Tag Archive for 'Social Media'

Be Present Online – Keep Yourself Updated

By conducting a search on Google, anyone may be able to find out a lot of information about you. Someone could figure out your interests, your friends, your job status and even find photos of you. You should expect potential employers to type your name into a search engine to find more information about that wasn’t included in your resume. Try Googling yourself right now and see what shows up. Do you like what you see or should you make some online updates? It is important to remember your presence online when you are searching for career opportunities because how you appear online is valuable in setting a foundation for yourself. Here are some tips to help you avoid letting your online existence decline:

  1. Be Consistent

Make sure all of your information online is current and updated.    You don’t want your online information to be different from your resume. Having a clear and revised online presence, especially on professional networking sites like LinkedIn, will show off your experience, but also your other transferrable skills.

2. Update Frequently       

If you have a blog or a Twitter page that has been untouched for months, it shows that you are not committed anymore. Make sure that you and your social media accounts are up to date before you begin looking/applying for positions.

3.  Increase Your Credibility

Using social media as a way to highlight yourself and your  accomplishments is a great idea. Social media shows potential employers that you are interested in the field you are applying. If you are interested in public relations, you should be following  public relations firms or experts. This will show the employer that you truly are interested in this topic.

4.  Stand Out in the Crowd

In today’s economy, the job market is so competitive and recruiters are looking for people that stand out. Be sure to tailor your resume to demonstrate your skills and use words in your resume that will catch a recruiter’s attention.

Check out this Career Spots video on the Perils of Social Networking

Make the Most of Each Post

Social media is becoming more and more important for networking and connecting with potential employers. The purpose of these posts are to share information and connect with our intended online community. So why do some posts go viral while others are swept under the rug?

An essential part of posting in order to build your online presence is the time that you choose to post! Pay attention as we unveil the ultimate guide to getting the most traffic out of each post and how to be heard.

  • LinkedIn: Let’s start with your most professional profile. 7-9 AM and 5-6 PM Tuesday through Thursday is the optimal opportunity for networking and getting noticed among potential employers. Leave LinkedIn alone between 10 PM and 6 AM, especially on Mondays and Fridays.
  • Facebook: The best time to post to Facebook is on Wednesdays at 3:00 PM, with the worst time being after 4:00PM and on the weekends.
  • Twitter: Tweeting between 1-3 PM on Mondays is optimal Twitter traffic time, but any time between 9 AM and 3 PM Monday through Thursday will get noticed by your fellow tweeters. Twitter traffic jams occur after 3 PM, meaning those posts aren’t going to be getting very far with your intended audience.
  • Pinterest: The newest queen on the social media scene is Pinterest. So how do we make sure our pins receive royal attention? Pin between 2-4 PM or after 8 PM-1 AM when all the online night owls congregate. Saturday mornings are peak pinning time. Avoid those Pinterest boards between 5-7 PM.

We observe excellent audience interaction on Mondays for our UW Oshkosh Career Services’ social media sites. What works best for you?

This infographic from Mediabistro sums up the prime times for posting to all your different social media sites!

what-is-the-best-time-to-post-on-social-media-sites_504e9245de2e9

 

Tweet to Connect, Master Twitter Networking With These Tips

Twitter is the latest form of networking that is blowing up social-media using a form known as micro-blogging. Twitter limits users to 140 characters per post and allows linking to websites, connecting to other people or organizations by mentioning their Twitter handle (which is what we call the username with an @ symbol in front of it), and also hash tagging.

Users are free to use their Twitter account however they choose, whether it’s for personal expression, business, humor, social networking or information sharing. However, employers do take Twitter and social networking sites into consideration when getting to know prospective employees. For example, your drunken tweet from Saturday night with a picture of you doing a beer bong may have just cost you the job opportunity.

Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube are several sites that are changing the field of PR, new media and traditional media. It’s much more than a rolling news feed of status updates. It’s a source for advertising, talking with consumers, engaging other groups, promoting products or events, providing customer service and demonstrating service with pictures.

So how can you use Twitter professionally?

By using @ you can connect to specific users and create a relationship with them.

The hash tag # symbol makes your tweets searchable and allows you to join in chats. It allows you to follow certain news and connect with other tweeters.

Make your Twitter you personal brand. Remember: Be interesting. Avoid toilet tweets. No one wants to know about your bodily functions. It’s also best to avoid sexual, religious, political and obscene tweets. Connect with professionals by sharing useful and intelligent or informational links. You can shrink the links to save space for descriptions or ideas by using link-shortening sites like bitly.com.

Check out this info-graphic from Mediabistro.com pertaining to social websites and employment. http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwitter/twitter-posts-job_b27156

Social media affects employment opportunities.

Social media affects employment opportunities.

 

LinkedIn: Why don’t people accept my requests?

By Craig Smith

Social networking is the current way of the world.  We have put ourselves in situations where we can be as distant and obscure as possible so as not to actually verbally communicate with someone. While this has increased the ability for employers to network with mass numbers and allowed young adults to avoid their fear of face-to-face networking, it has not removed from all of us that feeling of rejection. The question is, why are we getting rejected or not responded to?

If we focus on the social network of LinkedIn, we tend to make the exact same mistakes we would at a networking event. The toughest thing to do is approach somebody and start the conversation. The beauty of LinkedIn is that the employer is already open to conversation by having a profile, so approaching them is easy. Just like in face-to-face interactions, if I have met the employer or I have had a class, group, club or organization in which they spoke, I have an easy approach to introduce myself. I would not just approach them and say “I’d like to add you to my professional network.” Instead I would communicate to them how I knew them then quickly give my elevator pitch before asking a question about their company.

 

EX: “Hello Mr. Smith, I heard you speak during Social Justice Week on campus and really liked your passion for social work.”

ELEVATOR PITCH: “What do you think is the most important skill I should leave UW Oshkosh with?” or “What excites you the most about your current position?”

 

You do not have to worry too much about your elevator pitch because it is already done on your profile. So, what is the next step in networking? Remember, the best networkers listen 80 percent of the conversation and speak less than 20 percent, and with your elevator pitch already done for you, you can go right into your question.

 

EX. “Hello Mr. Smith, I heard you speak during Social Justice Week on campus and really liked your passion for social work and was hoping to connect with you here on LinkedIn. What do you think is the most important skill I should leave UW Oshkosh?”

 

The ability to network cannot be completely dismissed because we have found a way to be less personal in our approach. The keys to networking have not changed; they just need to be adapted.

  1. What is my reason for approach? Examples:
    1. I have researched their company and want to know more
    2. I have met them in the past and want to develop our relationship further
    3. I have heard them speak or present and want to develop our relationship further
  1. Do I have an Elevator Pitch and up-to-date online profile? Examples:
    1. Who I am, what I am interested in for a career
    2. My path, my skills/strengths
  1. How do I get them to talk about themselves? Examples:
    1. Something you researched or heard them talk about that you really want to know more about
    2. How they got started, what was their path
    3. What strengths/skills they think are of the greatest worth in their industry

The more personal we are, the more difficult we are to dismiss. The more vague and obscure we are, the less relatable we become. It is important to remember that some people take time to respond to their LinkedIn profile requests, emails and/or phone calls. Be patient. Be a networker without being a pest and always network with a purpose.

Click here to learn more about LinkedIn.

Social Media and Your Job Search

By Sheng Lee (@shengdanger)

Since the dawn of social media, employers have been searching for online information on possible job candidates. With people updating their profiles every day, scouring social media sites is a great way to conduct general background checks. Some companies even go so far as to ask for your login information during the interview. Are you prepared to bare it all?

E. Chandlee Bryan, a career coach and co-author of the book “The Twitter Job Search Guide,” said job seekers should always be aware of what’s on their social media sites and assume someone is going to look at it. According to Professional Resume Services, these are not the days of three traditional references anymore. Nowadays, your three references are Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. It’s obvious that everything you post online will be seen by someone, so the key is to conduct yourself professionally online as you would in real life.

People have been fired and not hired because of distasteful comments or photos. But here’s how you can prevent or improve your online reputation. First, survey the damage. Google yourself and see what sort of content shows up on the first five pages. Anything troubling? Mark it for action. Then sign up for the alerts available at spots like Google Alerts; when information about you is added or updated, you’ll find out via email.

Because all published content on the Internet is archived on Internet Archive, a nonprofit initiative designed to be a resource for historians and researchers, completely deleting something is almost impossible. That’s why you bury the bad with the good. Create new content such as a blog or personal website that highlights your skills and positive attributes. Have your work published with different credible sites. These actions don’t make the bad stuff go away, but it will show employers that you are serious about portraying yourself professionally.

If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile already, create one. If you are on LinkedIn, strengthen your profile by filling out all fields. LinkedIn is one of the top sites that pop up when a name is entered into Google, so make it the first thing an employer sees. People are searching for you, make sure you paint the picture of yourself that you want them to see.

 

Vote for your favorite CFOTF t-shirt design!

This year’s Career Fair on the Fox t-shirt is a sky-blue with yellow, orange and black bubble lettering. What will next year’s design be? YOU choose! Just log in to Facebook, “like” our Facebook page and then “like” your favorite photo in our “CFOTF T-shirt Design 2012-2013″ album.

Our Career Services street team will be in Reeve Union Concourse on February 28 and April 19 with FREE t-shirts and Jolly Ranchers. You can vote at that time to receive one of these cool blue shirts, or simply drop by our offices in the Student Success Center suite 125!


Possible t-shirt design for Career Fair on the Fox 2012-2013. This design will be camouflage playing off of Wisconsinites’ love of the great outdoors!

Possible t-shirt design for Career Fair on the Fox 2012-2013. This design features Foxy our mascot!

Possible t-shirt design for Career Fair on the Fox 2012-2013. Purple and orange t-shirt with a play on words!

Movers and Shakers: UWO Journalism student Sheng Lee talks about her STEP position

 

Movers and Shakers: Derek Schroeder – “You’ve got to be in it to get it”

By Derek Schroeder (@Derek_Schroeder)

We’ve all got a dream job in our heads, not the do nothing and get paid millions job, but the dream job where you work in the industry you want and for a company that you dig. For myself it’s doing public relations for a bicycle company or being an event planner/manager for a cyclocross racing series.

Now that you know my dream let me explain how I took the first step in getting there. I’ve had a few internships before I landed my dream internship doing public relations consulting for November Bicycles. My advice, take that first unpaid internship if you can’t find anything else and then try to get another internship through the university.

Next comes the fun part, ask yourself: “What am I passionate about?” I don’t mean school, I mean what do you do on you’re free time (which seems to be harder and harder these days)? For me it was cyclocross, I practically live and breathe it. I set up a search for the word “cyclocross” on my Hootsuite account and started following everyone that tweeted anything of importance.

Then I saw that November Bicycles was hosting a sweepstakes to win one of their cyclocross bicycles, but there was a catch there had to be 2345 entries for them to give bike away. So of course seizing the opportunity, I signed up for the sweepstakes, and shared it on all of my social media channels.

This is where following the word “cyclocross” came into play again. I saw @Aaron_Spicer Tweet, “Today would be a great day for me if I had a cyclocross bike! But alas… I do not.”

Of course I had to do something:

And thus I was on the radar of @NovemberBikes who right away thanked me for passing on their contest.

After that my now boss, Mike May, sent me a direct message on Twitter saying he had viewed my “background” on Twitter and my blog, which I started as part of Professor Sara Steffes Hansen’s #UWONEWMEDIA course. Several emails were exchanged and I was the new public relations intern for November Bicycles.

If this story teaches you anything, you must follow your passions to land that job or internship that you’ve always dreamed of. So go follow your passions!

 

Wisconsin Career Development Association’s Conference in Madison

By Cassie Curry

On Wednesday morning Chrissy Lambie, Angela Victor and I met bright and early at the fleet vehicle site. After being shocked into a state of alertness by the smell of the biodigester and Starbucks, we headed to Madison for a morning of professional development.

While in Madison Chrissy, Angela and I attended the Wisconsin Career Development Association’s conference on technology in the job search. The focus was on five areas including: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Skype and email/online job applications.

Sarah Barber and Kelly Cuene researched and presented on the topic. Sarah is the special projects manager at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Continuing Studies. Kelly is the assistant director of advising and career planning at UW-Madison.

UWO Career Services already uses and educates students on the above five technologies, but Sarah and Kelly were able to share some of the feedback they have received from employers regarding the use of these technologies.

The staff at Career Services is dedicated to getting their students the best and most up to date information. As a staff, we have professional development goals, which can be met by attending conferences, workshops and educating themselves through books and social media. These goals are in place to make sure the students continue to receive the best information when they visit Career Services.

Feedback from employers

LinkedIn

  • When job searching please connect to the company you are interviewing rather than the individual interviewing you.
  • The only time you should connect with individuals is if you already have a relationship with them or you are having another connection introduce you.
  • If you have no connections to an individual and don’t know their email address, don’t list them as a friend on LinkedIn just to get the connection. This is awkward; the point of LinkedIn is to connect to people you know with similar professional interests.
  • Don’t forget you can job search on LinkedIn!

Facebook

  • It is very important to connect with the company rather than the individual person.
  • Employers will be checking out your Facebook page. Make sure your privacy settings are high and your profile picture is appropriate.
  • Don’t delete your Facebook profile at the beginning of your job search. Your potential employer will wonder about the content you deleted.

Twitter

  • The importance of Twitter in your job search depends on your industry.
  • Following a company on Twitter can be a great way to research that company.
  • You can connect with both organizations and individuals on Twitter.
  • Make sure your Twitter profile is filled out and you are posting about things relevant to your industry. You want the organization to follow you too.
  • If you are majoring in a field like marketing or journalism you should be using Twitter actively. Your Twitter handle should be at the top of your resume!

Skype

  • Skype can be a green and inexpensive way for companies to interview students, but most companies are still worried about the technical difficulties that can arise.
  • UWO Career Services frequently offers Skype interviews. There is usually a Skype opportunity during mock interviews as well.

E-mail and Online Applications

  • Know that you will probably be applying to jobs online and communicating with employers through email; this communication should be as professional as a research paper. You are not texting!
  • You will probably be filling out an online application. Even most fast food restaurants require online applications.

Meet Cassie Curry, College of Letters and Science career adviser for UW Oshkosh, on YouTube!

8 tips for a professional LinkedIn profile

By Sheng Lee (@shengdanger)
Linked in is the well-known dark horse of social media. We all know it exists, but few use it to its full potential. This is a major mistake. When it comes to marketing yourself, most people go straight to Facebook because of its considerable user base, but demographically speaking, LinkedIn is ahead in the social media race with over 135 million users worldwide, 77 percent of users are age 25 and older, and the average household income of users is $109,000. If you want to get serious about social networking, ditch the Facebook playground and graduate to LinkedIn.

LinkedIn is a network of professionals who are the movers and shakers of their industries. Yes, Facebook and Twitter can be powerful tools, but LinkedIn users are known for their no-nonsense sentiments when it comes to their jobs, industry and social network. So keep in mind that while it’s fun to post silly pictures on Facebook and tweet about what you had for lunch on Twitter, the conversations on LinkedIn are more focused on cultivating partnerships and advancing business.

LinkedIn tips:

1.)    Complete your profile

Did you know that your Linkedin profile generally ranks in the top five Google search results for your first and last name? Make sure your profile is completely filled out, because first impressions are everything. Skimping on your personal profile will decrease your value, so take the time to tell people what you’re all about.

2.)    Connect with everyone

When it comes to making connections, get out of your comfort zone. Connecting with people you already know and trust limits your network. Remember: There are 135 million members out there to connect with! The more direct connections you have, the larger your network will be, creating more business opportunities in the long run.

3.)    Customize your URL and websites

Customize your URL and websites to reflect your name. You can do this by finding the “edit profile” option from the “profile” tab at the top of the website. If you have a blog or website to add, scroll down to the “additional information” section of your LinkedIn profile. Click the “edit” button. Select “other” in the dropdown menu and customize its name. A customized website name will inspire others to click through your sites.

4.)    Spice up your image

Your profile now needs some pizzazz and style. A bland, lifeless profile turns off potential connections, so let your personal creativity shine through. Use stories, video recommendations etc. to tell others who you are, what you’re all about and how you can help them advance professionally.

5.)    Recommend others

Recommend others as much as you can, and they will reciprocate. The more you give, the more you receive!

6.)    Join groups

Join LinkedIn groups that will put you in touch with other experts in your industry. Try your hand at starting your own group and establish yourself as an expert in the field. Like a mini-social network, these niche groups will encourage discussions, spread your message and connect you with important people.

7.)    Optimize your search ranking

Many people use LinkedIn to search for experts in their field, a new job or connections. This is where optimization in keyword search is crucial. It takes time and effort to reach the top, but imagine how cool it would be if you rank number one when someone searches for “social” or “management” for example. A way to start is by incorporating your desired keywords into your headline, current work experience, past work experience, summary and specialties.

8.)    Add Apps

Lastly, add applications such as Twitter, WordPress and calendars to your profile. This will promote your work and improve your profile’s overall visitor experience.

 


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