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Courses

This list provides a preview of the interesting Quest II courses in which you will explore ethical dilemmas.

Please Note: This list is designed to give you an idea of the types of courses that have been approved and may be offered in a given semester. Not all courses on this list will be offered each semester. For a complete and accurate list of courses offered, please check Titan Web. Remember that all Quest courses are also Explore courses (Nature-XL, Culture-XC or Society-XS) and that each Quest II course is paired with either Quest Writing or Quest Speaking.  Be sure to choose a Quest II option that is paired with the course you did not encounter in Quest I (Writing or Speaking). Students who have earned credit for both Writing and Speaking will have the option to take an unpaired (UP) Quest II course.  Honors students complete Quest II and III with Honors 275.

Sustainability (SUS)

How do people understand and create a more sustainable world?

  • Chemistry 103: Environmental Chemistry (XL)

    What is environmental chemistry? How do scientists think about sustainability as it relates to the environment? How can chemistry help prevent, diagnose and cure environmental problems? Why, more than 50 years after Rachel Carson published Silent Spring, do we still face environmental degradation problems? In this course we will explore these questions and more. In order to fully understand and start to answer these questions I will help you develop a “chemical toolbox” of concepts and competencies that you can use.
  • Chemistry 104: Introduction to the Chemistry of Materials (XL)

    Description coming soon!
  • English 211: English Literature to the 18th Century (XC)

    The literature of the past gives us insight into who we are today and links us to a cultural inheritance. This course will look at a selection of literature from the classical/ancient period through the medieval—focusing on the tensions that exist between individuals and their communities, which spark ethical reflection. We will also examine how our present cultural values are influenced and shaped by these historical texts, such as Dante’s Divine Comedy and Sophocles’ Antigone.
  • English 226: Modern American Literature (XC)

    This course evaluates how sustainability issues are visible or lacking in two contemporary American novels—The Hunger Games and State of Wonder—as well as several modern American short stories and poems. Can these science fiction novels truly help us study sustainability? Yes! All good science fiction has realistic themes and characters that teach us so much about our world WHEN we read to learn!
  • English 227: Modern World Literature (XC) (NW)

    One of the most engaging ways of entering the world outside our home and horizons is through literature. Literature takes us imaginatively into worlds unlike our own, and lets us walk in another’s shoes for a while. While we may not change the world this way, we change ourselves and through that, we can impact the world. We learn to see ourselves as products of a culture, traditions and beliefs, even as we learn to see similarity in others.
  • English 247: Introduction to Shakespeare—A Quest for Ethics in Otherworlds of Play (XC)

    What can Shakespeare teach us about the ethical challenges that arise when the quest for personal fulfillment conflicts with shared efforts to create a more sustainable world?  This Introduction to Shakespeare course is a journey into Shakespeare’s theatre and the millennial Otherworlds of the internet, movies, and games to discover the transformational power of Play.
  • Philosophy 104: Ethics (XC)

    We often judge actions to be morally right or wrong, and their consequences to be morally good or bad. When such judgments result from moral reasoning (rather than, say, mere prejudice), they fall into patterns called "moral theories". In this class we will study a few of the most distinctive moral theories, and discuss how they can be applied to a variety of "sustainability issues", including the possible sources of a natural environment's value, the probable effects of an ever-increasing human population, and the ways in which any interests of non-human animals might figure into our moral considerations.
  • Philosophy 109: Introduction to Philosophy (XC)

    Philosophy investigates fundamental questions about the human condition. Does God exist? Do we have free will? Are we responsible for our actions? Is our way of life sustainable? Philosophers seek to produce and to evaluate arguments that, if correct, provide answers to these and other questions. In this course we will take a close look at some of these arguments. We will develop our ability to produce our own arguments as well as a critical capacity to evaluate our own arguments and those of others. In this class, we will become philosophers.
  • History 101: Early Civilizations (XS)

    The development of human societies is crucial to understanding our place in the world today. History 101 will trace the course of humanity from the earliest civilizations of Sumeria and Egypt, through Greece and Rome, to the rise of modern Europe. Although we touch on many aspects of these developments, the course emphasizes the relationship between humans and their environment across vast swaths of time, cultures, and territories.
  • Political Science 115: International Politics (XS)

    Description coming soon!
  • RELSTDS/WOM STDS 263: Women, Religion, Sustainability: From Green Nuns to Hindu Tree Huggers (XS)

    We all live in bodies, and we all live on the planet Earth. This class explores how women from different religions have sought to live sustainably on this planet, and how religious approaches to the world affect women's lives. We will assess this through units on four exciting themes: 1) Wonder and Nature, 2) Food, 3) People and Bodies, and 4) Myth and Ritual.

Civic Learning (CL)

How do people understand and engage in community life?

  • Biology 117: The Right and Wrong of Healthcare Science (XS)

    Doctors (and other healthcare providers) are intimately involved in important decisions by nearly every person in the nation, even to life-or-death.  Patients are often so mystified or intimidated by medical matters that they become frozen in indecision, or “just leave it up to the doctor” to decide.  Some patients even reject medical care for “quack” remedies that do more harm than good.  This course will examine how medical professionals know what they know, including ethical reasoning processes that apply to other kinds of decision making. We’ll also investigate why some patients reject scientific, medical knowledge for other avenues of treatment, and how advertising can be used to mislead the gullible among the public.  You’ll discover that “a grain of salt” goes a long way, and it’s not “brain surgery”!
  • English 210: Classical and Medieval Literature (XC)

    The classical texts of Western culture have shaped our identities and our communities in ways we often don’t even recognize—affecting our concepts of leadership, of law, of religion, and of love. This course will focus on works of literature, ranging from the classical Greek period to the medieval, that have shaped us as a people.
  • English 211: British Literature I (XC)

    The literature of the past gives us insight into who we are today and links us to a cultural inheritance. This course will look at a selection of literature from the classical/ancient period through the medieval—focusing on the tensions that exist between individuals and their communities, which spark ethical reflection. We will also examine how our present cultural values are influenced and shaped by these historical texts, such as Dante’s Divine Comedy and Sophocles’ Antigone.
  • English 212: British Literature II (XC)

    Description coming soon!
  • History 110: Topics in the History of Modern Civilization: Conformity and Resistance (XS)

    The Nazi dictatorship redefined citizenship through concrete demands. Many Germans conformed to Nazi demands, adjusting their lives and relationships to meet Nazi requirements. An important minority resisted for moral, personal, religious, or military reasons. This course will explore what made people resist when the great majority conformed while allowing us to consider the ways that we make decisions in our own lives.
  • History 202: Modern US History Since 1877: The Ethics of Democracy: Ethical Reasoning (XS)

    Description coming soon!
  • History 210: In our Time: The U.S. and the World Since 1978 (XS)

    History 210 aims to bring into relief a broad range of events, issues, ideas and personalities which you may be partly conscious of but until now have not completely grasped.  Taking this course will help you meet the lifelong challenge of understanding and engaging the world you inherited. It is, in short, a course I wish I had been able to take as a college freshman in 1984.
  • Music 110: Music, Ethics and Community (XC)

    Music is integral to identity and community. Every disparate culture on earth has a musical tradition. So how does the music one listens to relate to self, culture, one's value system, civic traditions, the public good, or personal expression? The question, “How do people understand and engage in community life?” guides our investigation of musical study through discussion and reflection. In this course, music is the tool that is used to evaluate ethical theories and core beliefs.
  • Philosophy 105: Ethics (XC) (NW)

    On a daily basis, we judge, evaluate, praise or blame individuals, organizations and governments.  Are there good reasons for us to make these judgments and evaluations?  Are there good reasons for us to judge or evaluate ethically?  Or are such judgments and evaluations only expressions of momentary feelings, joy at our success or anger at our failure?  We will explore the ethical theories that answer these and related questions, from the ancient (Plato's  and Aristotle's) to the modern (Kant's and Mill's).
  • Political Science 105: American Government and Politics (XS)

    Our government institutions, officials, and outputs create an environment which shapes our understanding of politics, opinions on issues, and even our political behavior.  In this class we will delve into the organization and principles that comprise the American National Government to gain a better understanding of its impact on our lives and connect with opportunities for civic engagement.

Intercultural Knowledge (IK)

How do people understand and bridge cultural differences?

  • African American Studies 101: Introduction to African American Studies (XC) (ES)

    Description coming soon!
  • Anthropology 232: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (XS) (NW)

    In this course, we will look across cultural groups and societies worldwide to explore how people construct the rationales that motivate their behavior and the meanings through which they understand their world. We take these cross-cultural analyses to reflect on ourselves and our own societies, examine the consequences of cultural categories and practices, and solve problems in our lives and world.
  • English 227: Modern World Literature (XC) (NW)

    One of the most engaging ways of entering the world outside our home and horizons is through literature. Literature takes us imaginatively into worlds unlike our own, and lets us walk in another’s shoes for a while. While we may not change the world this way, we change ourselves and through that, we can impact the world. We learn to see ourselves as products of a culture, traditions and beliefs, even as we learn to see similarity in others.
  • History 105: Topics in the History of Early Civilization: Conquest and Indigenous Resistance (XS)

    Description coming soon!
  • Philosophy 105: Ethics (XC) (NW)

    On a daily basis, we judge, evaluate, praise or blame individuals, organizations and governments. Are there good reasons for us to make these judgments and evaluations? Are there good reasons for us to judge or evaluate ethically? Or are such judgments and evaluations only expressions of momentary feelings, joy at our success or anger at our failure? We will explore the ethical theories that answer these and related questions, from the ancient (Plato's and Aristotle's) to the modern (Kant's and Mill's).
  • Political Science 101: Introduction to Comparative Politics (XS) (NW)

    This is a course about democracy: What is it? What does it take to sustain it? Is it worth it? We’ll explore political systems in transition to democracy (think Arab Spring), established democracies such as India, Brazil, and South Africa and political systems that are not democratic at all such as Iran and China. How government in these countries responds to social, cultural, economic, ethnic, and religious divisions can tell us a lot about building and sustaining democracy.
  • Sociology 153: Intercultural Exploration of Families (XS) (ES)

    Description coming soon!
  • Theatre 152: Non-Western Theatre (XC) (NW)

    Theatre, as an art form, is part of the fabric of culture across the world.  In this course, we will focus on the art and production of theatre in non-western countries.