Author Archive for jenkir81

Time Management Advice

Rebecca JenkinsonI believe the key to time management is preparation and organization. Taking that first week before your course begins to read over the syllabus and any assignments that are already posted will help you tremendously. If any of the assignments are posted, such as reading, you can really get a headstart on the course, which can alleviate any feelings of “being behind.” Seven week courses are really condenced and often there can be a great amount of reading that is due weekly, so getting ahead can reduce any anxiety.

Find a schedule that works for you. When you do your best work? Or what time do you have available? Set small goals. I found that doing more throughout the week keeps me on track, like if I were to read one of out three chapters the first day of that week – then I would do one discussion posting that is relevant to the reading. Some weeks may be busier than others, planning accordingly at the start of each week so you know how to compensate for lack of study time on those days.

The constant theme in my courses have been Sunday is the last day of the week where assignments are due. Knowing this every Sunday night before bed, I wipe off my dry erase board of past assignments and write the new assignments for the next week. Monday mornings I start fresh, look at my dry erase board and I feel prepared and ready to get started! I can not stress it enough, organization!!

Rebecca Jenkinson, 31, is a Bachelor’s of Applied Studies in Leadership and Organizational Studies student from Berlin, Wis. Jenkinson was inspired to go back to college in 2011 by her desire to work in human resources, and she said she also hopes to be a role model for her four children.

What it means to take online courses

Rebecca JenkinsonRebecca Jenkinson, 31, is a Bachelor’s of Applied Studies in Leadership and Organizational Studies student from Berlin, Wis. Jenkinson was inspired to go back to college in 2011 by her desire to work in human resources, and she said she also hopes to be a role model for her four children.

Online courses were very appealing to me, the convenience of staying in my own home and doing my homework, “whenever” seemed easy. But taking an online course is more than reading a book and submitting your answers at your leisure. It takes organization, planning and effort to be successful in an online environment.

Courses are all in the same place in the D2L site, which makes it easy to go from one to another. The syllabus and other assignments are online, printing out the contents and putting it in a three-ring binder makes it easier to be organized. Reading the syllabus before the course starts, becoming familiar with deadlines and assignments will also be beneficial.

After starting my first classes online, I realized I needed an environment that would assist me, at doing my best. Not only does that mean having my own little office with a dry erase board of weekly due dates, table, computer and comfy chair, but it also means planning a time when the kids are occupied or in bed.

Being a stay-at-home mom, makes it difficult because I am at home most of the day, which makes it very tempting to work on my homework. Sometimes, I’m able to complete little assignments or discussion posts, but I would be dreaming if I thought I could do assignments and not be interrupted. I am most productive after the kids have gone to bed.

Taking more than one online class at a time means being connected every day, often multiple times a day. Often I am checking the discussion board to see if anyone has replied to my post and then replying if needed. Checking in multiple times a day has been made easier for me because I use my phone and a tablet and the UWO app, to access D2L anywhere and be involved in discussions. Being connected so often helps me to stay current and not procrastinate.

LLCE courses go fast, waiting to find a groove may not happen, so being as prepared as possible right from the start will be very beneficial!

Finding the right fit

Rebecca JenkinsonRebecca Jenkinson, 31, is a Bachelor’s of Applied Studies in Leadership and Organizational Studies student from Berlin, Wis. Jenkinson was inspired to go back to college in 2011 by her desire to work in human resources, and she said she also hopes to be a role model for her four children.

It was the fall of 2011. I was searching for something, but I didn’t know what it was. I was a stay-at-home-mom of four kids in a blended family, and at that time the kids were one and half, three, 10 and 12 years old. I wondered what I would do once the kids were in school full-time, so I searched the regular job websites. Soon I began to realize all of my “dream” human resource jobs required a bachelor’s degree.

I had my associate degree from Fox Valley Technical College in Appleton, Wis. in human resources management. Part of the associate degree was completed online, and the other part was through an accelerated program that I attended night classes for. I knew I could transfer my credits from the associate degree to go back to school for my bachelor’s, and my hope was to find something convenient to fit with our busy lifestyle.

Searching for the right school happened immediately, and all the typical online schools were researched. I had lots of conversations with sales people with the title of an “adviser” who made me believe they cared about my well-being. Then, it dawned on me that I lived so close to UWO, why wouldn’t I consider them? I called and had a great conversation with an adviser who wasn’t trying to sell me on their school, she was honest and informative.

My credits were transferred over and I began school in January 2012 for Leadership and Organizational Studies through the Division of Lifelong Learning and Community Engagement at UWO. It didn’t take long to feel like I had a plan for the future, and I was doing something great for myself and was a positive influence on the family. Not only do I want to help support our family financially, but I want to be proud of myself and be a great role model for our children.


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