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Student Learning Outcomes

 

Social Justice Program

Student Learning Outcomes


Understanding of Concepts Central to the Field of Social Justice


Students graduating with a minor in Social Justice should demonstrate knowledge of the following concepts and issues:

  • the intersection of socially and culturally constructed identities based on race, ethnicity, gender and gender expression, sexuality, class, age, ability, and religion;
  • the categories of discrimination and their effects, including but not limited to racism, sexism, heterosexism, and classism;
  • societal granting of unearned privilege;
  • how local action connects with regional, national, and international conditions;
  • the contexts in which mass movements in societies emerge.

 
Students graduating with an emphasis in Prejudice and Discrimination should demonstrate knowledge of the following additional concepts and issues:

  • the effects of societal granting of unearned privilege and the effects of the lack of such privilege;
  • bias incidents and hate crimes and methods of combating them;
  • how prejudice and discrimination exist at both the micro, mezzo, and macro levels;
  • theories that analyze the dismantling of unearned privilege,  the challenges of being an effective ally, and the advantages of difference.

 

Students graduating with an emphasis in Environment and Social Justice should demonstrate knowledge of the following additional concepts and issues:

  • how racial, gender, and class concerns intersect with environmental issues;
  • how environmental risks are distributed unequally, and across racial, social, and class lines;
  • how the amenities of health—clean air, water, and greenspace—need to be distributed equitably in places of work and residence;
  • the participation of historically marginalized social groups in decision-making about environmental issues.
  • the history and theory of environmental justice activism.

 

Students graduating with an emphasis in Poverty should demonstrate knowledge of the following additional concepts and issues:

  • the varied ways in which poverty is defined, measured, and applied to the formulation of a poverty perspective;
  • the causes of poverty, the historical influences which shaped perceptions of them, and their connection to resources, location, and privilege;
  • the values and ethics which underpin a commitment to assist low income and impoverished persons, groups, organizations, and communities;
  • the particular impact of poverty on oppressed and discriminated-against groups, particularly persons of  color, women, and children;
  • connections between and differences among global issues of poverty and US issues of poverty;
  • theories addressing effective methods to combat poverty and the impact of current poverty policies and programs on the poor.

 

Students graduating with an emphasis in Human Rights should demonstrate knowledge of the following additional concepts and issues:

  • the different theories of human rights and their derivation;
  • the distinction between rights-based discourse and justice-based discourse;
  • comparison of rights-based discourses in a global context;
  • theories of human rights activism.

 

Students graduating with an emphasis in Social Activism should demonstrate knowledge of the following additional concepts and issues:

  • the levels of activism from grass roots to institutional;
  • theories and history of Social Activism;
  • the influence of social activism on large scale social movements;
  • the institutionalization of social movements into law and policy;
  • the role of marginalized groups and social activism

 

Critical Thinking, Writing, and Communication Skills

Students graduating with a minor in Social Justice should be competently able to

  • consider issues from multiple perspectives;
  • identify and evaluate theories and assumptions about social justice;
  • self-reflect about the learning process;
  • critically analyze written and visual texts;
  • apply key Social Justice concepts to activist projects, one’s life, and to non-Social Justice academic coursework;
  • write clear, effective prose;
  • find and evaluate scholarly sources;
  • develop an original, effective argument using evidence based reasoning.

 

Activist Skills

Students graduating with a minor in Social Justice should be competently able to

  • understand the principles of social activism;
  • take action to preserve and promote human rights, human dignity, and human freedom;
  • partner with community members to identify a community problem and to develop a plan of action to address this community problem;
  • make ongoing connections to social justice groups.

 

 

Student Learning Outcomes Established Fall 2009

 

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