English Department Course Offerings

The English Department offers a variety of courses to meet major, degree, and USP requirements. 

You may visit the Bulletin for full course descriptions and visit TitanWeb for the most up-to-date information about class days, times, instructors, and locations. For more information about the English Department’s programs, requirements, and other advising information, you may view the 2023-2024-English Major Handbook.

What to do if a course is full

English and WRT courses require a lot of individual attention, so we do not overenroll them. If a section is full, your surest bet is to pick a different section of the same course or a different course that meets the same requirement. If you need the specific course/section that is full, or if all options are full, you may add yourself to a waitlist. (Be sure you follow all steps as shown in the linked video; if the course is only in your cart and you haven’t completed enrollment onto the waitlist, you are not on the waitlist!) If you have an urgent need for a course or a question/issue with the waitlist, fill out our enrollment help form and we’ll get back to you.

Summer 2024

Summer English and WRT Courses

In Summer 2024, we will offer:

English 353/553, Early Modern British Literature: Online asynchronous, 1st 4 weeks, Christine Roth. Meets Area A1 for Sec Ed majors and minors, Area A1 for liberal arts majors and literature minors, and a literature requirement for creative writing minors. The 500-level section is open to MA students, CAPP adjuncts, and other high school dual-enrollment instructors.

English 227, Modern World Literature: Online asynchronous, 8 weeks, Duke Pesta. Open to Fox and Oshkosh students.

WRT 287, Advanced Writing: Online asynchronous, 8 weeks, with Abayo Animashaun, Karl Boehler, or Crystal Mueller. Open to Fox, Oshkosh, and online program students.

WRT 288, Advanced Writing – Connect: Online asynchronous, 8 weeks, Aaron Dunckel. 

Fall 2024

Courses for Liberal Arts Major Requirements

This section is a quick overview of which courses being offered in fall meet which of your major requirements. For course descriptions, in order by course number, look at the “Major/Minor Course Descriptions” drop-down below.

Core Courses

Eng 281, Introduction to English Studies, Abayo Animashaun, MW 3:30 – 5:00

Eng 381, Foundations of Literary Criticism, Kathryn Klein, MW 3:30 – 5:00

Eng 481, Seminar in English Studies: Writers and Writing Processes, Sam Looker-Koenigs, TTh 11:30 – 1:00

Area A1,  English Literary Tradition before 1700

Eng 448, Topics in Shakespeare, Christine Roth, TTh 9:40 – 11:10

Area A2, English Literary Tradition after 1700

No offering this semester

Area A3, American Literary Tradition

No offering this semester

Area A4, Literature by American Ethnic Writers and/or Post-Colonial Writers

Eng 370, Native American Literature, Pascale Manning, MW 1:50 – 3:20

Area B, Rhetoric/Linguistics

Eng 207, Introduction to Professional Writing, Adam Ochonicky, MW 1:50 – 3:20

Eng 388, Grant Writing Foundations, Crystal Mueller, TTh 9:40 – 11:10

Area C, Creative Writing

ENG 204, Introduction to Creative Writing

  • Oshkosh campus: Alayne Peterson, asynchronous online
  • Fox campus: Bill Gillard, TTh 1:20 – 2:50

ENG 343, Nature Writing: Writing the Climate Crisis, Douglas Haynes, TTh 1:20 – 2:50

(Note: 343 will not show as an Area C option on your advisement report by default, but we will be submitting forms to count it in this area for fall 2024.)

Area D, Specialized Literary or Cultural Studies

English 324, Gender in Literature: Gender in Science Fiction, Jordan Landry, MWF 12:40 – 1:40

English 403, Feminist Thought and Practice, Ula Klein, TTh 9:40 – 11:10

Additional Course Opportunities:

French 350, Masterpieces of French Literature in English Translation, Nadia Louar, online asynchronous (eligible for a curricular modification to count for English major/minor elective credit–email us for details)

English 703, Seminar in Theory and Criticism: Ecocriticism, Stewart Cole, Weds 5-8 online synchronous (If you have over 90 credits, you are eligible to enroll in graduate courses–email us for details)

Courses for Secondary Education Major Requirements

This section is a quick overview of which courses being offered in fall meet which of your major requirements. For course descriptions, in order by course number, look at the “Major/Minor Course Descriptions” drop-down below.

Core Courses

Eng 281, Introduction to English Studies, Abayo Animashaun, MW 3:30 – 5:00

Eng 381, Foundations of Literary Criticism, Kathryn Klein, MW 3:30 – 5:00

Eng 481, Seminar in English Studies: Writers and Writing Processes, Sam Looker-Koenigs, TTh 11:30 – 1:00

Area A1,  English Literary Tradition

No offering this semester

Area A2, American Literary Tradition

No offering this semester

Area A3, Shakespeare

Eng 448, Topics in Shakespeare, Christine Roth, TTh 9:40 – 11:10

Area A4, Literature by American Ethnic Writers and/or Post-Colonial Writers

Eng 370, Native American Literature, Pascale Manning, MW 1:50 – 3:20

Area B, Linguistics

No offering this semester

Area C, Creative Writing

ENG 204, Introduction to Creative Writing

  • Oshkosh campus: Alayne Peterson, asynchronous online
  • Fox campus: Bill Gillard, TTh 1:20 – 2:50

ENG 343, Nature Writing: Writing the Climate Crisis, Douglas Haynes, TTh 1:20 – 2:50

(Note: 343 will not show as an Area C option on your advisement report by default, but we will be submitting forms to count it in this area for fall 2024.)

Area D, Specialized Literary or Cultural Studies

English 324, Gender in Literature: Gender in Science Fiction, Jordan Landry, MWF 12:40 – 1:40

English 403, Feminist Thought and Practice, Ula Klein, TTh 9:40 – 11:10

Area E, Young Adult Literature

Courses for Minor Requirements

This is a quick list of the courses being offered in fall that count for each of our minors. See the “Major/Minor Course Descriptions” drop-down below for descriptions, instructors, and times.

Creative Writing Minor

  • English 281 is required for all minors
  • English 204 and 343 count toward the four required creative writing courses (Note: 343 will not show here on your advisement report by default, but we will be submitting forms to count it in this area for fall 2024.)
  • English 324, 370, 403, and 448 count toward the two required literature courses. French 350 and English 703 (for students with 90+ credits) are also options–email for details.

Linguistics Minor

  • English 281 is an elective option for the minor
  • Outside of English, other fall elective options are Comm 318, Comp Sci 381, Poli Sci 253, Poli Sci 304, Psych 305, Psych 380, Psych 391, and Span 312.

Literature Minor

Use the “Liberal Arts Major” list above for courses for each of your requirements.

Professional Writing Minor

English 207 is required for the minor. English 388 fulfills an elective requirement for the minor. An internship course may be taken whenever you have completed the prerequisite.

Rhetoric Minor

  • English 281 is required for the minor.
  • English 207 and 388 are elective options for the minor.

Secondary Education Minor

Use the “Secondary Ed Major” list above for each of your requirements.

Graduate Courses

Below are the graduate-level courses offered in Fall 2024. See the “Course Descriptions” drop-down above for more information.

Eng 524, Gender in Literature (Gender in Science Fiction), Jordan Landry, MWF 12:40 – 1:40

ENG 543, Nature Writing (Writing the Climate Crisis), Douglas Haynes, TTh 1:20 – 2:50 (This course counts as an elective for the Creative Writing certificate.)

Eng 581, Foundations of Literary Criticism, Kathryn Klein, MW 3:30 – 5:00

Eng 648, Shakespeare II, Christine Roth, TTh 9:40 – 11:10

Eng 703, Seminar in Theory and Criticism (Ecocriticism: Reading Literature from Ecological Perspectives), Stewart Cole, Weds 5:00 – 8:00 (online synchronous)

Major, Minor, and Graduate Course Descriptions
 

ENG 204, Introduction to Creative Writing

An introduction to a number of creative written and/or graphic genres including poems, concrete poems, prose-poems, short stories, cartoons, plays, and graphic novels, plus approaches to reading and writing about related texts.

ENG 207, Introduction to Professional Writing

This course provides an overview of the genre and research practices found in professional writing. Students will be exposed to a variety of professional writing scenarios to develop effective writing in workplace and community settings, including (but not limited to) project pitches, memo writing, visual rhetoric and social media. As a class, we will also interrogate notions of professionalism. The goal of the course is for students to understand the identity and work of the professional writer as it shifts across rhetorical situations. Topics include the standards, conventions, and technologies of professional writing; communicating to a variety of audiences; and developing appropriate written responses to workplace challenges.

ENG 281, Introduction to English Studies

An introduction to the many facets of English study, including the close analysis of texts, the rhetorical situation of the author and text, theoretical and critical approaches to textual analysis, and strategies for composing within and about a variety of genres both creatively and persuasively. Required for all English majors and minors; recommended for students contemplating an English major or minor. Prerequisites:  Writing 188, Writing 101 or Writing 110 and any 200-level English course, or department permission.

ENG 324/524, Gender in Literature (Topic: Gender in Science Fiction)

This course will examine works by a range of sci-fi writers such as Nalo Hopkinson, Octavia Butler, Rivers Solomon, and Margaret Atwood. Whereas science fiction often features entirely unheard-of alternative societies, speculative fiction takes contemporary events and attempts to extrapolate a future from them. Together, these texts will take us on a journey to explore the horrors that emerge with new versions of chattel slavery, genetically engineered animals, and human cults. Yet, they will also provide us with hope and inspiration as they imagine activism, community-building, and even revolution as a way to build alternative futures.

ENG 343/543, Nature Writing (Topic: Writing the Climate Crisis)

This interdisciplinary course will focus on contemporary writers’ visions of the climate crisis and how to respond to it. We will study literary, artistic, and multimedia representations of the ways the climate crisis affects different people and places differently, especially marginalized people and places. We will also investigate the hopeful possibilities of language, imagination, education, storytelling, and collective action as responses to the climate crisis. The course texts will include poetry, nonfiction, and fiction, as well as podcasts and short films. Students will also undertake their own creative projects that represent their own personal and local engagement with the climate crisis. Classes will be held both in and out of the classroom.

ENG 370, Native American Literature

A study of Native American literature, which may include oral tradition, poetry, and surrounding cultural materials.

ENG 381/581, Foundations of Literary Criticism

An investigation of modern literary theories, critical approaches, and their application to selected literary texts. Prerequisite: English 281. 381/581

Eng 388, Grant Writing Foundations

This course teaches the genre of grant writing from both academic and non-profit spheres. Students will learn how to identify potential grant funders, learn about the various components of a grant, and will have practice writing a tailored grant proposal. Student writing will represent a significant portion of the coursework.

Eng 448/648, Topics in Shakespeare

An advanced seminar in Shakespeare that addresses the plays and poems thematically or centered on a specific topic or approach. (Note: While this course is called “Shakespeare II,” you don’t need to have taken any previous Shakespeare courses to enroll.)

Eng 481, Seminar in English Studies (Topic: Writers and Writing Processes)

This course anchors itself in Writing Studies research on writing processes, which helps us understand how writers of everything from poems to novels to academic journal articles produce their work. We will gain theoretical grounding in this research, exploring how scholars’ thinking about writing processes has evolved in recent decades into its current rich complexity. We will also apply this theoretical grounding to examples of writing practice from professional writers, our colleagues, and ourselves. English 481 is an intensive capstone seminar emphasizing synthesis and evaluation of work completed in the English major. Seminar paper and portfolio self-assessment required.

Eng 703, Seminar in Theory and Criticism (Topic: Ecocriticism: Reading Literature from Ecological Perspectives)

A seminar focusing on ecocriticism as a major school of literary interpretation.

Quest and Explore Courses

ENG 151Q1, Quest I British Literature to the 18th Century (XC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Karl Boehler

ENG 154Q1, American Literature After the Civil War (XC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Aaron Dunckel

ENG 168Q1, Quest I Exploring Multiethnic Literature (XC, ES)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Jordan Landry
  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Kristin Vielbig

ENG 204, Introduction to Creative Writing (XC)

  • Online Oshkosh campus, Alayne Peterson
  • F2F Fox campus, Bill Gillard

ENG 207, Introduction to Professional Writing (XC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Adam Ochonicky

ENG 210, Classical and Medieval Literature (XC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Margaret Hostetler

ENG 218, Multi-Ethnic Literature (XC, ES)

  • Online Oshkosh campus, Abayo Animashaun

ENG 219, African-American Literature (XC, ES)

  • Online Oshkosh campus, Don Dingledine
  • Online Fox campus, Scott Emmert

ENG 223, Young Adult Literature (XC pending)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Christine Roth

ENG 224/WGS 224, Women in Literature (XC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Lisa Schreibersdorf
  • Online Oshkosh campus, Lisa Schreibersdorf

ENG 226, Modern American Literature (XC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Robert Feldman

ENG 226Q2, Quest II Modern American Literature (XC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Stephen McCabe

ENG 227, Modern World Literature (XC, GC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Duke Pesta

ENG 228, Honors Modern American Literature (XC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Robert Feldman

ENG 229, Honors African American Literature (XC, ES)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Don Dingledine

ENG 243/ES 243, Introduction to Nature Writing (XC, GC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Douglas Haynes
  • F2F Fox campus, Bill Gillard

ENG 284, Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature (XC)

  • F2F Oshkosh campus, Alayne Peterson