or 5

3

Geog 111 Human Geography

History

United States History

3, 4 or 5

6

History 201 US History to 1877 & History 202 Modern US History Since 1877

 

European History

3, 4 or 5

3

History 102 Modern Civilization

 

World History

3, 4 or 5

3

History Elective Degree Credit in Social Science

Latin

Latin Literature

3, 4 or 5

3

Foreign Language 001 General Elective credit

 

Latin Vergil

3, 4 or 5

3

Foreign Language 001 General Elective credit

Mathematics

Calculus AB

3, 4 or 5

4

Math 171 Calculus I

 

Calculus BC

3

4

Math 171 Calculus I

 

 

4 or 5

8

Math 171 Calculus I and Math 172 Calculus II

 

Statistics

3, 4 or 5

3

PBIS 189 – Problem Based Inquiry Seminar-Statistics

Music

Music Theory

3

3

Music Elective (Music Majors Only)

 

 

4 or 5

6

Music 107 Basic Musicianship 1 & Music 108 Basic Musicianship 2 (Music Majors Only)

 

 

3, 4 or 5

6

Music 102 and Music 219 - (Non-Music Majors)

Physics

Physics 1

3

4

Phys/Ast 007 General Elective degree credit in Lab Science

 

Physics 1

4 or 5

5

Phys/Ast 107 General Physics

 

Physics 2

3

4

Phys/Ast 007 General Elective degree credit in Lab Science

 

Physics 2

4 or 5

5

Phys/Ast 108 General Physics

Political Science

US Gov/Politics

3

3

Pol Sci Elective Degree Credit in Social Science

 

 

4 or 5

3

Pol Sci 105 American Government & Politics

 

Gov/Pol Comparative

3

3

Pol Sci Elective Degree Credit in Social Science

 

 

4 or 5

3

Pol Sci 101 Intro to Government

Psychology

Psychology

3, 4 or 5

3

Psych 101 General Psychology

Science

Environmental Science

3

3

Biology 001 Elective credit in Biology

 

 

4 or 5

4

Biology 104 Ecosphere in Crisis

Seminar

AP Seminar

3, 4 or 5

3

General Elective 001


For additional information about your high school's participation in the Advanced Placement program, see your academic adviser or visit your high school Guidance Office.

International Baccalaureate
Score Level Required for Credit at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Course and Level Score
Units (crs.)
Credit Granted As
Biology - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
4
Biology 105 Biological Concepts - Unity
Business and Organization - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
3
Business Elective 001 (Lower Level)
Chemistry - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
10
Chemistry 105 Gen Chemistry and 32-106 Gen Chemistry w/Qualitative Analysis
Computer Science A HL 4, 5, 6, 7
3
Computer Science 001 Elective Degree Credit in Computer Science
Micro Economics - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
6

Econ 206 Principles of Economics 1 and 207 Principles of Economics II

English - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
3
Eng 101 College English I
French - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
6
Any literature course above the 300 level
German - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
6

Any literature course above the 300 level

Spanish - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
6
Any literature course above the 300 level
History - HL 4
3
History Elective
History - HL 5, 6 or 7
6
History Elective
Mathematics - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
4
Mathematics 171 Calculus I
Philosophy - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
6
Phil 101 Elementary Logic and 109 Introduction to Philosophy
Physics - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
10
Physics 109 General Physics and 110 General Physics
Psychology - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
3
Psychology 101 Elementary Logic
Social Anthropology - HL 4, 5, 6, 7
3
Social Anthropology 232 Cultural Anthropology

For additional information about your high school’s participation in the International Baccalaureate program, see your academic adviser or visit your high school Guidance Office or contact the Assistant Director of Admissions-Transfer Director for an updated and accurate list of UW Oshkosh credit by examination information.

Contact: Assistant Director of Admissions-Transfer Director - Dempsey 135J
Phone: (920) 424-0202 or (920) 424-0404

University Books & More

University Books & More, located in Reeve Memorial Union, is your student's source for new and used textbooks. Select titles are available for rent.  An online textbook reservation program is an option for all semesters. Students can bill their textbooks and school supplies to their student accounts year round.  At University Books & More, students can find a variety of school and art supplies, greeting cards, authentic UW Oshkosh apparel and gifts, as well as many Fair Trade items. A variety of general reading books are also available. Weekly bestsellers are always 30 percent off, and the bookstore will special order any book not in stock at no additional charge.

Contact: University Books & More
Phone: (920) 424-0277
Fax: (920) 424-1082
Visit us online at: www.uwosh.edu/bookstore

The Corner Convenience Store

The Corner Convenience Store, located in Reeve Memorial Union, is your student’s quickest and closest place to get groceries, refrigerated food and drinks, frozen foods, health and beauty products, cleaning and household items, magazines, ready-made sandwiches, organic and Fair Trade products.

Contact: Corner Convenience Store
Phone: (920) 424-2343
Fax: (920) 424-1082 

Veterans' Services

Active duty veterans, guard members, reservists and dependents of veterans may be eligible to receive benefits from the Federal Veterans Administration and/or the Wisconsin Department of Veteran Affairs.

Information on Federal benefits can be found on the Department of Veterans Affairs web site at: http://www.va.gov. Information on State benefits can be found on the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs web site at: http://dva.state.wi.us/ or by writing directly to the Wisconsin Department of Veteran Affairs, P.O. Box 7843, Madison, WI 53707-7843.

On campus, eligible students may contact the Veterans Certifying Official to submit an application for federal and/or state benefits, to file change of place of training forms and to discuss matters related to their benefits.

Contact: Veterans Certifying Official - Dempsey Hall 130 
Phone: (920) 424-1804
E-Mail: va@uwosh.edu
Visit us online at: www.uwosh.edu/veterans

Women's Advocacy Council

Our goal is to incite University of Wisconsin Oshkosh students, staff and faculty to become politically and socially active in creating gender equity and empowering women. In order to accomplish this goal, we work to: raise awareness of impediments to gender equity, collaborate with other UWO organizations to promote attitudes and policies that empower women and provide an atmosphere where individuals seeking gender equity and women's empowerment can interact, discuss current events, and plan social and political activism. In order to accomplish these objectives, we attend community, regional and national activist events; we organize informational, social and activist events on the UWO campus; and we work toward educating the campus community, through the distribution of information about current issues that relate to gender equity and women's empowerment. All students are encouraged to participate in the council. 

Contact: Susan Rensing

Phone: (920) 424-0397

 
Contact: Geneva Murray
Phone: (920) 424-0963

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS

Student Recreation 

At UW Oshkosh, your student will find a wide variety of recreational and wellness opportunities. First-rate facilities, intramural sports, sport clubs, outdoor recreation and many additional group and individual programs and activities provide something for everyone.

Facilities

The Student Recreation and Wellness Center (SRWC), which opened in 2007, has 104,000 square feet of state-of-the-art recreation space. The SRWC includes basketball & volleyball courts, a jogging/walking track, climbing wall, golf simulators, three strength training areas, 100+ pieces of cardio exercise equipment, three group exercise studios, a multipurpose gym and a lounge area with wireless Internet.  

Kolf Sports Center features seven basketball/volleyball courts and a 200-meter indoor track. Albee Hall features an additional two basketball/volleyball courts, four racquetball courts, and an aquatics facility with a nine-lane lap pool and an adjoining diving well. Campus facilities also include sand volleyball courts and tennis course.  East Hall Fields are the setting for outdoor intramural and sport club activities.

Programs and Activities

  • Aquatic activities include open lap swim, aqua fitness classes, intramural activities, kayak instruction and other special events.

  • Sport clubs provide students with an array of instruction and competitive programs. Current active clubs include bowling, dance, golf, ice hockey, karate, lacrosse, racquetball, rifle, rugby and volleyball.

  • Group exercise classes are held daily in the SRWC studios. Classes include cycling, yoga, high intensity interval, Pilates, Zumba, core training, muscle conditioning, and a variety of cardio classes. Virtual fitness classes are also available with a Fitness on Demand system.  Personal training and fitness assessments are also available at the SRWC.

  • Xpeditions outdoor recreation offers a number of trips, clinics and programs throughout the year, including camping, skiing, bike maintenance, kayak instruction and much more. Xpeditions also offers equipment and gear to rent (e.g. bikes, camping gear, ski & snowboard gear, rollerblades, kayaks, etc.), a campus bike shop, and an indoor climbing wall.

  • Intramural sports feature a great variety of recreational and competitive opportunities through team and individual sports and events, including soccer, basketball, volleyball, dodge ball, swimming, tennis, wrestling, ultimate Frisbee, racquetball, flag football, softball, floor hockey, and badminton.

Contact: Student Recreation
Address: 735 Pearl Ave
Phone: (920) 424-3047

Communication Studies

The Department of Communication Studies offers a range of programmatic participation opportunities to both majors and non-majors. Students are encouraged to become involved in the program of their choice. Students interested in forensics may call the Director of Forensics at (920) 424-7048; students interested in Communication Club may call (920) 424-3480; students interested in internships may call (920) 424-2181; students interested in study abroad may call (920) 424-4422.

Contact: Communication Studies Department Arts/Communication S123
Phone: (920) 424-4427

Honorary Societies

Several honorary societies have chapters on campus, which are open to students who meet academic and other requirements.

Alpha Kappa Delta, Gamma Chapter

International Sociology honor society. Eligibility: "B" average or better in sociology, "B" average or better overall, junior standing (minimum), completed at least 4 regular sociology courses at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Sociology major or have a serious interest in sociology.

Contact: Orlee Hauser
Phone: (920) 424-7182

 

Beta Gamma Sigma

Beta Gamma Sigma is the honor society for students enrolled in business programs accredited by AACSB International – The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Eligibility: top 10 percent of junior class, top 10 percent of senior class and top 20 percent of MBA class in College of Business.

Contact: Patti Wild, BGS Coordinator
Phone: (920) 424-3147

 

Kappa Delta Pi

An international honor society, Kappa Delta Pi is dedicated to scholarship and excellence in education. Open to undergraduate students who have junior standing with at least 12 credits completed in the PEP and a 3.0 GPA; Open to graduate students with at least 12 credits completed in the PEP with a 3.25 GPA.

Contact: College of Education and Human Services
Phone: (920) 424-0115

 

Kappa Tau Alpha

Kappa Tau Alpha recognizes outstanding scholarship in journalism and mass communication. Membership is by invitation only, based on scholastic achievement and commitment to the profession. Membership is restricted to the top 10 percent of junior and senior journalism majors.

Contact: Journalism Department
Phone: (920) 424-1042

 

Phi Alpha Theta

National Honor Society in History. The Kappa Eta chapter of Phi Alpha Theta was chartered at UW Oshkosh in 1965. The Kappa Eta chapter meets annually to induct new members. Phi Alpha Theta holds scholarly conferences at the national and regional levels, publishes the work of its members in its quarterly journal, The Historian and also gives awards and prizes for outstanding historical scholarship at all levels.  Qualifying history majors and minors are invited to join the Kappa Eta chapter each year. 

Contact: History Department
Phone: (920) 424-2456

 

Pi Sigma Alpha

Pi Chi Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha, the National Honor Society in Political Science. Membership by invitation to those Political Science majors with a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and 3.3 in Political Science. 

Contact: Jason Kalmbach
Phone: (920) 424-3229

 

Psi Chi

National Honor Society in Psychology. Activities include volunteer work, fundraising, research, and participation in local campus and community events.  Eligibility: minimum 3.4 GPA in psychology and 3.0 overall, minimum 9 units (crs.) of psychology (3 of which were earned at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh), and at least 45 units (crs.) earned overall.

Contact: Quin M. Chrobak
Phone: (920) 424-2307

 

Sigma Mu Psi 

Sigma Mu Psi recognizes top marketing major. Eligibility: marketing majors who rank in the top 10 percent on GPA.

Contact: Melissa Bublitz
Phone: (920) 424-1013

 

Sigma Theta Tau

Eta Pi Chapter - International Honor Society in Nursing, facilitating development of excellence, leadership and creativity in nursing. Open to faculty, students and community nurse leaders. Students need a minimum of a 3.0 GPA. 

Contact: College of Nursing Office - Nur/Ed 148

 

Sigma Iota Rho

Gamma Chapter, honor society in International Studies. Recognizes accomplishment and service of students in International Studies. Eligibility: junior standing, at least 21 units (crs.) completed in courses giving unit (cr.) toward the International Studies major, including at least two courses at the 300 or 400 level; completion of the BA foreign language requirement; 3.3 cumulative GPA; and 3.4 GPA in International Studies courses.

Contact: International Studies Program
Phone: (920) 424-1291

Music

The Music Department offers opportunities for any student interested in musical performance to participate in the Symphonic Band, University Wind Ensemble, University Choir, Chamber Choir, University Women's Chorus, University Opera Theatre, University Symphony, Jazz Ensembles, Jazz Choir, Percussion Ensemble and Handbell Choir.

While a large number of students in these groups are either majors or minors in music, any student who has ability and experience in music is encouraged to join the organization of his/her choice, subject to acceptance by the individual director of each organization. Units (crs.) may be earned toward graduation by membership in one of the groups. A total of four units (crs.) in musical organizations may be used toward completing graduation requirements for the general student.

Contact: Music Department - Arts/Communication N210
Phone: (920) 424-4224 

Reeve Memorial Union

Reeve Memorial Union is a hot spot on campus and the perfect setting for our student's busy lives. The open-concept building boasts 163,000 square feet of space for activities, meetings, conferences, movies, parties or concerts. Reeve Union houses Mi Taza coffeehouse, Marketplace food court, Titan Underground, Gail Floether Steinhilber Art Gallery, Corner Convenience Store, University Books and More, Titan Central information desk, UW Credit Union, Salon Shahnaz, RUB Theatre with stadium seating and 20 meeting rooms and numerous lounge and pre-function rooms.

Contact: Reeve Memorial Union
Reservations and Catering: (920) 424-2435 
Phone: (920) 424-2346

Special Events and Speakers

A number of cultural and educational events are made available to students each year through student and staff groups. They bring a galaxy of nationally known speakers, musical and entertainment performances including bands, poets, improv groups, cultural speakers and individual artists. Reeve Memorial Union offers a variety of room accommodations for your special event. Titan Underground is the perfect place for an informal birthday, graduation or football party. Contact Reservations at (920) 424-2435 for more information.

Through organizations, like the University Speaker Series and Reeve Union Board (RUB), students have an opportunity to contact a number of nationally known performers who visit the University each semester. The music department annually sponsors a Chamber Arts Series for four programs featuring outstanding professional solo and chamber music groups.

Contact: Reeve Memorial Union
Phone: (920) 424-2346

Student Government:The Oshkosh Student Association (OSA)

OSA is the constitutionally recognized voice of the student body in all general University polices by being an equal partner with faculty and administration in the governance of the campus. The legislative powers of OSA are vested in a bicameral legislature, with a Senate composed of 25 representatives elected by students in the various colleges and an assembly composed of representatives from recognized student organizations on campus. Executive Officers of OSA (President and Vice President) are elected by the student body in the spring, and are assisted by the Chief of Staff and presidential appointed Ambassadors.

OSA Student Legal Services provides students with the service of an attorney, who is available to advise on all legal matters including landlord-tenant problems. Legal Services has volunteer positions available assisting the Director and Attorney.

There are numerous opportunities to become involved in OSA as a student representative on one of the approximately 50 University Committees that oversee various aspects of the university. Membership is open to all interested students, and information on these committees is available in the OSA Office.  

Contact: OSA (Oshkosh Student Association) Reeve Memorial Union 105E
Phone: (920) 424-3202

Student Leadership & Involvement Center (SLIC)

With over 100 active student organizations on campus, there is something for everyone! The SLIC is home to the Oshkosh Student Association (OSA), Reeve Union Board and Reeve Advisory Council (RAC), Greek life, Student Allocations Committee, Multicultural Education Council (MEC) and a wide variety of other recognized student groups including service clubs, academic and honorary organizations, professional groups that represent various academic departments and majors, foreign language and cultural clubs, religious groups, student governing bodies, recreational clubs and many special interest groups.

Located in Reeve Union, it is designed to create a friendly, professional community for students and their organizations. It serves as an initial contact point for potential student leaders as well as the communication center for all student organizations. It provides office space, resources and leadership development training to student groups and their members. Our staff is dedicated to encouraging student development and enhancing the overall educational experience through involvement in leadership activities outside the classroom.

Contact: SLIC - Reeve Union 105 
Phone: (920) 424-0847
Web: slic@uwosh.edu  

Student Publications

The Advance-Titan, the student-run newspaper at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, was founded in 1893 as the Oshkosh Advance. It has been serving students, the university and the community under its current name for the past 20 years.

Each week during the academic year, 3,500 issues of the Advance-Titan are distributed on the campus and the surrounding city of Oshkosh. The publication also has an active website and social media presence. The Advance-Titan includes the latest campus news and events along with coverage of local, state and worldwide news.

As a member of the Associated Press Collegiate Press and Associate Press, the Advance-Titan was rated All-American for 35 semesters. Additionally, the Advance-Titan won national Pacemaker Awards in 1973, 1981, 1991, 2002 and 2005. More recently, the newspaper took 1st Place Best of Show in 2010 and 4th Place Best of Show in 2012 at the National College Media Conference. The Wisconsin Newspaper Association named the Advance-Titan the 1st Place General Excellence collegiate winner in 2011 and 2012.

All students, regardless of major or minor, are welcome to gain valuable experience including newspaper writing, editing, photography, advertising sales, circulation and online journalism.

Contact: The Advance-Titan - Reeve Memorial Union
Phone: (920) 424-3048

 

Wisconsin Review is the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh's nationally recognized literary arts magazine. Each year, since 1966, Wisconsin Review has published two issues of poetry, fiction and artwork. Every month the Wisconsin Review staff evaluates submissions by national and international writers, seeking work that defines the contemporary literary scene. In order to offer the gift of quality, cutting-edge literature, Wisconsin Review seeks students of any major to evaluate, edit, publicize, manage and produce the magazine.

Contact: Wisconsin Review - Polk 45 and 47 
Phone: (920) 424-2267

United Students in Residence Halls

The United Students in Residence Halls (USRH) is the overall residence hall governmental body. The purpose of USRH is to provide an opportunity and means of self-expression and self-government by the students living in the residence halls on the Oshkosh campus. It serves as a recommending body to the Department of Residence Life and other departments that can relate to and affect student life in residence halls. USRH is based on the philosophy that student input is necessary when determinations are made on policies that impact student conduct, social and academic programming and operational procedures. Each residence hall has USRH representatives that have been elected or appointed by individual hall governments. USRH also has an executive board composed of officers elected by the students for a one-year term.

Along with having the opportunity to be part of the legislative body, hall residents are encouraged to actively participate in one of the organization's many committees. Students may be part of the USRH Hall Funds Committee, Leadership Development Committee, Programs Committee, Constitution Committee, Food Committee and Safety and Security Committee and other task forces and ad hoc committees. For more information regarding specific committees, contact the USRH office.

As well as offering these opportunities for involvement, USRH sponsors two weekend leadership retreats each year, provides funding to individual halls for nonalcoholic programs. Residents are also given the chance to attend several state, regional and national residence hall association conferences each year.

Contact: United Students in Residence Halls - Scott Hall first floor
Phone: (920) 424-4334


RESIDENCE LIFE

Housing Policy

The Wisconsin Board of Regents housing policy states that all freshmen and sophomore students (students who have not earned 60 or more units (crs.) as of the first day of classes) who are not veterans, married or living with parent(s) or guardian, shall be required to live in a University-operated residency hall when such accommodations are available.

The UW Oshkosh Department of Residence Life also exempts those students who have prior to the first day of classes, reached 21 years of age or, earned at least 48 credits or, resided on campus for four semesters or, commute from their parent's permanent home address within 45 miles of UW Oshkosh (annual submission of commuter card is required until one of the above requirements is met).

All transfer students who do not fall into any of the four above categories will need to reside on campus or file an appeal.

Contact: Department of Residence Life - South Gruenhagen 263
Phone: (920) 424-3212

Residence Halls

Residence hall facilities are offered on a contract basis for the full academic year. The dining service contract is incorporated within the housing contract and is discussed below under University Dining.

The residence halls on the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh campus are an integral part of the University community. More than a convenient place to sleep, the residence hall provides an environment where an individual may grow intellectually, socially and culturally. Each residence hall community offers opportunities to become involved in self-government, hall programs and recreational opportunities. Intended benefits of residence hall life are that students will learn to assume responsibility for developing their individual lifestyles while also learning to get along with other people.

Each residence hall is staffed by a Residence Hall Director, who is assisted by a staff of Community Advisors. Residence hall councils, under the leadership of United Students in Residence Halls (USRH), work for the common goals of all residents. Students and staff work together to make the residence hall a desirable place in which to live.

When a student is admitted to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, they will receive a housing pamphlet with their admission letter. This will direct them to the online housing application. Any student who would like to reside on campus must complete the online housing application and pay a $150.00 housing deposit. The housing deposit is applied toward the spring term room fee. Residence Hall assignments are made without regard to race, color, religion, national origin or sexual orientation. 

All residence halls, except Donner, Horizon, North Scott, South Scott, South Gruenhagen, Taylor and Webster are closed for Thanksgiving break and spring recess.

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh campus includes nine residence halls that house more than 3,200 students. Types of living arrangements that are available include coed high-rise halls, coed low-rise buildings and a suite style hall.  The residence halls provide recreation, study, laundry and kitchen facilities, plus a variety of educational, social and recreational programs to make the hall a living and learning center.

Donner Hall - Opened in 1962, capacity 246, coed, is named for Dr. C. Barbara Donner, professor of history from 1926 and 1956. Donner hall is open during academic year breaks.

Evans Hall - Opened in the fall of 1965, capacity 244, coed, is named for Maysel Evans, faculty member at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh from 1929-1963. 

Fletcher Hall - The largest of the "low-rise" residence halls, capacity of 450, coed. Opened in 1964, it is named for Walter H. Fletcher, a professor at the University from 1918-1944. 

Horizon Village-Opened in 2013, capacity 340, coed, and is named to reflect the large amount of light that fills the building.  Horizon Village is open during academic year breaks.

North Scott Hall - Opened in 1967, it is a 10-story high-rise facility, capacity, 560, coed, named after Louise E. Scott, faculty member in the Department of Education from 1929-1962. North Scott hall is open during academic year breaks.

South Scott Hall - Opened in 1967, it is a 10-story high-rise facility, capacity, 500, coed, named after Louise E. Scott, faculty member in the Department of Education from 1929-1962. South Scott hall is open during academic year breaks.

Stewart Hall - Named for Mary Stewart, faculty member from 1926-1960, opened in 1965, capacity of 230, coed. 

Taylor Hall - Occupied in 1963, capacity 504, coed, named for Dr. Hilda Taylor, chairman of the English Department from 1928 to 1944. Taylor is open during the academic year breaks.

Webster Hall - Capacity 200, coed, erected in 1957, and named for Emily Webster, former teacher of mathematics. Webster Hall is open during academic year breaks.

Contact: Department of Residence Life - Gruenhagen Conference Center - Room 263
Phone: (920) 424-3212

University Dining Meal Plans

UW Oshkosh has a variety of dining venues available throughout campus with convenient hours of operation (Monday-Sunday options); from a coffeehouse to a made-to-order salad station and all you care to eat commons, there is definitely something available for everyone. All of our dining locations accept a variety of payment methods, from our flexible meal plans and Titan Dollars to cash and credit card.

Meal Plans

UW Oshkosh offers flexible meal plans for both our residential and commuter students.  Our meal plans are a perfect blend of meals and Titan Dollars, allowing students to have the flexibility with their eating options on campus; when, where and what they choose to eat.  Learn more about specific meal plan (residential and commuter) options, criteria and cost by visiting our website…dining.uwosh.edu.

  • Basic and Deluxe Meal Plans: Resident students with less than 30 credits must choose from the Basic or Deluxe Meal Plans.  The Basic Meal Plan includes 15 regular meals per week and the Deluxe Meal Plan includes 21 meals per week.  Both plans come with 15 Bonus Meals per semester that may be used for guest or self, anytime, at most campus dining locations.  All resident meal plans also include Titan Dollars to be used at any food location on campus.

  • Ultimate Meal Plans: Resident students with 30 or more credits or have lived in UW Oshkosh Residence Halls for two or more semesters may choose from the Ultimate Meal Plans.  Ultimate Meal Plans offer a semester block of meals that may be used for guest or self, anytime, at most campus dining locations, coupled with Titan Dollars.  The Exclusive Ultimate Meal Plan is available to on campus students with 48 credits or more before fall semester or Horizon Village residents.

  • Commuter Meal Plans: In addition to any of our meal plan options, commuter students may choose a Bronze Ultimate Meal Plan.

  • Additional blocks of 5 meals may be added to any any existing Ultimate Meal Plan.

For current information and pricing, please visit dining.uwosh.edu.
Contact: University Dining Office
Phone: (920) 424-2391

 

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Global Scholar Designation

Global Scholar Designation

The Global Scholar (GS) designation is a program of distinction available to students who wish to hone their global knowledge and competencies without adding additional credits to their college degrees. It is open to all students, regardless of major or College.

By design, the GS designation is largely self-directed in the choice of courses and responsibility to track progress toward achievement. Students nevertheless have to “declare” their pursuit of the GS designation, which they can do at any point in the course of their studies. (Likewise, students have to “drop” it through the UARC if they decide they do not wish to complete it.) Once completed, the achievement of the GS designation will be documented on the student’s official transcript.

Students may choose from two different models – A or B – for the Global Scholar (GS) designation. Both models build upon the 3 Global Citizenship (GC) credits required within the USP:

 

 Model A: 12 credits 

100-200 level (USP)

300-400 level

(distributional)

Applied Experiential Learning + Reflection

3 cr. GC

9 cr. GS

 

*No more than 6 GS cr. from a single department or program.

e-Portfolio reflection on an applied or experiential learning opportunity (STAR milestone.)  For example:

  • Clinical
  • Study Abroad
  • Student/Faculty Collab. Research
  • Independent Study
  • Service Learning Project
  • Community Engagement/Internship

 

Model B: 12 credits:

100-200 level (USP)

300-400 level

(distributional)

Applied Experiential Learning + Reflection

3 cr. GC 

 

6 cr. GS

*No more than 6 GC/GS cr. from a single department or program.

e-Portfolio reflection on an applied or experiential learning opportunity (STAR milestone.)  For example:

  • Clinical
  • Study Abroad
  • Student/Faculty Collab. Research
  • Independent Study
  • Service Learning Project

Community Engagement/Internship

3 cr. GC Foreign Language

 

 

 

Once the GS model has been declared, the student and his or her advisors may track progress toward completion of the GS designation on the STAR report. Students are required to complete an e-Portfolio reflection in conjunction with an applied or experiential learning opportunity (noted in column three above). 

 

 

IMPORTANT: Information on this web site is subject to change without notice. 
Questions, Comments...Please email .

 

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University Honors Program

University Honors Program

Laurence D. Carlin, Director

Program Office: Oviatt House
Program Telephone: (920) 424-1303
Web Site: www.uwosh.edu/honors/

It is the mission of the University Honors Program (UHP) to foster an environment that allows the University's most qualified and motivated students to fulfill their intellectual promise while developing a range of abilities and talents. To that end, the UHP not only creates and supports courses for Honors students that are small, discussion-based and rigorous, but also sponsors social, cultural and intellectual co-curricular activities. These courses and activities are designed to challenge the university's best students to be critical thinkers, problem solvers and community leaders.

The UHP places the student-faculty relationship at the center of its mission by promoting teaching excellence, directed and collaborative research and scholarship, and formal and informal mentoring. Through its mission, the UHP provides for the larger University community a model program dedicated to the ideals of a comprehensive education.

For information regarding UHP requirements, policies and benefits, and for details about our curriculum, course descriptions, and much more, please visit www.uwosh.edu/honors/.  


University Honors Core Courses:

Honors   175                                           3 (crs.)

Honors Seminar (SS)(XS)

An interdisciplinary seminar required of all students in the University Honors Program. The course is designed to demonstrate the interaction between different areas of study within the university. A particular theme (for example, ethics) is selected each term. The seminar develops how that theme is meaningful in various academic disciplines. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing in the UW Oshkosh  Honors Program.

 

Honors   271                                           1 (crs.)

Honors: Culture Connection I

The purpose of this course is to heighten student awareness of educational opportunities available at the university and in the community, to broaden the student's appreciation for varying forms of intellectual endeavor, to expand the student's awareness of the interdisciplinary nature of the human experience, and to increase the student's critical thinking skills.  The means to these ends are attending intellectually oriented cultural events and writing critical essays about those events.  Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors program  with prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175.

 

Honors   272                                           1 (crs.)

Honors Culture Connection II

The purpose of this course is to extend student engagement with an appreciation for a range of cultural events or exhibits with a possible focus determined by a student's major. The means to these ends are attending intellectually oriented cultural events and writing critical essays about those events. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors Program; prior enrollment in HNRS 175 and HNRS 271.

 

Honors   275                                           3 (crs.)

Honors: Culture Connection (HU)(ES)(XC)

This course is intended to assist students with 1) cultivating strategies for engaging deeply with cultural experiences and events, and 2) furthering their development as writers. To that end, students will read a selection of essays on cultural criticism as well as cultural critiques of theatrical performances, music recitals and concerts, art exhibits, etc. In addition, students will be expected to attend cultural events on campus or in the community and to write their own critiques of those events. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors Program; prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175.

 

Honors   375                                           3 (crs.)

Honors Junior Seminar

A topical seminar offered to University Honors Program Students. Each Junior Seminar will focus on a specific topic and topics will vary from year to year. The course emphasizes active engagement on the part of students and innovative teaching strategies on the part of faculty. Prerequisite: The student must be in good standing in the University Honors Program and must have completed at least 60 units (crs.).

 

Honors   446                                           1-3 (crs.)

H: Independent Study

As with other Independent Study courses, the following should appear in the Catalog (Bulletin): See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

 

Honors   475                                           3 (crs.)

Honors Senior Seminar

An interdisciplinary, topical seminar offered to University Honors program students to meet the senior capstone requirement for the Honors Program. The course focuses on a single topic (e.g., "race," "dementia," "terror") that is examined within a broad, interdisciplinary perspective. Students develop a final project in their major that intersects with the course topic. The course emphasizes active engagement and interdisciplinary studies. Prerequisites:  Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors Program; prior enrollment in HNRS 175 and senior standing.

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Faculty and Academic Staff

2015-17 Faculty/Academic Staff


Wayne E. Abler (2007)

Instructional Program Manager of Instructional Television Services/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Byron E. Adams (2003)

Associate Advisor of Academic Support of Inclusive Excellence/B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Susan M. Adams (2014)

Director of Continuing Education/M.S. University of Phoenix; B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Gregory A. Adler (1994)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. Boston University; B.S. Washington and Lee University

Laurie J. Ahrens (2009)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/M.A. Lakeland College; B.S. Northwestern University 

Emily Al Bulushi (2008)

Administrative Program Manager of Residence Life/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Victor A. Alatorre (2001)

Assistant Director of Residence Life/M.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Joshua R. Albers (2014)

Assistant Professor of Art/M.F.A. University of Illinois at Chicago; B.F.A. Missouri State University

Heike C. Alberts (2005)

Associate Professor of Geography/Ph.D. University of Minnesota; M.A. Free University of Berlin

James M. Alderson, Jr. (1997)

Artist and Lecturer of Theatre and Drama/M.F.A. Indiana University; B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Elizabeth D. Alderton (1999)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Aliosha Alexandrov (2007)

Associate Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.S. University of Memphis; B.S. Technical University of Sofia

Thomas G. Allen (1989)

Senior Lecturer of Foreign Languages/M.A. University of Chicago; B.A. Lawrence University

Michael C. Altekruse (1998)

Senior Psychologist of the Counseling Center/Ph.D., M.S. Indiana University; B.A. Eastern Illinois University

Donna M. Altepeter (2009)

Lecturer of Social Work/M.S.W., B.A. St. Louis University

Isabel Alvarez (1999)

Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D., M.A. University of Massachusetts; B.A. University of Oviedo

Sally N. Andersen (2013)

Clinical Nurse Specialist of the Student Health Center/M.S.N. Concordia University; B.S.N. University of Phoenix

Erin M. Anderson (2011)

Senior Advisor of Academic Advising/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Lynn E. Anderson (2013)

Assistant Coach of Athletics/M.S. Valparaiso University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Merlaine A. Angwall (1998)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Theatre and Drama/M.F.A. Trinity University; B.A. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

John Ben Arbaugh (1994)

Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.A. The Ohio State University; M.B.A. Wright State University; B.B.A. Marshall University

Dawn M. Arnold (2004)

Student Services Program Manager of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/M.A. University of Nebraska; B.S. University of Wisconsin Platteville

Benjamin M. Artz (2012)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.S. Wisconsin Lutheran College

Efrain Ayala (2013)

Coach of Athletics/B.S. Minnesota State University, Mankato

Bruce W. Atwell (1998)

Professor of Music/D.M.A. University of Cincinnati; M.M. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.M. California State University-Northridge

Jaehan Bae (2007)

Associate Professor of Art/Ph.D. Florida State University; M.S., B.A. Daegu National University of Education

Ju Youn Bae (2009)

Lecturer of Mathematics/M.S., B.S. Kyungpook National University

Klara F. Bahcall (1988)

Professor of Music/M.A. Bela Bartok Conservatory; B.A. F. Leiszt Academy of Music

Laura J. Baker (2006)

Associate Professor of English/M.F.A. University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Michael C. Baltutis (2009)

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and Anthropology/Ph.D. University of Iowa; B.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Elizabeth J. Bannenberg (2014)

Information Processing Consultant of Learning Technologies/B.F.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Joann Bares (2006)

Student Services Program Manager of Residence Life/M.S. University of Wisconsin Platteville; B.S. University of Wisconsin River Falls

Richard B. Bares (1984)

Associate Director of Student Recreation and Wellness Center/M.A. Bowling Green State University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

David L. Barnhill (2003)

Professor of English and Environmental Studies/ Ph.D., M.A., B.A. Stanford University

Eric W. Barnum (2013)

Assistant Professor of Music/M.M. Minnesota State University, Mankato; B.A. Bemidji State University

Franca R. Barricelli (1995)

Associate Dean of Letters and Science; Professor of History/Ph.D., M.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. Scripps College

Elizabeth S. Barron (2013)

Assistant Professor of Geography and Urban Planning/Ph.D. Rutgers University; M.S. University of Massachusetts, Amherst; B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Jennifer A. Basler (2000)

Assistant Professor of Nursing/B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Gregory K. Batten (2007)

Student Services Program Manager of Student Recreation and Wellness Center/M.A. University of St. Thomas; B.A. Colorado Christian University

John E. Beam (2002)

Associate Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D., M.S. University of Miami; B.A. University of Texas

Lacey R. Beaman (2012)

Developmental Skills Specialist of Project Success/B.A. Ripon College

Victoria Beck (2009)

Professor of Public Affairs/Ph.D., M.A., B.A. University of Cincinnati

Michael E. Beeth (2003)

Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.S.Ed. University of Wisconsin Platteville; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Jeffrey A. Behm (1990)

Associate Professor of Anthropology/Ph.D., M.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Kelly L. Beisenstein-Weiss (2002)

Student Services Program Manager of Student Recreation and Wellness Center/M.S. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. University of Notre Dame

Michael D. Beitz (2011)

Assistant Professor of Art/M.F.A. University of Buffalo; B.F.A. Alfred University

Nicole L. Bell-Corelli (2005)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of Reeve Memorial Union/M.E. University of Toledo; B.S. University of Wisconsin Platteville

Jason K. Belnap (2009)

Assistant Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D., M.B.A University of Arizona; B.S. Utah State University

Stephen P. Bentivenga (1996)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. Kansas State University; M.S. Illinois State University; B.A. Illinois Wesleyan University

Zoubir Benzaid (1994)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D., M.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; M.S., B.S. University of Central Florida

Marshelle M. Bergstrom (1984)

Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing/M.S. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S.N. Montana State University

Scott B. Beyer (2005)

Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Missouri; M.B.A, M.A. Western Illinois University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Scott W. Beyer (2013)

Coach of Athletics/B.S. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

Christopher M. Bianchetti (2014)

Assistant Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S. Louisiana State University and A&M College

Daniel R. Bickett (2014)

Coach of Athletics/M.S., B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Whitewater

Kimberly L. Biedermann (2013)

Outreach Program Manager of Business Success Center/M.S. Vermont Law School; B.S. University of Wisconsin Green Bay

Elisabeth L. Billings (1990)

Student Services Program Manager and Counselor of Financial Aid/M.S.E., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Craig J. Biwer (2005)

Lecturer and Student Services Coordinator of Kinesiology/M.S. Northern Michigan University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Jeremiah J. Bohr (2015)

Assistant Professor of Sociology/Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; B.A. University of Wisconsin Green Bay

Andrew D. Borodin (2014)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Memphis; M.B.A., B.S. Western Kentucky University

Mark W. Bowen (2011)

Assistant Professor of Geography/Ph.D. University of Kansas; M.S., B.S. Missouri State University

Mindie M. Boynton (2013)

Outreach Program Manager of Business Success Center/B.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Sarah T. Bradway (2012)

Instructional Program Manager of Information Technology/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Christy A. Brazee (2009)

Assistant Professor of Communication/Ph.D. Purdue University; M.A. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point; B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Peggy A. Breister (2015)

University Relations Specialist of Integrated Marketing and Communications/B.A. University of Minnesota-Minneapolis

Amanda R. Briggs (2010)

Residence Hall Manager of Residence Life/M.S., B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Bradley A. Brooks (2015)

Instrumentation Specialist of Physics and Astronomy/B.S. University of Wisconsin Platteville

Pete J. Brown (1997)

Associate Dean of Letters and Science; Professor of Religious Studies and Anthropology/Ph.D. University of California Irvine; M.A., B.A. Idaho State University

Steven J. Brown (2007)

Senior Student Services Coordinator of Student Recreation and Wellness Center/M.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.A. Brown University

Cynthia L. Brun (2006)

Senior Student Services Coordinator of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/M.S. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S. Creighton University

David G. Bruno (2008)

Assistant Professor of Social Work/Ph.D., M.A., M.S.W., B.S. Wayne State University

Eric S. Brunsell (2008)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ed.D. Montana State University; M.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Catherine M. Bryan (1998)

Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D., M.A. University of Minnesota; B.A. Hamline University

Melissa G. Bublitz (2002)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; M.B.A., B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Grady D. Bullington (2001)

Associate Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. University of Tennessee; M.S., B.A. Western Kentucky University

Melissa R. Burgess (2013)

Assistant Director of Reeve Memorial Union/Ph.D. University of North Dakota; M.S. Kansas State University; B.S. Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville

Irma M. Burgos (1989)

Director of Center for Academic Support and Diversity/B.S. Mercy College

Nancy J. Burnett (1994)

Professor of Economics/Ph.D., M.A. University of California; B.A. Pomona College

John R. Burr (1964)

Professor of Philosophy/Ph.D., M.A. Columbia University; B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Crystal L. Buss (2012)

Associate Academic Librarian of Polk Library/M.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Jessica Calderwood (2008)

Associate Professor of Art/M.F.A. Arizona State University; B.F.A. Cleveland Institute of Art

Kimberly J. Calvert (2008)

Lecturer of Kinesiology/M.S. Indiana University; B.S. Northern Arizona University

Laurence D. Carlin (2000)

Professor of Philosophy/Ph.D. Rice University; M.A. University of Houston-Downtown; B.A. Franklin and Marshall College

Sylvia Carey-Butler (2013)

Assistant Vice Chancellor of Academic Support of Inclusive Excellence/Ph.D. Vanderbilt University; M.A. SUNY at Binghamton; B.S. SUNY College at Oneonta

Robert W. Carroll (2014)

Student Services Coordinator of the Counseling Center/ M.S.E., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Katherine E. Carstens (2006)

Student Services Coordinator of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Alison B. Casady (2013)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of Financial Aid/E.D.M. Iowa State University of Science and Technology; B.S. Carroll College

Jamie S. Ceman (2008)

Assistant Vice Chancellor of Integrated Marketing and Communications/B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Patrick V. Cerroni (2000)

Coach of Athletics/B.S. Carroll College

Tammy M. Chapin (2005)

Lecturer of Nursing/M.S.N., B.S.N. Marian College

Dylan Chmura-Moore (2009)

Assistant Professor of Music/D.M.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.M. New England Conservatory of Music; B.M. Baldwin Wallace College

Sarah M. Christensen (2011)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of International Education/M.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Jennifer D. Christus (2010)

Assistant Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D., B.S. University of Iowa

Quin M. Chrobak (2010)

Assistant Professor of Psychology/Ph.D. Kent State University; M.A. American University

Kelsey K. Churchill (2011)

Student Services Specialist of the Children’s Center/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Julia J. Chybowski (2008)

Associate Professor of Music/Ph.D., M.A., B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Denise M. Clark (2000)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Florida; M.S.E. SUNY College at Buffalo; B.S. State University of New York

Mehgan M. Clark (2007)

Assistant Director of Academic Advising/M.S. Western Illinois University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Mark A. Clements (2011)

Director of Administrative Computing and Networking/B.S. University of Wisconsin Platteville

Edward J. Clemons (2006)

Student Services Coordinator of Mathematics/M.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. University of Wisconsin Platteville

Rebecca L. Cleveland (1979)

Senior Lecturer of Nursing/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Craig E. Clifford (2013)

Assistant Professor of Art/M.F.A. Louisiana State University; B.F.A. California State University, Long Beach

Stewart J. Cole (2013)

Assistant Professor of English/Ph.D. University of Toronto; M.A. University of New Brunswick; B.A. University of Victoria

Christopher C. Connacher (2013)

Associate Psychologist of the Counseling Center/Ph.D. State University of New York at Albany; B.S. Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania

Jennifer R. Considine (2008)

Associate Professor of Communication/Ph.D. Texas A&M University; M.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.A. Marquette University

Sheldon J. Cooper (2001)

Department Co-Chairperson; Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. Utah State University; M.A. University of South Dakota; B.S. Northern State College

Erin M. Coppernoll (2004)

Coach; Student Services Coordinator of Athletics/M.A. North Park College; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Kathleen E. Corley (1992)

Professor of Religious Studies/Ph.D., M.A. Claremont Graduate School; B.A. Westmont College

Rocio Cortes (2003)

Associate Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D., M.A., B.A. University Wisconsin Madison

Chad D. Cotti (2008)

Associate Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; M.P.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Mamadou Coulibaly (2003)

Associate Professor of Geography/Ph.D., M.S. Southern Illinois University

Michael R. Cowling (1994)

Professor of Journalism/M.S. University of Illinois; B.A. Eastern Illinois University

Sandra K. Cox (2014)

Director of the Counseling Center/M.S., B.A. Eastern Illinois University

Susan R. Cramer (1990)

Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. The Ohio State University; M.Ed., B.S. Keene State College

Kevin D. Crawford (2007)

Associate Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D. Georgia Institute of Technology; B.A. Illinois Wesleyan University

Norlisha F. Crawford (2005)

Associate Professor of English/Ph.D., M.A. University of Maryland, Antioch College

Joann N. Cross (1980)

Department Co-Chairperson; Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Illinois; B.S., University of Wisconsin Madison

John A. Cross (1979)

Professor of Geography/Ph.D. University of Illinois; M.S., B.S. University of Florida

Melanie L. Cross (2010)

Administrative Program Manager of Admissions/B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Karina E. Cutler-Lake (2004)

Associate Professor of Art/M.F.A., M.A. University of Iowa; B.A. University of Minnesota

Kristi M. Cutts (2015)

Advisor of Business/M.S. University of Wisconsin Green Bay; B.S. University of Phoenix

Lisa M. Danielson (1992)

Registrar/M.B.A. St. Ambrose University; B.A. St. Norbert College

Randall S. Davidson (2008)

Outreach Program Manager and Lecturer of Communication/M.B.A., B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Richard M. Dcamp (1996)

Senior Administrative Program Specialist of Foreign Languages/Ph.D., M.A. University of Iowa; B.A. St. Ambrose University

Sarah E. De Armond (2007)

Associate Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.A. Colorado State University; B.A. Central Michigan University

Julie L. Decker (2013)

Counselor of the Counseling Center/M.S. Marquette University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Stephanie May Demontigny (2003)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Anthropology and Religious Studies/Ph.D., M.A. University of Iowa; B.A. Duke University

John R. Depies (2008)

Lecturer of Business/M.B.A., B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Ashay B. Desai (1998)

Associate Professor of Business/Ph.D. Memphis State University; M.B.A. University of Wyoming; B.Comm. University of Pune

Lori M. Develice-Collins (2002)

Assistant Director of Residence Life/M.A. Ball State University; B.S.Ed. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Julie Dey (2009)

Administrative Specialist of the Children’s Center/B.S. University of Wisconsin Stout

Marcel L. Dijkstra (2015)

Instructor of Physics and Astronomy/M.S. Michigan Technological University

David W. Dilkes (2003)

Associate Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D., M.Sc., B.S. University of Toronto

Donald W. Dingledine (2000)

Associate Professor of English/Ph.D., M.A. Temple University; B.A. Virginia Commonwealth University

Anthony J. Dirth (2010)

Student Services Program Manager of Student Recreation and Wellness Center/ M.S. Western Illinois University; B.A. St. Leo University

Kim J. Donat (2013)

Director of Financial Aid/M.S. Iowa State University of Science and Technology; B.A. Northwestern College

Kathleen M. Donnelly (1995)

Assistant Professor of Theatre and Drama/M.F.A. Northwestern University; B.A. State University of New York-Oneonta

Lisa A. Dorn (2003)

Associate Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. University of Montana; M.S. University of Illinois; B.S. Loyola University

Benjamin P. Dorsey (2007)

Coach of Athletics; Associate Student Services Coordinator of Student Recreation and Wellness Center/B.S. University of Wisconsin La Crosse

Steven C. Dunn (1999)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Business/Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University; M.B.A. Boise State University; B.S. California State University-Long Beach

Nicholas C. Dvoracek (1985)

Director of Media Services/M.S. University of Wisconsin Stout; B.S. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

Andrzej B. Dziedzic (1997)

Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D. Northwestern University; M.A. Marquette University; B.A. Warsaw University

Lane R. Earns (1987)

Provost and Vice Chancellor; Professor of History/Ph.D., M.A. University of Hawaii; B.A. Michigan State University

Christopher T. Edwards (1991)

Associate Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D., M.S., B.S. Montana State University

Jodi R. Eichler-Levine (2007)

Associate Professor of Religious Studies/Ph.D. Barnard College; M.A. Columbia; B.A. Brandeis University

Michael A. Eierman (1991)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Minnesota; M.S., B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Shawn C. Ekstrom (2013)

Senior Physician of the Student Health Center/M.D. University of Washington; B.S. Montana State University

Kathleen M. Elertson (2014)

Assistant Professor of Nursing/D.N.P., M.S.N. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S. Concordia University

Jill M. Endries (1982)

Director of Admissions/M.S., B.A. University of Wisconsin Whitewater

Jean I. Erdman (1984)

Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Linda L. Eroh (2000)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D., M.S., B.S. Western Michigan University

Dale M. Feinauer (1983)

Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.S., B.S. The Ohio State University

James W. Feldman (2004)

Associate Professor of History and Environmental Studies/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.A. Utah State University; B.A. Amherst College

Robert L. Feldman (1987)

Associate Professor of English/Ph.D., M.A. University of Maryland; B.A. Fairleigh Dickinson University

Vincent F. Filak (2008)

Associate Professor of Journalism/Ph.D. University of Missouri-Columbia; M.A., B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Anna A. Filipova (2009)

Associate Professor of Public Administration/Ph.D. Western Michigan University; M.A. Saginaw Valley State University

Susan L. Finkel (2000)

Lecturer of Education and Human Services/M.A. St. Mary’s University of Minnesota; B.A. Concordia University

Marisa L. Finkey (2000)

Academic Librarian of Polk Library/M.L.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Bradley T. Fischer (2012)

Coach of Athletics/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin La Crosse

Thomas A. Fischer (1996)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.S.E. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.A. Macalester College

Michael A. Flanagan (1996)

Student Services Coordinator of Minority Programs/M.S. University of Wisconsin Green Bay; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Phillip V. Florek (2009)

Associate Outreach Specialist of Business/B.S. Urbana University

Elizabeth S. Focella (2015)

Assistant Professor of Psychology/Ph.D., M.A. University of Arizona; B.S. University of Alaska Fairbanks

Thomas J. Fojtik (1982)

Director of Residence Life/M.A., B.A. University of Chicago

Leah Folks (2014)

Counselor of the Counseling Center/ M.A. Marquette University; B.S. University of Iowa

Suzanne E. Fondrie (2003)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D., B.A. University Wisconsin Madison

Michael Fonkem (2010)

Assistant Professor of Education and Human Services/M.A. Antioch University

Michael P. Ford (1987)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Iowa; M.S.E. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. Augustana College

Michael R. Ford (2013)

Assistant Professor of Public Administration/M.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.A. Marquette University

James W. Frey (2008)

Associate Professor of History/Ph.D., M.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. University of California Berkeley

Mary K. Friess (2012)

Assistant Professor of Nursing/D.N.P. St. Louis University; M.S.N. Concordia University; B.S.N. Marquette University

Cynthia D. Fruhwirth (1999)

Assistant Director of Academic Advising/B.B.A. University Wisconsin Oshkosh

David L. Fuller (2014)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Iowa; B.S. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

David A. Furcy (2005)

Department Co-Chairperson; Associate Professor of Computer Science/Ph.D. Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S. University of Iowa

Jayanthi Ganapathy (1987)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. Purdue University; M.S. University of Michigan; M.S. University of Kerala; B.S. Annamalai University

Christine M. Gantner (1998)

Director of Alumni Affairs/B.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Joshua B. Garrison (2006)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/M.S. Indiana University; B.A. Evergreen State College

Paul A. Gedlinske (2001)

Associate Director of Admissions/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Karen M. Gibson (2008)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.A., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

R. Daniel Gier (1996)

Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D. University of Texas; M.A., B.A. University of Utah

Edna J. Giesler (2002)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Social Work/Ph.D., M.S.W. University of Washington; B.A. Pacific Lutheran University

Timothy R. Gleason (2000)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Journalism/Ph.D. Bowling Green State University; M.A. The Ohio State University; B.S. State University of New York

Julie A. Gniewek (2013)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of Reeve Memorial Union/M.S. Marian College; B.S. Springfield College

Michael R. Godfrey (2001)

Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Nebraska; M.S., B.S. Northern Illinois University

Mary T. Gohmann (1992)

Assistant Dean of Students/M.S. Indiana University; B.S. Wheeling Jesuit College

Peggy S. Goltz (2014)

Student Services Specialist of the Children’s Center/B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

David Gomez-Torres (1994)

Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D. University of Tennessee; M.A. University of Salamanca

Elena Gonzalez-Muntaner (2003)

Associate Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D., M.A. Florida Atlantic University

Duane P. Goupell (2008)

Director of Testing Center/M.A., B.S. Central Michigan University

Jennifer A. Graff (1997)

Director of International Education/B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Kenneth J. Grieb (1966)

Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies/Ph.D. Indiana University; M.A., B.A. SUNY College at Buffalo

Thomas R. Grogan (2006)

Special Counsel to the Chancellor/J.D., M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Gueorgui T. Gueorguiev (2001)

Professor of Computer Science/Ph.D., M.Sc. Technical University of Bulgaria

K.L.D. Gunawardena (1989)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. Michigan State University; M.S. University of Manchester; B.S. University of Peradeniya

Jonathan H. Gutow (1995)

Associate Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D. Stanford University; A.B. Princeton University

Jennifer A. Haese (2013)

Student Services Program Manager of Dean of Students/J.D. Thomas M. Cooley Law School; B.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Janet W. Hagen (1990)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Willis W. Hagen (1984)

Professor of Business/J.D. Drake University; M.B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Kathleen A. Hagens (2011)

Administrative Program Manager of Business/ M.B.A., B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

M. Ryan Haley (2003)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Economics/Ph.D., M.A. University of Iowa; B.A. College of St. Thomas

Benjamin W. Hallett (2014)

Assistant Professor of Geology/Ph.D. Rensselear Polytechnic Institute; M.S. University of Idaho; B.S. Bucknell University

Morris A. Hampton (1984)

Senior Advisor of Academic Advising/M.P.A., B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Yoshiro Hanai (2009)

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D., M.A., B.A. Japan

Yvonne A. Hansen (1994)

Outreach Program Manager of Grants and Faculty Development/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Ronald K. Hardy (2004)

Administrative Program Manager of Polk Library/M.A., B.A. University of Iowa

Amney J. Harper (2008)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. Auburn University; M.A., B.A. Ball State University

Debra Ann Harris (2009)

Advisor of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/M.S. Cardinal Stritch University; B.A. Humboldt State University

Natasha J. Harris (2014)

Student Services Specialist of the Children’s Center/B.S.E. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Joan E. Hart (2002)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.A., B.S. Miami University

Laura M. Hartman (2015)

Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies/Ph.D., M.A. University of Virginia; B.A. Indiana University

Orlee Hauser (2006)

Associate Professor of Sociology/Ph.D., M.A., B.A. McGill University

Victoria Haydock (1995)

Director of the Reading Study Center/M.S., B.S., B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Douglas S. Haynes (2008)

Associate Professor of English/M.F.A. Southern Illinois University-Carbondale; B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Donald R. Heath, Jr. (2014)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.S. University of North Carolina at Greensboro; B.S. Guilford College

Randall P. Hedge (1995)

Director of Reeve Union and University Dining/M.Ed. North Dakota State University; B.M.E. Morningside College

Jacquelynn R. Hehn (2014)

Residence Hall Manager of Residence Life/M.S.E. University of Wisconsin La Crosse; B.A. University of Wisconsin Green Bay

Carmen E. Heider (2000)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Communication/Ph.D. Penn State University; M.A. Texas A&M University; B.A. University of Nebraska

Karen L. Heikel (2010)

Assistant Vice Chancellor of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/E.D.D., M.B.A., M.A. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

R. Douglas Heil (1988)

Professor of Communication/M.F.A. Northwestern University; A.B. University of Illinois-Urbana

Shannon A. Heinritz (2014)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of Reeve Memorial Union/M.S.E. Northern Arizona University; B.A. University of Wisconsin Whitewater

Brandon C. Heise (2008)

Associate Information Manager of Reeve Memorial Union/B.M. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Marguerite H. Helmers (1992)

Professor of English/Ph.D., M.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.A. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

Julie K. Henderson (1993)

Professor of Journalism/Ph.D., M.S. North Dakota State University; B.A. Moorhead State College

Jennifer L. Hendryx (2015)

Instructional Program Manager of Learning Technologies/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Stout

Kathryn Henn-Reinke (2000)

Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; M.A. Cardinal Stritch College; B.A. Dominican College

Larry A. Herzberg (2003)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Philosophy/Ph.D., M.A. University of California; B.A. Reed College

Eric E. Hiatt (2000)

Professor of Geology/Ph.D. University of Colorado; B.S. Indiana University-Purdue

Jeanne G. Hiatt (2004)

Lecturer of Nursing/B.S.N. Indiana University-Purdue

Charles A. Hill (1993)

Director of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement; Professor of English/Ph.D. Carnegie-Mellon University; M.A., B.A. Salisbury State College

Julaine M. Hill (2014)

Student Services Specialist of the Children’s Center/B.S. University of Wisconsin La Crosse

Rebecca L. Hitchcock (2013)

Associate Student Services Specialist of the Children’s Center/B.S.E. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Roy C. Hoglund (1986)

Professor of Theatre/M.F.A. University of Washington; B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Monika Hohbein-Deegen (2003)

Associate Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D. University of Cincinnati; M.A. Friedrich-Schiller University

Beatrice Holton (1993)

Associate Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. University of Oregon; B.A. University of California

Donald F. Hones (1997)

Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. Michigan State University; M.A., University of Minnesota; M.A. Duke University; B.A. Hope College

Phan Y. Hong-Lishner (2007)

Associate Professor of Psychology/Ph.D., M.A. University of Kansas; B.S. University of Iowa

Margaret M. Hostetler (1999)

Associate Professor of English/Ph.D., M.A. University of Washington; B.A. Linfield College

Toni M. House (2008)

Assistant Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. Capella University; M.S.E. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.A. University of Wisconsin Green Bay

Audra E. Hoy (2015)

Outreach Program Manager of Business Success Center/B.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Jon W. Hudson (2015)

Assistant Professor of Social Work/Ph.D. University of Kansas; M.S.W., B.S.W. Saint Louis University

Cynthia L. Huebschen (1994)

Academic Librarian of Polk Library/M.A., B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Stephan P. Huffman (1990)

Professor of Business/Ph.D. Florida State University; M.B.A., B.B.A. Madison College

John A. Imobersteg (1999)

Faculty Assistant of Music

Jean D. Inda (2002)

Instructional Program Manager of Education and Human Services/M.S. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Jakob H. Iversen (2000)

Associate Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.S.E. Aalborg University

Nicole R. Jackson (2011)

Advisor of Admissions/B.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Edwin Jager (1999)

Associate Professor of Art/M.F.A., M.A. University of Iowa

Jayalakshmi Jambunathan (1987)

Professor of Nursing/Ph.D., University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; M.S.N., B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; M.A., B.S. University of Madras

Ramanathan Jambunathan (1967)

Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy/Ph.D., M.S. University of Minnesota; M.S. University of Madras

Michael P. Jasinski (2008)

Associate Professor of Political Science/Ph.D. University of Georgia; M.A. University of Kansas; B.S. Towson University

Lixin Jiang (2013)

Assistant Professor of Psychology/M.S. Sun Yat-Sen University; B.A. Anhui University

Marianne F. Johnson (2001)

Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.A. Michigan State University; B.A. University of Minnesota

Natalie K. Johnson (2003)

Senior University Relations Specialist of Integrated Marketing and Communications/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Scott D. Johnson (2003)

Associate Registrar/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Christopher R. Jones (2012)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of South Florida; M.B.A., B.B.A. University of Miami

Danielle S. Jones (2013)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of Reeve Memorial Union/M.S. Central Missouri State University; B.S. Michigan Technological University

David M. Jones (1981)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Public Affairs/Ph.D., M.Ph. University of Kansas; M.A. Duke University; B.A. Carlton College

Patrick Juckem (2012)

Coach of Athletics/B.A. Lawrence University

Juliana L. Kahrs (2015)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of the Student Health Center/M.S. Miami University; B.A. Denison University

Richard A. Kalinoski (1998)

Professor of Theatre and Drama/M.F.A. Carnegie-Mellon University; B.A. University of Wisconsin Whitewater

Toivo M. Kallas (1989)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. University of Oregon; B.A. Carlton College

Eli Kalman (2008)

Associate Professor of Music/D.M.A., M.M. University of Wisconsin Madison

Jason A. Kalmbach (2014)

Assistant Professor of Political Science/Ph.D. Michigan State University; M.P.A., B.S. Eastern Michigan University

Nadejda T. Kaltcheva (2001)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Physics and Astronomy/Ph.D., M.S. University of Sophia

Kathleen Kaltenbach (1992)

Director of the University Bookstore/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Raj Kamalapur (2011)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.S., M.E. Western Michigan University

Jason R. Kannenberg (2014)

Administrative Specialist of Administrative Services/B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Whitewater

Ana Maria Kapelusz-Poppi (2002)

Associate Professor of History/Ph.D. University of Illinois-Chicago; M.A. Universidad de Buenos Aires

Jeffrey Kaplan (2002)

Associate Professor of Religious Studies/Ph.D. University of Chicago; M.A. Tufts University; M.A., B.A. Colorado State University

Robert N. Karels (2013)

Associate Academic Librarian of Polk Library/M.L.S. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; B.S. Northern Illinois University

Lauren M. Karnitz (2007)

Coach of Athletics/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Aaron T. Karst (2012)

Assistant Professor of Psychology/Ph.D., M.A. University of Nevada at Reno; B.S. Minnesota State University, Mankato

Jordan K. Karsten (2014)

Assistant Professor of Anthropology/Ph.D., M.A. State University of New York at Albany; B.S. Grand Valley State University

Stephen H. Katz (2003)

Academic Librarian of Polk Library/M.L.S., B.A. University of Michigan

Syed Kazmi (2008)

Associate Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. University of Iowa; M.S. Western Illinois University; M.S.C., B.S.C. University of Punjab

Brant L. Kedrowski (2002)

Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D., B.S. University of Minnesota

Karen Kennedy (2012)

Student Services Coordinator of Financial Aid/M.B.A., B.B.A. University of Albuquerque

Stephen E. Kercher (2000)

Department Chairperson; Professor of History/Ph.D., M.A. Indiana University; B.S. University of Illinois

William J. Kerkhof (1990)

Director of Engineering of Radio-TV-Film/B.S. University of Wisconsin Platteville

Brian M. Kermath (2012)

Outreach Program Manager of Administrative Services/M.A., B.S. Michigan State University

Brandon A. Kesler (2014)

Residence Hall Manager of Residence Life/M.S. Central Missouri State University; B.S. University of Wisconsin River Falls

Nari Kim (2009)

Assistant Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. Indiana University; M.A., B.A. Republic of Korea

Karen N. King (2004)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Public Affairs/Ph.D. University of Louisville; M.S. Indiana University; B.S. Ohio State University

Keith M. Kintner (2003)

Outreach Specialist of Radio-TV-Film/B.A. California State University, Northridge

Sharon L. Kipetz (2011)

Assistant Vice Chancellor of Dean of Students/E.D.D., E.D.M. University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Alfred T. Kisubi (1992)

Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D., M.A. University of Missouri; B.A. Makerere University

Gregory T. Kleinheinz (1999)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. Michigan Technological University; B.S. Northern Michigan University

Paul J. Klemp (1988)

Professor of English/Ph.D., M.A. University of Toronto; B.A. State University of New York

Laura J. Knaapen (1988)

Director of Academic Computing/M.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

James E. Koch (1996)

Associate Professor of Psychology/Ph.D., M.S. St. Louis University; B.A. University of Delaware

John J. Koker (1991)

Dean of Letters and Science; Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; M.S. Purdue; B.A. St. Norbert College

Todd A. Kostman (2000)

Department Co-Chairperson; Associate Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D., M.S. Washington State University; B.A. University of Montana

Alexander Kovzik (2001)

Associate Professor of Business/Ph.D., B.A. Belarusian State University

Kelly J. Kramp (2012)

Senior Student Services Coordinator of Reeve Memorial Union/M.A. Lakeland College; B.A. University of Wisconsin Green Bay

Lori A. Kroeger (2012)

Assistant Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Cincinnati; M.S., B.S. Xavier University

Lori J. Kroening (1989)

Senior Development Specialist of Foundation/B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Erik A. Krohn (2010)

Assistant Professor of Computer Science/Ph.D. University of Iowa

James S. Krueger (2009)

Assistant Professor of Political Science/Ph.D., M.A. University of Iowa; M.A. Loyola University of Chicago; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Kaye E. Krueger (2015)

Outreach Program Manager of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/M.A. Lakeland College; B.S. Cardinal Stritch University

Meghann M. Krueger (2002)

Associate Director of Financial Aid/B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Nathan E. Krueger (2011)

Assistant Professor of Music/D.M.A. University of Arizona; M.M. University of New Mexico; B.M. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Laurell L. Kuehn (2011)

Student Services Coordinator of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/M.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Eric W. Kuennen (2005)

Associate Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. Michigan State University; B.S. University of Minnesota

Michelle M. Kuhl (2004)

Associate Professor of History/Ph.D., M.A. State University at Binghamton; B.A. North Carolina State University

Robert A. Kunkel (1999)

Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.A. University of Tennessee; M.B.A. Western Illinois University; B.S. University of Illinois

Courtney C. Kurtz (2010)

Assistant Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Sandra A. Kust (1974)

Director of the Children's Center/B.S. University of Wisconsin Stout

Danielle S. Kvam (2014)

Assistant Professor of Communication/Ph.D. University of New Mexico; M.A. New Mexico State University; B.A. Concordia College

Jean M. Kwaterski (2000)

Assistant to Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs/M.B.A., B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Alice I. Kyburg (1993)

Associate Professor of Philosophy/Ph.D. University of Rochester; M.A., B.A. University of Massachusetts

Miriam H. Lamb (2007)

Lecturer of Mathematics/Ph.D. University of Oregon; M.A. West Chester University; B.A. Pennsylvania State University

Judy C. Lambert (1985)

Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D., B.S. Ball State University; M.S. Georgia College

Christina M. Lambie (2004)

Administrative Program Specialist of Career Services/M.S.E., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Thomas G. Lammers (1999)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. The Ohio State University; M.A. University of Northern Iowa; B.S. Iowa State University

Rachelle J. Lancaster (2005)

Assistant Professor of Nursing/M.S.N. Marian College; B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

H. Jordan Landry (2000)

Associate Professor of English/Ph.D., M.A. University of Colorado; B.A. Mount Holyoke College

Richard L. Landvatter (1999)

Senior Media Specialist of Information Technology/B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Ellen M. Lang (2014)

Residence Hall Manager of Residence Life/ M.S. Central Missouri State University; B.S. University of Wisconsin River Falls

Brain M. Langolf (2010)

Laboratory Manager of Biology and Microbiology/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Alan H. Lareau (1997)

Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.A. Middlebury College; B.A. Bates College

Annette L. Larie (2010)

Instructional Program Manager of Education and Human Services/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Tera F. Larson (2014)

Marketing Specialist of Business/M.B.A. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire; B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Mark J. Lattery (1997)

Professor of Physics and Astronomy/Ph.D., M.Ed. University of Minnesota; B.A. Bethel College

Christie L. Launius (2008)

Associate Professor of Women’s Studies/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; M.A. University of Cincinnati; M.A., B.A. Illinois State University

Jeffrey T. Lavake (2007)

Senior Lecturer of Business/M.B.A. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

Andrew J. Leavitt (2014)

Chancellor; Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D. University of Utah; B.S. University of Arizona

Brian Ledwell (1998)

Instructional Program Manager of the IDEA Lab/M.F.A. University of Idaho; B.F.A. University of Toledo

Jae Kook Lee (2008)

Lecturer of Mathematics/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; M.S. Kyungpook National University; B.S. Inje University

Jason V. Lee (2014)

Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice/Ph.D. Washington State University; M.P.A. University of Idaho; B.F.A. New York University; B.A. University of Oregon

Shu-Yueh Lee (2009)

Assistant Professor of Journalism/M.S. St. Cloud University; M.A., B.A. Republic of China Taiwan

Birgit Leisen Pollack (2000)

Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.S. New Mexico State University; B.A. University of Trier

John S. Lemberger (1995)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.S., B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Joseph A. Lemire (2008)

Police Chief of University Police/B.A. University of St. Thomas

Sheri J. Lense (2013)

Assistant Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D. Emory University; M.S. University of California, Berkeley; B.S. Princeton University

Michael L. Lenza (2008)

Associate Professor of Public Affairs/Ph.D., M.A. University of Missouri-Columbia; B.S. Missouri State University-West Plains

Ann Oliver Lepore (2001)

Senior Development Skills Specialist of Academic Support/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Maccabee S. Levine (2010)

Administrative Program Manager of Library Services/B.A. Brandeis University

Matthew G. Lewis (2013)

Assistant Coach of Athletics/M.B.A. Bethel College; B.A. Cornell College

Leah A. Lidbury (2005)

Senior Lecturer of the Reading Study Center/M.A. University of Montana, B.A. Beloit College

Bryan S. Lilly (1998)

Professor of Business/Ph.D. Indiana University; M.B.A. Northwestern University; B.S. The Ohio State University

Charles V. Lindsey (2005)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. Ohio University; M.A. University of Maryland; B.G.S. University of Northern Arizona

Evan J. Lipschutz (1989)

Professor of Art/M.F.A., M.A., B.A. California State University; B.A. Pomona College

David A. Lishner (2005)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Psychology/Ph.D., M.A. University of Kansas; B.S. Washington State University

Kenneth L. Liske (2000)

Associate Professor of Music/Ph.D. Louisiana State University; M.M. Bowling Green State University; B.M. Heidelberg College

Karl E. Loewenstein (2003)

Associate Professor of History/Ph.D., M.A. Duke University; B.A. University of Chicago

Gabriel J. Loiacono (2009)

Assistant Professor of History/Ph.D. Brandeis University; B.A. University of California Berkeley

Colin J. Long (2005)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Geography/Ph.D., M.A., B.S. University of Oregon

Samantha Looker (2011)

Assistant Professor of English/Ph.D., M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; B.A. Arizona State University

Nadia Louar (2009)

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D. University of California Berkeley; M.A. Portland State University; B.A. France

Andrew W. Ludtke (2012)

Coach and Associate Administrative Program Specialist of Athletics/B.S. Lake Superior State University

Brent R. MacWilliams (2000)

Assistant Professor of Nursing/M.S.N., B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Pamela MacWilliams (2009)

Director of the Student Health Center/M.S.N., B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Miles B. Maguire (2000)

Professor of Journalism/M.B.A. University of Maryland; B.A. Loyola College

Roberta S. Maguire (1997)

Department Chairperson; Professor of English/Ph.D., B.A. University of Maryland; M.A. New York University

Stephen D. Makar (1994)

Department Co-Chairperson; Professor of Business/Ph.D. Kent State University; M.B.A., B.S. University of Akron

Leah Mann (2011)

Laboratory Manager of Biology and Microbiology/M.S., B.S. Michigan Technological University

Melanie S. Marine (1998)

Senior Lecturer of the Reading Study Center/M.P.A., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Suzanne K. Marnocha (1994)

Undergraduate Program Director; Professor of Nursing/M.S.N., B.S.N. University of Evansville

Crystal M. Marschall (2011)

Advisor of Academic Advising/M.S. Concordia University; B.A. Alverno College

Edward P. Martin (2007)

Associate Professor of Music/D.M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; M.M. University of Texas at Austin; B.M. University of Florida

Richard A. Masters (1998)

Professor of Art/M.F.A., M.A., B.A. University of Iowa

Sally M. Masters (2012)

Associate Director of Academic Advising/M.S.E. Baylor University; B.S. William Jewell College

Eric G. Matson (2011)

Assistant Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. Iowa State University of Science and Technology; B.A. St. John’s University

Deborah S. Matulle (2005)

Academic Planner of Administrative Services/B.L.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Barbara Susan Maxwell (2005)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Art/Ph.D., M.A. University of Virginia; B.A. Mary Washington College

John S. Mayrose (2013)

Assistant Professor of Music/Ph.D. Duke University; B.M. University of South Carolina

Erin McArthur (2012)

Associate Academic Librarian of Polk Library/M.L.I.S. San Jose City College; B.A. Santa Barbara City College

Ameerah N. McBride (2015)

Director of Equity and Affirmative Action/J.D. Ohio Northern University; M.S. University of Phoenix; B.A. Clark Atlanta University

Ava L. McCall (1989)

Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D., M.S. Indiana University; B.S. Taylor University

Kelsey J. McDaniels (2013)

Associate Advisor of International Education/B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Lee I. McCann (1966)

Professor of Psychology/Ph.D., M.S., B.S. Iowa State University

Colleen M. McDermott (1991)

Associate Dean of Letters and Science; Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. Kansas State University; D.V.M., M.S. Iowa State University; B.S. Cornell University

M. Kevin McGee (1982)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Economics/Ph.D., M.A. The Ohio State University; A.B. Ohio Dominican College

Stacey L. McGee (2014)

Student Services Specialist of the Children’s Center/ B.S.E. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Eamon S. McKenna (2012)

Coach of Athletics/M.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Paula L. McNiel (2008)

Assistant Professor of Nursing/D.N.P. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; M.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S.N. Marquette University

Kelly M. McNiff (2012)

Assistant Coach of Athletics/E.D.M. Marian College; B.S.E., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Mary E. McPhee (2009)

Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies/Ph.D., M.S. University of Michigan Ann Arbor; B.A. Scripps College

Kathleen M. McQuillan (2013)

Administrative Program Manager of Human Resources/M.P.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.A. The Ohio State University

Dana K. Merriman (1998)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D., B.A. University of California

Walter E. Messner (1981)

Senior Lecturer of Music/M.S.T., B.M.E. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Peter M. Meyerson (2000)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.S.Ed. University of Pennsylvania; B.A. Skidmore College

Michelle L. Michalski (2002)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. Washington University; M.S. University of Missouri; B.A. Augustana College

Ann M. Mickelson (2014)

Assistant Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of South Florida; M.S.E.D., B.S.E. University of Wisconsin Madison

Jennifer E. Mihalick (1993)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D. Stanford University; A.B. Princeton University

Sara A. Mikoulinskii (2002)

University Relations Specialist of Integrated Marketing and Communications/B.F.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Anne Milkovich (2014)

Assistant Vice Chancellor of Information Technology/M.B.A. University of Montana; B.A. Montana State University, Billings

Andrew J. Miller (2007)

Senior Lecturer of Business/M.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. Milwaukee School of Engineering

Edward V. Miller (2011)

Assistant Professor of Geography/Ph.D. University of Chicago; M.A. Eastern Michigan University; B.A. University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

Ivana A. Milosevic (2014)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Nebraska-Lincoln; M.B.A. Eastern Illinois University; B.B.A. University of Belgrade

Anca M. Miron (2007)

Associate Professor of Psychology/Ph.D., M.A. University of Kansas; M.A., B.A. University of Iasi

Robert F. Mitchell (2015)

Assistant Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D., M.S. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; B.S. Duke University

William N. Mode (1981)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Geology/Ph.D. University of Colorado; M.S. University of Wisconsin Madison; A.B. Augustana College

Hosien S. Moghadam (1983)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. University of California; M.S., B.S. Pahlavi University

Wytse Molenaar (2010)

Coach and Student Services Coordinator of Athletics/B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Cliff R. Moll (2009)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D. Florida State University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Jennifer K. Monroe (2009)

Marketing Specialist of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Shawn M. Monroe (2011)

Administrative Program Manager of the Registrar’s Office/M.P.A., B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Elizabeth H. Morrell (2014)

Student Services Program Manager of Residence Life/M.A. University of Denver; B.A. Ripon College

Saadat Moussavi (1986)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. University of California; M.S. West Coast University; B.S. Teachers University

Michelle Mouton (2000)

Associate Professor of History/Ph.D., M.A. University of Minnesota; B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Leigh Ann Mrotek-Gorzek (2005)

Department Co-Chairperson; Associate Professor of Kinesiology/Ph.D. University of Minnesota; M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Sabrina R. Mueller-Spitz (2009)

Assistant Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. University of Cincinnati; M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Kathleen V. Mueske (2009)

Associate Director of Counseling Center/M.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Maureen A. Muldoon (1998)

Professor of Geology/Ph.D., M.S. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. Washington University

Theodore W. Mulvey (2011)

Academic Librarian of Polk Library/M.L.S. Dominican University; B.M. DePaul University

Caryn E. Murphy (2008)

Associate Professor of Communication/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.A. University of North Texas; B.A. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Megan Geneva Murray (2012)

Director of the Women’s Center/Ph.D. The University of York; M.A. George Washington University; B.A. Texas Tech University

Kandasamy Muthuvel (1988)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D., M.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.S. University of Colombo

Florence C. Muwana (2011)

Assistant Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Illinois at Chicago; M.S., B.S. Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Thomas L. Naps (2001)

Department Co-Chairperson; Professor of Computer Science/Ph.D., M.S. University of Notre Dame; B.S. Marquette University

Ahmed O. Nasif (2014)

Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy/Ph.D. George Mason University; M.S.E. Wright State University; B.S.E. Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology

Kay E. Neal (1979)

Professor of Communication/Ph.D., M.A. Ohio University; B.S. Central Michigan University

Leslie Neal-Boylan (2015)

Dean; Professor of Nursing/Ph.D. George Mason University; M.S. San Jose State University; B.S.N. Rutgers University

Sarah L. Neises (1996)

Administrative Program Manager of Polk Library/M.L.S. University of Michigan; B.A. University of Northern Iowa

Francis Ngaboh-Smart (1995)

Associate Professor of English/Ph.D. University of Georgia; M.A., B.A. University of Sierra Leone

Bonnie L. Nickasch (2009)

Assistant Professor of Nursing/D.N.P., M.S.N., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Bruce D. Niendorf (1999)

Professor of Business/Ph.D. Florida State University; M.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Karl F. Nollenberger (2008)

Associate Professor of Public Administration/Ph.D. University of Illinois at Chicago; M.P.A. University of Colorado at Denver; B.B.A. University of Iowa

Marc K. Nylen (1993)

Director of Gruenhagen Conference Center/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Donna J. O'Brien (2006)

Development Program Manager of Foundation/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Sarah L. O’Connell (2005)

Lecturer of Nursing/M.S.N., B.S.N. Marquette University

Pawel Olszewski (2014)

Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy/Ph.D., M.S. Warsaw University of Technology

Devin T. Otto (2015)

Assistant Professor of Music/D.M.A. University of Colorado at Boulder; M.A. Eastern Washington University; B.M. University of Idaho

Jaime L. Page-Stadler (2004)

Director of Career Services/M.S. Western Illinois University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Whitewater

Anthony J. Palina (2001)

Instrumentation Specialist of Art/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Anthony J. Palmeri (1989)

Professor of Communication/Ph.D. Wayne State University; M.A. Central Michigan University; B.A. St. John's University

Gail D. Panske (1991)

Professor of Art/M.F.A. Indiana University; B.F.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Amy L. Parrott (2009)

Assistant Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D., M.S. University of Nebraska-Lincoln; B.A. Central University of Iowa

Jean B. Patt (2009)

Assistant Director of Academic Advising and Student Services Coordinator of Letters and Science/M.S. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

Thomas R. Patt (2007)

Director of Student Recreation and Wellness Center and Intramural Sports/M.A. Ohio State University; B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Timothy S. Paulsen (1999)

Professor of Geology/Ph.D. University of Illinois; B.S, University of Wisconsin Madison

James R. Paulson (1984)

Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D., B.A. Princeton University

Rebecca R. Payne (2002)

Administrative Program Specialist of Foundation/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Wade C. Peitersen (1999)

Athletic Trainer of Athletics/M.A. Western Michigan University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Marguerite W. Penick-Parks (2001)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Iowa; M.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. Iowa State University

David K. Penniston (2008)

Associate Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. University of Georgia; M.S. University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Linda H. Pereksta (2009)

Associate Professor of Music/Ph.D. Florida State University; M.M. Johns Hopkins University; B.M. University of Iowa

Troy A. Perkins (2003)

Associate Professor of Communication/M.F.A. New York University; B.F.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

James D. Pesta (2008)

Associate Professor of English/Ph.D. Purdue University; M.A., B.A. John Carroll University

Joseph E. Peterson (2010)

Assistant Professor of Geology/Ph.D., M.S. Northern Illinois University; B.S. Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Marybeth Petesch (1999)

Director of Field Experience of Education and Human Services/M.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Loucas Petronicolos (1996)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D., M.S. Indiana University; B.S. Aristotelian University

Elena A. Petrova (2008)

Psychologist of Counseling Center/Ph.D. Auburn University; M.A. Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville; B.A. Graceland University

George C. Philip (1981)

Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Iowa; M.S. South Dakota State University; B.S. University of Kerala

Robert W. Pillsbury (2001)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. Bowling State University; M.S. University of Minnesota; B.S. University of Minnesota-St. Paul

Matthew M. Piszczek (2014)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.S., B.S. Michigan State University

Ellen E. Pitsch (1994)

Lecturer of Nursing/M.S.N., B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Jacqueline L. Pluim (2000)

Senior Student Services Specialist of the Children’s Center/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Jessica J. Pondell (2007)

Student Services Coordinator of Business/M.A. University of Northern Iowa; B.S. University of Wisconsin La Crosse

Arthur J. Pontynen (1989)

Professor of Art/Ph.D., M.A. University of Iowa; B.A. Western Washington University

Dawn M. Pope (1997)

Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing/M.S. Syracuse University; B.S.N. University of Alaska-Anchorage

Gregory R. Potratz (2012)

Laboratory Manager of Chemistry/M.S. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Wendy K. Potratz (2006)

Senior Lecturer of Business/M.B.A., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Amanda W. Potts (2011)

Editor of Integrated Marketing and Communications/B.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Kenneth L. Price (1999)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D., M.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.S. Western Illinois University

Barton J. Pritzl (2007)

Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy/Ph.D., M.S. Michigan State University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Jane E. Purse-Wiedenhoeft (2008)

Associate Professor of Theatre/M.F.A. Purdue University; B.A. Gustavus Adolphus College

Walter J. Rainboth (1992)

Associate Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. University of Michigan; M.S., B.S. University of Illinois

Joshua P. Ranger (1998)

Senior Academic Librarian of Polk Library/M.L.S., B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Shelly L. Rankl (2011)

Residence Hall Manager of Residence Life/M.S. Missouri State University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Terry J. Rapp (2010)

Advisor of Business/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Arthur H. Rathjen (2006)

Vice Chancellor of Foundation/M.S.E. Eastern Illinois University; B.A. Alma College

Barbara L. Rau (1997)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Shannon L. Rawski (2015)

Instructor of Business/M.A. University of Nebraska-Lincoln; B.S. Bowling Green University

Rinardo L. Reddick (2012)

Student Services Program Manager of Dean of Students/Ph.D. Iowa State University of Science and Technology; M.A. Appalachian State University; B.A. East Carolina University

Andrew L. Redington (2000)

Associate Professor of Art/M.F.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S., B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Jayme L. Reichenberger (2013)

Instructional Program Manager of Project Success/B.E.D. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Mary G. Reinke (2011)

Student Services Coordinator of International Education/B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Renae D. Reljic (2007)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D., M.A., B.S. University of South Dakota

Peter A. Remender (1966)

Professor of Sociology/Ph.D. Michigan State University; M.A., B.S. Central Michigan University

Susan M. Rensing (2009)

Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies and History/Ph.D. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Jordan P. Rhodes (2014)

Administrative Program Manager of Business/B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Adam D. Rich (2010)

Residence Hall Manager of Residence Life/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Elizabeth R. Richards (1999)

Senior Advisor of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Stephen C. Richards (2004)

Professor of Public Affairs/Ph.D. Iowa State University; M.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Susan B. Ridgely (2006)

Associate Professor of Religious Studies/Ph.D., M.A. University of North Carolina; A.B. Princeton University

Joann L. Rife (2008)

Director of Planning and Construction/B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Ronald J. Rindo (1992)

Professor of English/Ph.D., M.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.A. Carroll College

Dennis F. Rioux (1995)

Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. St. Olaf College

Kimberly A. Rivers (1996)

Professor of History/Ph.D., M.A. University of Toronto; B.A. Earlham College

Robert W. Roberts (2013)

Director of Grants and Faculty Development/M.P.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; M.S. Capella University; B.A. University of Wisconsin Platteville

Marty J. Robinson (2004)

Associate Professor of Music/D.M.A. Florida State University; M.M. Eastman School of Music; B.M. Lawrence University

Denise A. Robson (1994)

Associate Professor of Economics/Ph.D., M.A. University of Nebraska; B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

Laura M. Rommelfanger (2011)

Administrative Program Manager of the Alumni Welcome and Conference Center/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Christopher D. Rose (2002)

Associate Professor of Public Affairs/Ph.D. Southern Illinois University-Carbondale; M.A. Western Kentucky University; B.A. Murray State University

Petra M. Roter (2005)

Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs/Ph.D. Indiana State University; M.S., B.S. Western Illinois University

Christine A. Roth (2001)

Associate Professor of English/Ph.D., B.A. University of Florida; M.A. University of Maryland

Douglas N. Roubidoux (1998)

Senior Lecturer of Communication/M.A. Wichita State University; B.A. University of Texas-San Antonio

Liza C. Ruetten (2013)

Coach of Athletics/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Julie A. Russo (2005)

Student Services Coordinator of University Honors Program/B.A. Virginia Commonwealth University

Michael A. Rutz (2002)

Professor of History/Ph.D., M.A. Washington University; B.A. University of Michigan

Kelli A. Saginak (2004)

Professor of Education and Human Services/E.D.D. Idaho State University; M.A. Rollins College; B.S. University of Central Florida

M. Alan Saginak (1998)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Education and Human Services/E.D.D. Idaho State University; M.A. Slippery Rock University; B.A. Dinboro State College

Guadalupe M. Salinas (2005)

Student Services Coordinator of Academic Support/B.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Emmet P. Sandberg (2004)

Assistant Professor of Art/M.F.A. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Patricia A. Scanlan (1995)

Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Iowa; M.S. St. Cloud State University; B.S. College of St. Theresa

Miriam H. Schacht (2007)

Assistant Professor of English/Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin; M.A. University of New Mexico; B.A. Wesleyan University

Brian R. Schaefer (1997)

Coach of Athletics/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Sarah E. Schafer (2015)

Instructor of Business/M.A., B.B.A. University of Toledo

Michael H. Schellenger (1989)

Professor of Business/D.B.A. University of Arkansas; M.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; B.A. University of Wisconsin La Crosse

Sabina B. Schiessl (2008)

Administrative Program Specialist of Foundation/B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Kelly A. Schill (2008)

Research Program Manager of Grants and Faculty Development/B.S. University of Wisconsin River Falls

Jim A. Schlinsog (2010)

Student Services Program Manager of Dean of Students/M.A. Eastern Michigan University

Michele Schlinsog (2011)

Advisor of Academic Advising/M.A., B.S. Eastern Michigan University

Bonnie J. Schmidt (2004)

Assistant Professor of Nursing/M.S.N. University of Phoenix; B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Karen S. Schmidt (2012)

Instructional Program Manager of Project Success/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

W. Daniel Schmidt (1997)

Department Co-Chairperson; Professor of Kinesiology/Ph.D., M.S. Purdue University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Catherine A. Schmitt (2014)

Assistant Professor of Nursing/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; M.S.N., B.S.N. Marian College

Jennifer M. Schubert (2007)

Student Services Coordinator of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Jamie L. Schwister (2010)

Administrative Specialist of Administrative Services/B.A. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

Thomas R. Scofield (2005)

Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. Southern Illinois University; M.S.Ed. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. University of Wisconsin Parkside

Druscilla L. Scribner (2005)

Associate Professor of Political Science/Ph.D., B.A. University of California; M.S. London School of Economics

Yuyun Sejati (2012)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.S. Oklahoma State University; B.S. Gadjah Mada University

Julie A. Shaffer (1996)

Professor of English/Ph.D., M.A. University of Washington; B.A. University of California

Alison A. Shaw (2008)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Music/D.M.A., M.M. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; B.M.E. University of Arizona

Teri Shors (1997)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. Arizona State University; M.S. Idaho State University; B.S. St. Cloud State University

Katherine J. Short-Meyerson (2011)

Senior Lecturer of Education and Human Services/Ph.D., M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Madison

Juergen Sidgman (2014)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Nebraska-Lincoln; M.B.A. University of Nebraska-Kearney; B.S. University Diego Portales; B.S. University Metro Ciencias de Education

David J. Siemers (2001)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Political Science/Ph.D., M.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. St. Olaf College

Sarinda T. Siemers (2008)

Associate Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.A. University of Illinois at Chicago; B.A. Thamma Sat University

James R. Simmons (1989)

Professor of Political Science/Ph.D., M.A., B.A. Indiana University

Mary M. Simon (2002)

Senior Administrative Program Specialist of the Chancellor’s Office/B.S. Silver Lake College-Holy Family

Gary L. Simonsen (1989)

Senior Advisor of Academic Advising/M.A. Winona State University; B.S. Milton College

Darryl L. Sims (2007)

Director of Athletics/M.A., B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Robert C. Sipes (2009)

Assistant Professor of Kinesiology/Ed.D. Illinois State University; M.S. California State University Long Beach; B.A. Judson College

Ryan L. Skiver (2013)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.B.A., B.B.A., B.A. University of Toledo

Stacey N. Skoning (2007)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D., M.S.E., B.S.E. University of Wisconsin Madison

Tracy H. Slagter (2006)

Associate Professor of Political Science/Ph.D., M.A. University of Iowa; B.A. University of Minnesota

Naomi L. Smith (2012)

Associate Administrative Specialist of Academic Support/B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Sarah E. Smith (2008)

Outreach Program Manager of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/M.A., B.A. Lakeland College

Terrence A. Smith (2011)

Advisor of Admissions/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Andrew D. Smock (2011)

Assistant Professor of Communication/Ph.D. Michigan State University; M.S., B.S. Eastern Michigan University

Laura L. Smolinski (2005)

Lecturer of Nursing/M.S.N. University of Phoenix; B.S.N. Carroll College

Juyeon Son (2007)

Assistant Professor of Sociology/Ph.D., M.S. University of Oregon; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Thomas G. Sonnleitner (2000)

Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services/B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Madison

Stephanie N. Spehar (2007)

Associate Professor of Anthropology/Ph.D., M.A. New York University; B.A. California State University Los Angeles

April J. Spivack (2012)

Assistant Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.A. University of North Carolina at Charlotte; B.S. University of Florida

Michelle L. Sponholz (2000)

Assistant Director of Residence Life/M.S. Indiana State University; B.S. University of Wisconsin River Falls

B. S. Sridhar (1987)

Associate Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.B.A. Ohio State University; M.A. Tata Institute of Social Science; B.S. Bangalore University

Marie F. Stapel (1994)

Student Services Coordinator of Admissions/B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Sara A. Steffes Hansen (2009)

Assistant Professor of Journalism/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.B.A. University of Colorado at Denver; B.A. University of Wisconsin Eau Claire

Robert S. Stelzer (2001)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D. University of Notre Dame; M.S. Michigan State University; B.S. Rockhurst University

Craig D. Stenbroten (2010)

Assistant Coach of Athletics/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Nathaniel G. Stepanek (2013)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of Admissions/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

James M. Stevens (2008)

Instructional Program Manager of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement/M.A. Clemson University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Laura L. Stevens (1991)

Student Services Program Manager of Admissions/M.S.W. Arizona State University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Justin W. Stigler (2011)

Associate Administrative Specialist of Admissions/B.E.D. Carroll College

Victoria L. Stimac (2011)

Assistant Director of Athletics/M.B.A. Western New Mexico University; B.A. Cardinal Stritch University

Nenad Stojilovic (2009)

Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy/Ph.D., M.S. University of Akron; B.S. University of Belgrade

Justine F. Stokes (2009)

Senior Lecturer of Radio-TV-Film/M.A. Miami University; B.A. Morningside College

A. Martin Strand (2003)

Assistant Director of Reeve Union/B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Christopher J. Stratton (2008)

Lecturer of Education and Human Services/M.S. University of Wisconsin La Crosse; B.S.E. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Wendy J. Strauch-Nelson (2004)

Associate Professor of Art/Ph.D., M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Shelley L. Strojny (2009)

Lecturer of Nursing/M.S.N. University of Phoenix; B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

John E. Strous (1991)

Director and Senior Scientist of Medical Technology/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Nathan V. Stuart (2009)

Associate Professor of Business/Ph.D. Indiana University; M.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology; B.S. Princeton University

Angela G. Subulwa (2008)

Associate Professor of Geography/Ph.D., M.A. University of Kansas; B.S. Northwest Missouri State University

Scott M. Summers (2013)

Assistant Professor of Computer Science/Ph.D., M.S. Iowa State University; B.S. University of Green Bay

Douglas A. Sundin (2011)

Media Specialist of Integrated Marketing and Communications/B.A. Winona State University

Susan L. Surendonk (2001)

Administrative Program Manager of Grants and Faculty Development/M.A. Marquette University; B.A. University of Wisconsin Whitewater

Thomas J. Suszek (2000)

Senior Instrumentation Specialist of Geology/M.S. University of Minnesota; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Matthew T. Suwalski (2004)

Assistant Director of Reeve Union/M.S., B.B.A. Western Illinois University; M.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Sara A. Suwalski (2006)

Assistant Director of Reeve Union/M.S. Western Illinois University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Green Bay

Abigail K. Sylvia (2012)

Assistant Director of Residence Life/M.S. South Dakota State University; B.A. Morningside College

Lisa M. Szromba (2006)

Assistant Director of Academic Advising/M.S.E. Loyola University; B.A. College of St. Benedict

Jennifer E. Szydlik (1995)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D., M.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. St. Cloud State University

Stephen D. Szydlik (1996)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D., M.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S. Union College

William J. Tallon (2010)

Dean; Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Iowa; M.B.A., B.S. Northern Illinois University

Yijun Tang (2009)

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Maryne Taute (2010)

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Laurie J. Textor (2015)

Assistant Vice Chancellor of Human Resources/M.P.A., B.B.A. Iowa State University

Craig Thomas (2012)

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George Thomas (2010)

Assistant Professor of Computer Science/Ph.D., M.S. University of Iowa; B.S. University of Kerala

Jerry D. Thomas (2011)

Assistant Professor of Political Science/Ph.D., M.A. University of Kentucky; J.D. Chicago-Kent College of Law; B.A. Coker College

Ashley E. Thompson (2015)

Instructor of Psychology/B.S. University of Wisconsin River Falls

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Julie A. Thyssen (2006)

Senior Media Specialist of Information Technology/B.A. Winona State University

Kennan L. Timm (1985)

Sports Information Director of Athletics/B.S. University of Wisconsin La Crosse

Michael J. Tippins (1999)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Nebraska; M.B.A. Indiana University; B.B.A. University of Georgia

Christine R. Tipps (1988)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Education and Human Services/ Ed.D., M.S. West Virginia University; B.S. University of Wisconsin La Crosse

Cathy A. Toll (2015)

Assistant Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University; M.S.E. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.A. St. Norbert College

Kevin D. Tomasiewicz (2013)

Coach of Athletics/M.B.A. Southwest State University; B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Whitewater

Paul M. Van Auken (2007)

Department Chairperson; Associate Professor of Sociology/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.A. University of Delaware; B.A. Wartburg College

Vicki L. Van Deurzen (1989)

Laboratory Manager of Biology and Microbiology/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Lee Van Scyoc (1987)

Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Nebraska; M.A., B.A. Washington State University

Carleen M. Vande Zande (2008)

Associate Vice Chancellor of Curricular Affairs and Student Academic Achievement/Ph.D., M.A. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.A. Daemen College

Patricia J. Vander Loop (1995)

Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing; M.S.N., B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Patrick F. Vander Zanden (2010)

Residence Hall Manager of Residence Life/M.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.S. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Chue Vang (2014)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of Financial Aid/M.S. Concordia University; B.A. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Lucas E. Venne (2006)

Assistant Coach of Athletics/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Angela K. Victor (2010)

Administrative Program Specialist of Career Services/M.A. Lakeland College; M.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.A. University of Wisconsin Green Bay

William F. Wacholtz (1989)

Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D. Tulane University of Louisiana; B.S. University of Washington

Elizabeth I. Wade-Sirabian (1997)

Department Chairperson; Professor of Foreign Languages/Ph.D., M.A. University of Illinois; A.B. Washington University

Robert Wagoner (2011)

Assistant Professor of Philosophy/Ph.D. University of Arizona; M.A., B.A. University of Kentucky

Leslie Wartgow (2013)

Associate Counselor of the Counseling Center/M.E. Kent State University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Lauren S. Waters (2012)

Assistant Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology; B.A. Cornell University

Michael P. Watkins (1991)

Academic Librarian of Polk Library/M.P.A., M.A., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Jennifer L. Watson (2014)

Associate Vice Chancellor of Faculty and Academic Staff Affairs/Ph.D., M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; B.A. Grinnell College

Michael W. Watson (1999)

Director of Institutional Research/M.A., B.A. University of Kansas

Mary R. Weeden (2015)

Instructor of Social Work/M.S.W., B.S.W. Aurora University

Theresa M. Wegner (2002)

Assistant Professor of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Cameron R. Wengrzyn (2013)

Associate Marketing Specialist of Athletics/B.A. Western Kentucky University

Jennifer M. Wenner (2000)

Professor of Geology/Ph.D. Boston University; B.A. Carleton College

Roger A. Wescott (2011)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of Admissions/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Peter J. Westort (2003)

Associate Professor of Business/Ph.D. University of Oregon; M.B.A. University of Southern Maine; B.A. St. Xavier University

Judith Westphal (2008)

Associate Professor of Nursing/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.S.N., B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Elizabeth A. Whalley (1998)

Director of Academic Advising/M.S.E., B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Patrick J. Wilkinson (1996)

Director of Polk Library/M.L.S. Indiana University; M.A., B.A. Drake University

Evan G. Williams (2014)

Assistant Professor of Philosophy/Ph.D. Rutgers State University-Newark; B.A. Princeton University

Jonathan A. Wilson (2008)

Coach of Athletics; Student Services Coordinator of Student Recreation and Wellness Center and Intramural Sports/B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Lenore P. Wineberg (1988)

Professor of Education and Human Services/Ed.D. George Peabody College; M.S. Roosevelt University; B.A. De Paul University

Brittnie Winker (2014)

Student Services Specialist of the Children’s Center/B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Erin Winterrowd (2010)

Assistant Professor of Psychology/Ph.D., M.S. Colorado State University; B.A. Williamette University

Steven J. Winters (1993)

Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. Western Michigan University; M.S., B.S. University of Minnesota

Robert R. Wise (1993)

Professor of Biology and Microbiology/Ph.D., M.S. Duke University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Stevens Point

Lori M. Worm (1991)

Associate Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services/M.S. Silver Lake College; B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

William C. Wresch (1997)

Associate Dean; Professor of Business/Ph.D., M.S. University of Wisconsin Madison; M.A., B.A. California State University

Gregory B. Wypiszynski (1996)

Director of Graduate Studies/M.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; B.A. University of Wisconsin Whitewater

Linfeng Xie (1993)

Professor of Chemistry/Ph.D. University of Rochester; B.S. Zhejiang University

Houa Xiong (2003)

Senior Advisor of Academic Advising/M.S.E., B.S. University of Wisconsin La Crosse

Mai Khou Xiong (2013)

Associate Advisor of Academic Support of Inclusive Excellence/M.S., B.B.A. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Thomas J. Xiong (2004)

Student Services Coordinator of Admissions/M.S.W. University of Wisconsin Madison; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Abbas Yaghmaian (1998)

Senior Advisor of Academic Support of Inclusive Excellence/M.S., B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Fredrick L. Yeo (2005)

Dean; Professor of Education and Human Services/Ed.D. University of North Carolina, Greensboro; J.D. Western States College of Law; B.A. University of California

Kazimierz J. Zaniewski(1991)

Professor of Geography/Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; M.A., B.A. Warsaw University

Angela R. Zemke (2012)

Associate Student Services Coordinator of Reeve Memorial Union/M.A. Ball State University; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Hong Zhang (1999)

Associate Professor of Mathematics/Ph.D. University of Georgia; M.S., B.S. Beijing Normal University

Kristi L. Ziolkowski (2014)

Clinical Nurse Specialist of the Student Health Center/M.S.N., B.S.N. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Julie A. Zuleger (2002)

Lecturer of Education and Human Services/Ph.D. Capella University; M.S. Silver Lake College-Holy Family; B.S. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh



 

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