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Celebration-UWO-Web-BannerThe breadth and depth of subjects available to study at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh—from art and anthropology to physics and psychology—will be well-represented Thursday at the 22nd-annual Celebration of Scholarship in Reeve Memorial Union.

More than 60 undergraduate and graduate students will give presentations, display their artwork and show their research and project posters at the daylong event.

“This is a great opportunity for UW Oshkosh students to think outside the classroom walls,” said Susan Surendonk, Oshkosh Student Scholarly and Creative Activities Program administrator.

Graduate student Andrew Mannebach kicks off the presentations at 9:30 a.m. in Reeve 214, with his study “A War for Manhood: An Interregional Comparison of 19th-Century Masculinity and Football.” He worked with history faculty member Michelle Kuhl on the project.

Two undergraduate history students mentored by Stephen Kercher follow Mannebach: Kelley Teague, “This is Thriller!” and Nathan Wolff, “Rhoda: A Realistic Depiction of a 1970s woman.”

At 9:30 a.m. in Reeve 215, two other presentations will take place: graduate student Nana Adjoa Coleman’s “Fraudulent Billing and Improper Medicare and Medicaid Payments: New Solutions to Old Problems,” with public administration faculty member Anna Filipova; and Tristan Greening’s “Mating Behaviors of Captive 13-Lined Ground Squirrels,” with biology faculty member Dana Merriman.

From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., graduate student Irineo Medina and undergraduate Valeria Sacco will offer their visual art presentations “Broken Spanish,” and “Atmos,” respectively, in Reeve Ballroom 227. Medina works with art faculty members Jeff Lipschutz and Gail Panske, while Sacco is paired with Lipschutz.

In addition, dozens of students will take part in the poster session from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in Reeve Ballroom 227: Samantha J. Anderson, geology, “Lateral and Vertical Homogeneity in a Single Lava Flow, Southern Cascades;” Sara Arafeh, biology, “Inactivation of Sucrose Synthesis in the Cyanobacterium for Increased Production of Isoprenoid Hydrocarbons;” Linda Backus, nursing, “Clinical Microsystem Readmission Project;” Lauren Bane, geology, “Biogeochemical Marine Minerals Formed Below the Seafloor Off the Coast of Peru, South America: Implications for Phosphate Deposits and Ancient Analogs;” Scott Bender, geology, “Evolution of Porosity in Dolostones Due to Recrystalization and Cementation: An Example From the Oneota Formation, Ripon, Wisconsin;” Travis Brace, psychology and chemistry, “Connecting Isolated Female Faculty in the UW System;”

Elizabeth Cable, sociology, “Living in the Dorms: The Quality of Life in College;” Rhiannon Carr, biology, “Targeting Synthetic Genes to Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 for Production of Pinene as a Biofuel Feedstock;” Maame Esi Coleman, psychology and chemistry, “Connecting Isolated Female Faculty in the UW System;” Alexandria Ebert, psychology, “The Impact of State Mindfulness on Affective Forecasting,” and “Author Numbers and Genders Over Forty Years in Teaching of Psychology;” Julia Elkins, English, “The Metamorphoses of Ingmar Bergman’s The Virgin Spring in Wes Craven’s The Last House on the Left and Dennis Iliadis’s The Last House on the Left;” Jeffrey Farvour, biology, “The Role of CCL25 and CCR9 in Intestinal Immune Cell Changes During Hibernation;” Thomas Charles Gehrman Junior, physics and astronomy, “RR Lyrae Stars in the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy Globular Cluster Arp 2;”

Maria Graf, nursing, “Evidence-Based Strategies to Enhance New Faculty Orientation; Xiaoyi Gu, psychology, “Kinship and Judgments of Helping Behavior;” Courtney Heling, biology and geography, “The Spatial Distribution of Benthic Invertebrates in Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin;” Heather Hollander, nursing, “Evidence-Based Strategies to Enhance New Faculty Orientation;” Shelby Kelso, psychology, “The Impact of State Mindfulness on Affective Forecasting;” Thomas Kenote, sociology; “The Mamāceqtaw and the Education System: A Qualitative Case Study on the Educational Experiences of Menominee Indian Students;” Anna Kinderman, sociology, “Dog Personality Matching and Its Effects on Successful Adoptions and the Commodification of Dogs;” Patrick Klepp, biology, “Hymenobacter Species Dominate Freshwater Biofilms;” Allison Knoch, sociology, “Is There an Association Between Tattoos and Social Class?”

Thomas Kuborn, biology and chemistry, “Novel Method for the Identification of Deinococcus and Hymenobacter Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography;” Ryan Kussow, sociology, “UW Oshkosh Academic Success Project” Amanda Leichtfuss, chemistry, “Natural Gas Halogenation Using Metal Halide Photocatalysts and Renewable Energy;” Steven Lund, physics and astronomy, “Multi-Wavelength Study of the Star-Forming Field in the Constellation Cygnus, the Swan;” Addela Marzofka, sociology, “Extracurricular Involvement at UW Oshkosh: The Impact on Academic Achievement;” Franki Mayer, biology, “Inactivation of the CpcB Light-Harvesting Protein in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Cyanobacteria for Increased Cell Density and Bioproduct Yields;” Samantha Miller, psychology, “Kinship and Judgments of Helping Behavior;” Kaitlyn Nielsen, biology, “Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Alter Mucosal Associated Bacteria;”

Michaela Otto, criminal justice; “Women in Law Enforcement: An Examination of Female Interest in Policing;” Timothy Pionk, psychology, “Emotional Callousness and Emotional Responses to Those in Need: A Direct Replication Study;” Piper Poe, geology, “Textural Alteration of Late Permian Brachiopods: Implications for Understanding Replacement Reactions in Biomineralized Skeletal Material;” Sharayah Preman, psychology, “The Influence of Player Character Role, Game Choice, and Fantasy Tendency on Aggression Following Violent Video Game Play; Tulio Ribeiro, geology, “Bedding Dip Patterns in the Southern McMurdo Sound Drill Core (AND-2A), Victoria Land Basin, Antarctica;  Erik Robinson, physics and astronomy, “Multi-Wavelength Study of the Star-Forming Field in the Constellation Cygnus, the Swan;

Taylor Rydahl, computer science, “Algorithm Visualizations for the λ-Calculus;” Shariah Salahaladyn, criminal justice, “African American Males in College: Following Their Educational Journey at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh;” Elizabeth Schmidt, criminal justice, “History of Marijuana Laws in the United States;” Lucas Schulz, biology, “Pilot Study of Microbial Gut Diversity of Meadow Voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) Born in Captivity as Compared to Those Caught in the Wild; Ryne Scopp, criminal justice, “Target Absent vs. Target Present Police Lineups and the Issue of False Positives; Yuqi She, chemistry. “Quaternary Metal Oxide Investigation for Water Splitting;” Zoe Smith, sociology, “The Effects of Technology on Academic Libraries;” Steven Steinert, psychology, “Emotional Callousness and Emotional Responses to Those in Need: A Direct Replication Study” and “The Impact of Personal Relevance on the Continued Influence Effect;”

Nicolette Stemo, sociology, “Project Success and Education;” Joshua Stuver, sociology, “Reverse Migration of Generation Y and Their Impact on the Segregated City;” Nicole Swenson, psychology, “The Effect of Child Intelligence on Public Perception of Highly Structured Parenting Practices;” Sitha Thor, biology, “Unraveling the Antiviral Properties of Hmong Green Medicine, Tshuaj Ntsuab;” Rebecca Timmins, psychology, “Author Numbers and Genders Over Forty Years in Teaching of Psychology;” Chelsea Vosters, geology. “Photogrammetric Reconstruction of the Late Jurassic Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry of Central Utah;” Caitlin Weihing, psychology, “The Impact of Personal Relevance on the Continued Influence Effect;” Keaton Wigg, biology, “The Connection Between the Presence of Woodland Voles and Recovering Bur Oak Openings;” Andrew Wildish, chemistry “The Synthesis and Characterization of a Novel Catalyst to Recycle Carbon Dioxide;” Jimmy Willing, psychology, “Kinship and Judgments of Helping Behavior;” Brooke Wollner, English, “Peace, Justice, and Understanding in Northern Ireland;” and Pearl Wright, religious studies and anthropology, “Internet Religion: Exploring Community Formation on Wiccan Web Sites.”

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