Understanding Sustainability

Sustainability References



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Steward, Angela. 2013. "Reconfiguring Agrobiodiversity in the Amazon Estuary: Market Integration, the Açaí Trade and Smallholders Management Practices in Amapá, Brazil." Human Ecology 24 July. 

Stewart, Matthew. 2018. "The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy. The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem." The Atlantic June.

  • "… you will often hear, because in the United States everyone has an opportunity to make the leap: Mobility justifies inequality. As a matter of principle, this isn’t true. In the United States, it also turns out not to be true as a factual matter. Contrary to popular myth, economic mobility in the land of opportunity is not high, and it’s going down."
  • "Imagine yourself on the socioeconomic ladder with one end of a rubber band around your ankle and the other around your parents’ rung. The strength of the rubber determines how hard it is for you to escape the rung on which you were born. If your parents are high on the ladder, the band will pull you up should you fall; if they are low, it will drag you down when you start to rise. Economists represent this concept with a number they call 'intergenerational earnings elasticity,' or IGE, which measures how much of a child’s deviation from average income can be accounted for by the parents’ income. An IGE of zero means that there’s no relationship at all between parents’ income and that of their offspring. An IGE of one says that the destiny of a child is to end up right where she came into the world."
  • "According to Miles Corak, an economics professor at the City University of New York, half a century ago IGE in America was less than 0.3. Today, it is about 0.5. In America, the game is half over once you’ve selected your parents. IGE is now higher here than in almost every other developed economy. On this measure of economic mobility, the United States is more like Chile or Argentina than Japan or Germany."

Stibbe, Arran. 2010. The Handbook of Sustainability Literacy: Skills for a Changing World. Green Books, Dartington, U.K. [sample chapters]

Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2002a. Globalization and its Discontents. Norton, New York. [review and summary in wikipedia] [review in New York Review of Books]

Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2006. Making Globalization Work: The Next Steps to Global Justice. Penguin, London.

Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2009. "Capitalist Fools." Vanity Fair January.

Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2010. Freefall: Free Markets and the Sinking of the Global Economy. Norton, New York.  [excerpt]  [review by Paul mason in The New Statesman]  [review by Larry Elliott in the Guardian]   [review by Michiko Kakutani in The New York Times]

Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2012. The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future. Norton, New York. 

Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2015. The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them. Norton, New York. [video lecture at the World Bank] [video discussion with Robert Reich]

Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2017. "Austerity has strangled Britain. Only Labour will consign it to history." The Guardian 7 June. 

  • "Neoliberalism was a creature of the Reagan and Thatcher era. Austerity is its death rattle. Before it does any more damage, Britain needs a plan for growth."

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