Course Offering(s)

Social Justice    101

3 (crs.)

Introduction to Social Justice (XS)(SS)

This is an introductory course focused on social justice, designed to provide an understanding of contemporary issues related to social justice and in identifying and assessing relevant social, economic and behavioral factors which impact people experiencing injustice and oppression. Topics including race, gender, class, disability, gender orientation and environmental injustice, (historic and current) will be explored. Corrective measures which have been used as well as potential corrective measures, will also be explored. Credit cannot be received for both Social Justice 101 and 102.

 

 

Social Justice    102

3 (crs.)

Introduction to Social Justice (XS)(SS)(ES)

This is an introductory course focused on social justice, designed to provide an understanding of contemporary issues related to social justice and in identifying and assessing relevant social, economic and behavioral factors which impact people experiencing injustice and oppression. Topics including race, gender, class, disability, gender orientation and environmental injustice, (historic and current) will be explored. Corrective measures which have been used as well as potential corrective measures, will also be explored. Credit cannot be received for both Social Justice 101 and 102. Course will focus on the Intercultural Knowledge and Competence question and count toward the Ethnic Studies requirement.

 

 

Social Justice    303

3 (crs.)

Women, Politics and Policy - A Global Perspective (SS)(GS)

This is a Comparative Politics course that examines how women's political power varies across countries and around the globe. The course examines topics such as: women's representation in government and political explanations for the variation across countries; women's movements locally and globally and the degree to which they have been able to achieve their objectives; and gender policy that affects women's political and economic empowerment around the globe, including violence against women policy, family law, social policy, and reproductive health policy. The course is designated as a Global Scholar course; and is cross-listed: Political Science 303/Women's Studies 303/Social Justice 303. Students may receive credit for only one of the three cross-listed courses. There are no prerequisites. Political Science 101 or 105 is recommended, but not required.

 

 

Social Justice    304

3 (crs.)

Race and Ethnicity in United States Politics (ES) (SS)

How issues of race and ethnicity have been defined and by whom, and their impact on communities of color; the strategies used by minority groups to become equal participants in the political system; how economic and social conditions might affect political opportunities for minority groups. This course will examine these topics in a historical perspective, with an eye to the interplay between national, state, and local political outcomes. Cross-listed: Political Science 304/Social Justice 304. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

 

 

Social Justice    307

3 (crs.)

Discrimination, Gender, and the Economy

Analysis of the experiences of women and ethnic minorities in the economy, extending the traditional interpretations of economic issues to the unique experiences of these groups. Economic tools will be developed, and then applied to such topics as Comparable Worth, Wage Determination, Occupational Choice and Segregation, Poverty, and the Criminal Justice System. Cross-listed: Economics 307/Women's and Gender Studies/Social Justice 307. Students may receive credit for only one of the three cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Economics 106, 204, 206, 208 or 209. Admitted Business majors; Admitted Econ Bus majors, Econ COLS majors & minors. All other students can take up to 21 credits of 300 and 400 level College of Business department courses, provided they have completed 60 credits with a combined GPA of 2.5.

 

 

Social Justice    313

3 (crs.)

Politics of Genocide

In this course, we examine the sad phenomenon of genocide from two distinct perspectives in our discipline: comparative politics and international relations. In the beginning of the course, we look inside the state to get an idea of the social, economic and political situations that make a state more susceptible to genocide and see if there are indicators common to most genocides. The second part of the course examines several genocides in detail. In the final section of the course, we attempt to figure out why preventing and punishing genocide and other crimes against humanity is so difficult, and evaluate the methods used for prosecution and punishment to date. Cross-listed: Political Science 313/Social Justice 313. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Political Science 101 or 115 or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    317

3 (crs.)

Sociology of Health & Illness

Patterns of health and illness related to social organization and institutions. Issues include the social aspects of physical and mental illness, health related to culture, social structure, class, race, gender and ethnicity, social constructions of the body, changes in patterns of health and illness over time, health organizations and the socio-economic basis of the health care system. Sociology 317/Social Justice 317 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    318

3 (crs.)

Religion and Sexuality

In this class, we will explore how religious practice and sexuality intersect, with a particular focus on the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and queer-identified (LGBTQ) individuals in the modern world. By placing LGBTQ issues at the center of study, we will gain a greater understanding of how religious adherents think about the very notion of sexuality itself. We will also become more sophisticated in our ability to engage with civic questions about religion, families, and rights. Cross-listed: Religious Studies318/Women's and Gender Studies 318/Social Justice 318. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses.

 

 

Social Justice    323

3 (crs.)

Inside-Out Prison Exchange

Focuses on how language shapes our understanding of issues and topics related to incarceration. This course brings together equal numbers of UWO students and incarcerated students at a local correctional institution. Ten joint class sessions are held at the correctional institution. The other three class sessions are held on campus for UWO students and at the correctional facility for incarcerated students. Prerequisites: By Instructor Consent Only. To be considered for a seat in this course, students must complete an interview with the instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    325

3 (crs.)

Collective Behavior and Social Movements (SS)

Collective Behavior provides an analysis of spontaneous, emergent and transitory behavior in relatively unstructured social situations. Social Movements considers formation and dynamics of collective efforts to change or maintain the status quo or to return to some antecedent state. Sociology 325/Social Justice 325 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.  Strongly recommended: Minimum of 6 units (crs.) in Sociology.

 

 

Social Justice    331

3 (crs.)

Social Stratification (SS)

Systems of hierarchical ranking in American and other societies.  Castes, estates, and social classes.  Stratification theory.  Significant American studies of social class structure, power and mobility. Sociology 331/Social Justice 331 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    332

3 (crs.)

Violence: An Examination of the Institutional Foundations

In the United States predominant theories of violence focus on individualistic explanations as the root cause of violence while ignoring the broader and deeper role of social institutions in establishing and perpetuating policies and beliefs in utilizing violence to resolve political, social, and personal conflicts. Course will emphasize how societies can construct and apply less than human identities to individuals, racial or ethnic groups, or other nation states which then allow us to utilize forms of violence against them as "others". Course will include historical and theoretical reviews of slavery, slave law, lynching, death penalty, genocide's, economic violence, environmental violence and gendered violence, all of which disproportionately impact minority populations. Cross-listed Criminal Justice 332/Social Justice 332. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 110 and 270 and at least 12 credits from the following: Public Admin 221 or Crim Jus 212, Crim Jus 218, 244, 281, 288, 343 and 351. Must be a Crim Just major or minor or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    333

3 (crs.)

Illegal Bias in the Criminal Justice System (SS)

An examination of the extent of illegal biases in criminal justice practice. Students will be guided to confront their and others' attitudes shaped by racial, sexual, and sexual orientation biases. The primary goal is to teach a method of open discourse to negotiate these conflicts in an evolving culture. Cross-listed Criminal Justice 333/Social Justice 333. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 110 and 270 and at least 12 credits from the following: Public Admin 221 or Crim Jus 212, Crim Jus 218, 244, 281, 288, 343 and 351. Must be a Crim Just major or minor or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    334

3 (crs.)

Comparative Criminal Justice Policies

This course has been designed to broaden student's awareness of the intertwining historical and contemporary factors underlying differing criminal justice policies through a global perspective of how differing laws, policies, and practices in other nations as well as by some states in the U.S. impact criminal justice systems and broader society so that students can develop an awareness of alternative laws, policies and practices and their outcomes. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 110 and 270 and at least 12 credits from the following: Public Admin 221 or Crim Jus 212, Crim Jus 218, 244, 281, 288, 343 and 351. Must be a Crim Just major or minor or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    347

3 (crs.)

Race, Class, Gender in the Mass Media (ES) (HU)

An introduction to the issues of race, class and gender, including sexual orientation, and their function within motion pictures and the electronic media. The investigation into media representations will reveal the historical, social, and political contexts that shaped and continue to construct these images. Cross-listed: RTF 347/Women's and Gender Studies 347/Social Justice 347. Students may receive credit for only one of the three cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: RTF Students: Cumulative 2.5 GPA and RTF 310: Women's and Gender Studies Students: Cumulative 2.5 GPA and WG STDS 201; Communication Students:  Comm 219; Social Justice Minors: Cumulative GPA 2.5 and Social Justice 101 OR consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    350

3 (crs.)

Ethnographic Methods (SS)

This course centers on ethnographic research methods that are fundamental to Cultural Anthropology. Drawing on a collaborative approach with a community partner, the course stresses empowering research participants, addressing the ethical issues of research, interrogating the positionality of the researcher, and building equitable relationships with research participants. The students will be engaged in research practices such as participant-observation, informal interviews, focus groups, and life histories. The course explores Social Justice issues, especially the intersectionality of various factors, race, class, gender, sexual orientation, age, and more, in the everyday lives of individuals. Prerequisite: Anthro 204 or Social Justice 101 or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    353

3 (crs.)

Convict Criminology

Convict Criminology explores a new way of thinking about crime and corrections. This course examines the emerging field of convict criminology that consists primarily of essays and empirical research conducted and written by convicts, or ex-convicts, on their way to completing or already in possession of a Ph.D., or by enlightened academics who critique existing literature, policies, and practices, thus contributing to a new perspective in criminology, criminal justice, corrections, and community corrections. Cross-listed Criminal Justice 353/Social Justice 353. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 110 and 270 and at least 12 credits from the following: Public Admin 221 or Crim Jus 212, Crim Jus 218, 244, 281, 288, 343 and 351. Must be a Crim Just major or minor or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    355

3 (crs.)

Modern Political Thought (SS)

This course examines the theory of how politics works and how it should work by reading and considering major political thinkers from the Renaissance forward to modernity. These thinkers make claims about humans and societies that cross time and context. Thus we consider how their arguments have been employed and their continued relevance given today's issues and challenges. A number of theorists we meet are among the most influential writers in human history and we assess how our thinking has been affected by them. Alternative visions of the way things should be and explanations of how society works are considered as well. Cross-listed: Political Science 355/Social Justice 355. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

 

 

Social Justice    359

3 (crs.)

Minority Groups (ES) (SS)

Racial and cultural minority groups in the United States, prejudice, types of discrimination and social processes in intergroup relations. Sociology 359/Social Justice 359 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    366

1 - 3 (crs.)

Service Learning Field Study

In this course, students will apply their Social Justice education in service activities in the community related to social justice issues, under the supervision of an individual at the site and a member of the faculty/academic staff. Students will volunteer for a certain number of hours per week depending upon the number of credits they will receive. Students will also write reflective papers that connect their service experiences with relevant readings. Prerequisites: Instructor permission (Note: The general prerequisites for Independent Study/Related Readings are waived for this course).

 

 

Social Justice    368

3 (crs.)

Sociology of Gender (SS)

Analysis of the social construction of gender, which shapes the lives of men and women through the organization of roles or patterns of expectations related to order in society, including sex-typed behavior and self-expression, sexualities, the division of labor, the organization of households, parenting, power and gender-based forms of discrimination. Sociology 368/Women's and Gender Studies 368/Social Justice 368. Students may receive credit for only one of the three cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    377

3 (crs.)

Foundations of American Political Thought (SS)

This course introduces some of the key themes, thinkers, and decision points in American history from the American founding forward to the New Deal. The ideas of prevalent commentators and political practitioners will be featured. Through them we will attempt to discern the values which have shaped and influenced the United States government and American attitudes. Alternative visions of government and paths not taken will also be considered. Those who complete the course will come to appreciate the great variety of American political thought. Readings and discussion will help us to discern what kind of community we have been and how ideas have shaped the American nation, matters of utmost concern for the politically literate citizen.

 

 

Social Justice    378

3 (crs.)

Modern American Political Thought

An exploration of key themes, dilemmas, and decision points in American political history from the New Deal to the present. The ideas of influential thinkers and political practitioners like John Dewey, Milton Friedman, Michael Walzer, Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama are featured, as well as those who present alternative visions of the American political landscape.

 

 

Social Justice    386

3 (crs.)

Politics of Development (SS) (GS)

This course explores the concept of 'development' and critically examines experiences of economic and political development in the developing world in order to understand the political roots of diverse government policies to confront major development issues such as poverty, injustice, corruption, democratization, environmental degradation, and deadly conflict. Cross-listed: Political Science 386/Social Justice 386/Environmental Studies 386. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses. Poli Sci 101 or 115 are recommended.

 

 

Social Justice    392

3 (crs.)

Queer Theory/Queer Lives

As a school of thought and method of analysis, queer theory provides a range of theoretical approaches that challenge fixed, essentialist identities, drawing attention to the incoherencies in the allegedly stable sex/gender system. This course provides a survey of contemporary arguments and critical terms used in the field of queer studies. Emphasis will be on using queer theory as a lens to analyze cultural representations of queerness (in fiction and film), examining the ways in which selected cultural representations frustrate and delegitimize heteronormative knowledges and institutions. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 or more credits AND Women's and Gender Studies 201 or Women's and Gender Studies 205 OR consent of instructor. Cross-listed: Women's and Gender Studies392/Social Justice 392. Student can only receive credit for one of the two cross-listed courses.

 

 

Social Justice    395

3 (crs.)

Special Topics: Optional Content

A course on a topic not normally covered in the curriculum. Each time it is offered, the topic will be announced in the timetable. May be repeated with a different content.

 

 

Social Justice    399

3 (crs.)

Special Topics in Off-Campus Study (OC)

In this course, students will learn what social justice issues are prevalent in another country or region of the United States and what actions are being taken to address them. The off-campus experience will be led by a Social Justice faculty/academic staff member, looking at such issues as poverty, human rights, prejudice and discrimination, and gender activism. Students will interact with community members and be immersed in the culture of that country or region. Student will also write reflective papers that connect their experiences with relevant readings. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

 

 

Social Justice    427

3 (crs.)

Rhetorical Criticism

Ancient and contemporary approaches to rhetorical criticism with emphasis on the description, analysis and evaluation of public messages. Communication 427/Social Justice 427 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Communication 104 and 219; Prerequisite or Corequisite Communication 368; or consent. 427/627

 

 

Social Justice    445

3 (crs.)

African American Civil Rights Rhetoric

This course explores African American civil rights activism through the frameworks of rhetoric and gender. Topics include both the challenges faced by civil rights activists and their contribution to the movement. Integrated throughout the course is an analysis of persuasive documents and events, including speeches, photographs, marches, and slogans. Prerequisites: COMM 214 and COMM 219 or Coreq COMM 368, or WG STDS 201, or SOC JUST 101, or AF AM 100; or instructor consent.

 

 

Social Justice    446

1 - 3 (crs.)

Independent Study

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

 

 

Social Justice    450

3 (crs.)

Rhetoric of the US Women's Rights Movement 1848-1920 (SS)

This course introduces students to primary rhetorical texts of the U.S. women's rights movement, from 1848 to 1920. Emphasis on the analysis of the arguments, appeals, and ideas of the movement. Social Justice 450/Communication 450/Women's and Gender Studies 450. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses. Prerequisites for Majors/Minors:  Communication 104 and 219; and Prerequisite or Corequisite for Communication 368 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite for Women's and Gender Studies Major/Minors: Women's and Gender Studies 201 or consent of instructor.

 

 

Social Justice    451

3 (crs.)

Rhetoric of the U.S. Women's Movement 1920-Present (SS)

This course introduces students to primary rhetorical texts of the U.S. women's rights movement from 1920 to present. Emphasis on the analysis of the arguments, appeals, and ideas of the movement. Students can earn credit for only one of the cross-listed courses: Communication 451/ Women's and Gender Studies 451 /Social Justice 451. Prerequisites for Communication Studies Majors/Minors: Communication 104 and 219; and Prerequisite or Corequisite for Communication Studies Majors/Minors: Communication 368 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite for Women's and Gender Studies Majors/Minors: Women's and Gender Studies 201; or consent of instructor.

 

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