History

Information

Information

Stephen Kercher, Chairperson

Department Office: Sage Hall 3619
Department Telephone: (920) 424-2456

Code 57 or HISTORY

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Faculty

Faculty

Barricelli
Loewenstein
Earns 
Loiacono
Feldman
Mouton 
Frey
Rensing
Kapelusz-Poppi
Rivers
Kercher
Rutz
Kuhl
                                 

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Degrees

Degrees

  • Undergraduate: A major in History can lead to the degree(s): Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Science; Bachelor of Science in Education.

  • Graduate: None

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Summary of Fields of Study

Summary of Fields of Study

1.  The Goals

  • The goals of the Department of History are to ensure that each student majoring in history has been taught to assess historical events and historical writing in a critical fashion and to conduct research appropriate to the undergraduate level. In order to implement and evaluate these goals, the department requires students, with the assistance of faculty advisers, to upload a paper written for History classes to their e-Portfolio.  History majors must meet with their advisers once each semester to ensure satisfactory progress in the major.

2.  The Major(s)

  • The Department offers a single major, History.

3.  The Minor(s)

  • The Department also offers a History minor.

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Admission/Graduation Requirements

Admission/Graduation Requirements

  • To be eligible for graduation, students must meet all requirements for the degree being sought in addition to earning a minimum grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the History major or minor.

  • Those students seeking Wisconsin teacher certification must earn a minimum grade point average of 3.00 in all courses required for their majors and minors in order to meet requirements of the College of Education and Human Services.

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Required Core Courses

Required Core Courses

All History majors and minors must take four Survey Courses.  They may meet this requirement either by taking all four Core Survey Courses or by taking three Core Survey Courses and one from the Topics Survey Courses below.

Core Survey Courses:

  • History 101 Early Civilizations (3 crs.)

  • History 102 Modern Civilizations (3 crs.), or History 103 Honors: Modern Civilizations (3 crs.)

  • History 201 U.S. History to 1877 (3 crs.), or History 204 Honors: U.S. History to 1877 (3 crs.)

  • History 202 Modern U.S. Since 1877 (3 crs.), or History 203 Honors: Modern U.S. History Since 1877 (3 crs.)

Topic Survey Courses:

  • History 105 Topics in the History of Early Civilizations: Optional Content (3 crs.)
  • History 110: Topics in the History of Modern Civilizations: Optional Content (3 crs.)

  • History 205: Topics in the Early History of the United States: Optional Content (3 crs.)

  • History 210 Topics in the Modern History of the United States: Optional Content (3 crs.)

  • History 215 Topics in History: Optional Content (3 crs.)

  • History 216 Honors Topics in History: Optional Content (3 crs.)

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The Major(s), with Emphases and/or Options

The Major(s), with Emphases and/or Options

1. History Major

Ideal for students who wish to acquire the critical thinking and writing skills that will prepare them for a range of challenging careers. Highly recommended in particular for students interested in law, graduate work in History or Library Science or careers in business, historical societies, museums, archives; and public sector careers at the local, state, or national levels.  Education majors who aspire to teach history at the secondary level will also benefit enormously from the major's course of study. 

  • Required Units (crs.): 36 minimum

  • Required Courses: In addition to the Required Survey Courses:

    • History 315 Historical Methods and Writing (3 crs.)

    • One 300-level course in American History

    • One 300-level course in European History

    • One 300-level course in Non-Western History

    • One Research Seminar (History 411, History 412 or History 413)

  • Electives: Sufficient courses from the Department's upper-level offerings in order to meet the minimum requirement.

  • Course Offerings:

    • American History courses: History 311, 326, 339, 341, 345, 357, 358, 361, 362, 363, 364, 366, 367, 368, 369, 385, 386, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398.

    • European History courses: History 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 312, 316, 318, 319, 322, 323, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 340, 350, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374.

    • Non-Western History courses: History 313, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 354, 355, 359, 360, 375, 376, 377, 378, 381, 382, 383, 384.

    • Related courses: History 315, 336, 399, 401, 446, 456, 474.

  • Course Substitutions: Transfer students may substitute history units (crs.) earned at other institutions only after consultation with the chairperson of the History Department.

  • Comment:

    The Department also provides support for a Broad Field Social Science major that is recommended for students who plan to teach high school courses in the Social Science fields and courses such as civics, social problems, American problems, area studies and vital issues in grades 7-12. See the College of Education and Human Services entry for Broad Field Social Science major requirements.

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The Minor(s)

The Minor(s)

1. History

Ideal for students who wish to acquire the critical thinking and writing skills that will prepare them for a range of challenging careers. Recommended in particular for students who wish to add a minor in History to a related major such as Anthropology, Art, Business Administration, Communication, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, Environmental Science, Foreign Languages, Geography, International Studies, Political Science, Religious Studies or Women's and Gender Studies.

  • Required Units (crs.): 24 minimum

  • Required Courses: In addition to the Required Survey Courses (see above):

    • One 300-level course from American History.
    • One 300-level course from European History.
    • One 300-level course from Non-Western History.
  • Electives: Sufficient courses from the Department's offerings to meet the Minimum Requirement

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Course Offering(s)

Course Offering(s)

History    100

3 (crs.)

The Great Migration (SS)(XS)

This Explore course will cover the Great Migration of African Americans who moved from segregated, rural south to urban cities in the North from World War I through 1970. Paying close attention to the interplay of race, class, and gender, we will look at the variety of creative strategies African Americans used re-create communities, navigate cultural difference, and seek a sustainable living. The course will study great black leaders but will also investigate the contributions that countless average men and women made to the black liberation movement. Overall, this course will emphasize the power of resistance and the struggle for African Americans to overcome oppression and infuse their lives with humanity and dignity.

 

 

History    101

3 (crs.)

Early Civilizations (SS)(XS)

Survey of development of civilizations, including beginnings in Mesopotamia and Egypt, through Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. (Fall-Spring)

 

 

History    102

3 (crs.)

Modern Civilizations (SS)(XS)(GC)

Survey of development of Civilizations, including the high Renaissance through Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, and the emergence of nationalism and democracy to recent times. (Fall-Spring)

 

 

History    103

3 (crs.)

Honors: Modern Civilizations (SS)(XS)

Survey of development of Civilization, including the high Renaissance through Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, and the emergence of nationalism and democracy to recent times. Prerequisite: University Honors student. Students cannot earn credit in both an honors course and a non-honors course of the same title. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors Program; prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175.

 

 

History    105

3 (crs.)

Topics in the History of Early Civilizations: Optional Content (XS)(SS)(NW)

Selected topics in the History of Early Civilizations. It may be offered with different content.

 

 

History    110

3 (crs.)

Topics in the History of Modern Civilizations: Optional Content (XS)(SS)

Selected topics in the History of Modern Civilizations. It may be offered with different content.

 

 

History    201

3 (crs.)

United States History to 1877 (SS)(XS)

Survey of United States history from voyages of discovery and early European settlement in North America, through colonial rivalries, struggle of English colonies for independence, expansion and development of young republic, and crisis of Civil War and Reconstruction. (Fall-Spring)

 

 

History    202

3 (crs.)

Modern United States History Since1877 (SS)(XS)

Survey of United States history from 1877; emergence of a modern industrial state, expansion abroad, First and Second World Wars, and role as a great power. (Fall-Spring)

 

 

History    203

3 (crs.)

Honors: Modern United States History Since 1877 (SS)

Survey of United States history from 1877; emergence of a modern industrial state, expansion abroad, First and Second World Wars, and role as a great power. Prerequisite: University Honors student. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors Program; prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175. (Fall-Spring)

 

 

History    204

3 (crs.)

Honors: Early United States History to 1877 (SS)(XS)

Early United States history will be examined within the framework of the new social history. Primary sources will be used to eliminate the relationship between myth and reality, to analyze national values and their origins, and to examine the struggle for national unity in a culturally diverse society. Students cannot earn credit in both an honors course and a non-honors course of the same title. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors Program; prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175.

 

 

History    205

3 (crs.)

Topics in the Early History of the United States: Optional Content (SS)(XS)

Selected topics in the Early History of the United States designed specifically for the Quest courses in the University Studies Program. This course also fulfills requirements for the major and minor. It may be offered with different content.

 

 

History    210

3 (crs.)

Topics in the Modern History of the United States: Optional Content (XS)(SS)

Selected topics in the Modern History of the United States. It may be offered with different content.

 

 

History    215

3 (crs.)

Topics in History Optional Content (SS)(XS)

Selected topics in History. It may be offered with different content.

 

 

History    216

3 (crs.)

Honors: Topics in History, Optional Content (XS) (SS)

An optional content History Explore course designed for Honors students.

 

 

History    301

3 (crs.)

America in the Great Depression (SS)

This course examines American life, society, culture, politics, and economics during the tumultuous years of the Great Depression (1929-1941). These topics will be explored through a variety of secondary texts and primary documents (literature, film, radio, music, photography, and historical texts). Topics include worldwide economic collapse, the expansion of federal authority during the Roosevelt Administration, the experiments in public policy known as the New Deal, political realignment, the growing power of the labor movement, nationalization of culture and how the Great Depression affected different people according to the categories of race, class, and gender. Finally, we will consider the important legacy of the Depression and New Deal and what their impact is on contemporary America. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    302

3 (crs.)

Ancient Greece (SS)

Greek civilization from the Homeric Age to Alexander. Greek democracy's triumphs and failures. Colonization of the Mediterranean, conflicts with Persia and between Greek city-states. The mind and expression of the Hellenic Age and its influence on the modern world. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    303

3 (crs.)

Roman History (SS)

Rome from earliest times to end of the Western Roman Empire.  Political, social, economic, and intellectual aspects of the rise and fall of Roman civilization, with attention to the influences of the Etruscans, Greeks, and Carthaginians, as well as the influence of Rome on Western Culture.  Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    304

3 (crs.)

Early Middle Ages, 300-1050 (SS)

An introduction to the history and culture of Europe from about 300-1050. Among the topics of discussion will be late antique society, the influence of the barbarians, the importance of the Church, the Byzantine Empire and Islamic caliphates, the status of women, and the role of law and religion in medieval society. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    305

3 (crs.)

The Later Middle Ages, 1050-1450 (SS)

A survey of the principal political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual events of Western Europe and its influential neighbors, from the mid-eleventh century to about 1450. Among the topics of discussion will be the birth of towns and universities, the emergence of the national monarchies, the course and significance of the Investiture Controversy, religious reform throughout the time period, and the economic and environmental crises of the fourteenth century. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    306

3 (crs.)

The Crusades (SS)(GS)

In 1095, Pope Urban II conceived a new way for devout Christians in Europe to combine the religious benefits of pilgrimage with the attractions of medieval warfare: the result was a series of expeditions to Jerusalem and the Levant known today as the First Crusade. This course will examine the resulting crusading movement from the eleventh to the beginning of the sixteenth century, noting how the idea of a "crusade" changed from an expedition to the Holy Land to a war aimed at the enemies of Christendom both within and outside its borders. The course will rely heavily on the examination and analysis of key episodes of the Crusades from the perspectives of European (Latin) Christians, Orthodox (Greek) Christians, Muslims (Sunni and Shiite) and European Jews. Particular attention will be devoted to the background and genesis of the First Crusade, to the reactions of Muslims to the crusaders and to the formation of the Crusader States, to the appeal of crusading ideology to European knights, and to the effects of the crusading movement on European social life, politics, and theology. Because the foundations of current relations between Christians, Muslims and Jews were formed during this period, it is a particularly relevant field of study for the twenty first century. Two goals of the class will be to help students appreciate the different religious and cultural beliefs that influenced the actions of those involved in the Crusades and to enable students to understand how actions within Europe affected the Byzantine Empire and the Levant and vice versa. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    308

3 (crs.)

Renaissance Europe (SS)

Cultural origins and achievements of the Renaissance. Political, economic and social conditions of Italy and the North, Art and Literature, origin of modern states, European expansion overseas, and Renaissance contributions to western culture. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    309

3 (crs.)

The Viking Age (GS)

Who were the people we call "Vikings" and how did they live? How does our modern memory of the Vikings correspond to what scholars have been able to reconstruct of their family life, economy, political organizations, art, and poetry? This class will attempt to answer these questions and others through the study and discussion of written records, archaeological findings, and the works of modern historians. the course will concentrate on a "long" Viking Age, from the eighth through the early thirteenth centuries, in order to incorporate Icelandic sources and Scandinavian expansion west to the North Atlantic islands of the Faroes, Shetland, Orkney, Iceland, Greenland and, eventually, to North America. We will begin with Scandinavian society in the Early Middle Ages and then explore the reasons for Scandinavian expansion, the boats that allowed Vikings to travel, their raids along the coasts of Britain, Ireland, and the Frankish Kingdoms, the establishment of new settlements, and the religious beliefs of the Norse along with their conversions to Christianity. We will take a global approach, examining how the Vikings interacted with the different cultures they encountered across the world, how Viking raiding and trading affected other kingdoms and in turn how Scandinavian society, and indeed Europe as a whole, was affected by their interactions with these new cultures. Prerequisite: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    310

3 (crs.)

Reformation Europe (SS)

An introduction to the political, religious, social and economic, and cultural history of Europe from c.1450 to c.1650. Special emphasis will be given to the intellectual and religious trends of the period and their relation to late medieval ideas, as well as to the topics of the intersection of religions and political expediency, the spread of printing, and role of women and the family in sixteenth and seventeenth-century Europe. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    311

3 - 9 (crs.)

Special Topic in American History: Optional Content (SS)

Selected topics in American History.  This course fulfills the requirements for the major and minor. It may be offered with different content.  With a different subtitle, it may be taken more than once with the signature of the Department Chair. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    312

3 - 9 (crs.)

Special Topics in European History:  Optional Content (SS)

Selected topics in European history. This course fulfills the requirements for the major and minor. It may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken more than once with the signature of the Department Chair. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    313

3 - 9 (crs.)

Special Topics in Non-Western History: Optional Content (SS)(NW)

Selected topics in Non-western history. This course fulfills the requirements for the major and minor. It may be offered with different content.  With a different subtitle, it may be taken more than once with the signature of the Department Chair. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    315

3 (crs.)

Historical Methods and Writing (SS)

This course gives students training in the skills required to be a successful history major, both in college and after college. It is intended for students who have declared a history major and have begun completing the introductory requirements. It must be completed before students take their senior seminar. At the end of the course students will be familiar with how to engage historical sources, both primary and secondary. Students will know how to locate, read, analyze, and write about all kinds of sources. Students will also have rigorous training and practice in various kinds of historical writing. Prerequisites: At least 3 credits and preferably not more than 12 credits of history, or department consent.

 

 

History    316

3 (crs.)

Romanticism and Revolution in Europe (SS)

Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the Franco-Prussian War.  Reaction, revolution, social classes, intellectual ferment, and development of ideologies.  Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    318

3 (crs.)

Modernism and Nationalism in Europe (SS)

European history from end of the Franco-Prussian War through World War I. Political, economic and cultural developments, social and intellectual history, the operation of forces of nationalism and democracy and causes of the Great War. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    319

3 (crs.)

Europe Since 1914 (SS)

History of Europe since World War I. Topics include fascism, communism, nazism, World War I and World War II; post-war efforts at European unity; the East-West conflict. Course will examine political, economic and social developments. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    322

3 (crs.)

Early Modern Europe (SS)

An examination of the primary social, cultural, intellectual, and political developments in 17th and early 18th century Europe. Beginning with European religious division and conflict, it will explore popular and intellectual culture, from the witchcraze to the scientific revolution; political theory to the practice of the state centralization; global encounter and colonization, and cultural expression in music and the arts. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    323

3 (crs.)

Old Regime, French Revolution and Napoleon, 1763-1815 (SS)

Examines the collapse of the traditional monarchy and society in France, the revolutionary changes of 1789-99, and the domestic and international policies of Napoleon Bonparte from 1799-1815. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    326

3 (crs.)

American Environmental History (SS)

A survey of the major topics and issues in North American environmental history from the early native American experience through the twentieth century. Cross-listed: History 326/Environmental Studies 326. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    327

3 (crs.)

The History of American Cities (SS)

This course examines the development of American urban centers from the colonial era to the present, focusing especially on the formation and evolution of the physical urban environment, urban political economy, structures of race, class and gender, growth and decline, suburbanization, and responses to the urban crisis. Throughout the course we will not only analyze urban development but will connect it to the broader patterns of American social, cultural, political, and economic history. In doing so, we will consider many American cities to understand their historical significance in regional, national and international contexts. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    328

3 (crs.)

History of Sexuality in the United States (SS)

This course will explore the complicated and fascinating history of sexuality in America, from the colonial era to the present. As such, it deals with many contemporary issues like contraception, censorship, prostitution LGBT rights, marriage, sex education, sexual assault, and sexually transmitted diseases. Students can only receive credit for one the two cross-listed classes. History328/Women's and Gender Studies 328. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    329

3 (crs.)

Culture and Society in Eighteenth-Century Europe (SS)

This course examines the nature and interaction of elite culture and popular culture during the age of Enlightenment; how new forms of public discourse reflected and reformed a hierarchical social structure based on tradition, status and wealth. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    330

3 (crs.)

Imperial Germany (SS)

The movement for unification in Germany, focusing on the role of Prussia in creating the Second German Empire; domestic developments from 1871 to 1918, foreign affairs as they led to the First World War, and a description of the military struggles of the war that ended in Germany's defeat and the collapse of the empire. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    331

3 (crs.)

Germany from World War I to the Present (SS)

A survey of German History from the First World War to the present. The course will examine the First and Second World Wars, The Weimar Republic, National Socialism, The Holocaust, inflation and depression. It will investigate the division of Germany after 1945 and how Socialism and Democracy influenced society, culture and politics on the two sides of the Berlin Wall. It will end with a study of the issues surrounding Reunification. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    332

3 (crs.)

Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, 1919-1945 (SS)

The rise of the Nazi Party and Adolf Hitler's role in the years from 1919 to 1932; the development and decline of the Third Reich from 1933 to 1945, analyzing politico-economic and socio-cultural policies of coordination; the events that triggered World War II; the military struggles that characterized the unfolding of the conflict.  Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    333

3 (crs.)

The Holocaust (SS)

The way in which the Nazi totalitarian dictatorship was able to pervert morality and justice in Germany and elsewhere in order to exterminate European Jews and other racial minorities in concentration camps like Auschwitz, Treblinka, and Maidanek. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    334

3 (crs.)

Women in Modern European History (SS)(XS)

An examination of the role of women in modern European History from the Enlightenment to the Present. Particular attention will be paid to how women's work, political participation, and family roles have influenced and have been influenced by industrialization, modernization, and suffrage as well as political movements like democracy, communism, and fascism. Cross-listed: Women's and Gender Studies 334/History 334. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    335

3 (crs.)

Nuclear America (SS)

In this research and reading seminar, students will explore the many and complicated ways that Americans have interacted with nuclear energy by examining topics such as foreign policy and the arms race, civil defense planning, nuclear energy, the peace movement, the environmental movement, climate change, and many more. In confronting nuclear energy, Americans thought and reflected on much more than just the power of the atom. They wrestled with elemental questions such as the human relationship to nature, the nature of progress, the obligations of citizenship, and the balance between national security and democracy. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    336

1 - 6 (crs.)

History Study Tour (SS)

Selected Topics in History for US based study tours and/or Study Abroad programs. This course fulfills the requirement for the major and minor. It may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken more than once with Department consent. Prerequisite: Instructor Consent

 

 

History    339

3 (crs.)

Public History (SS)

Examines the practice of history outside of academia and explores the connections between American history, popular memory, landscapes, and community identity; examines the historic origins and contemporary implications of a "sense of place." Cross-Listed: History 339/Environmental Studies 339. Students may receive credit for only one of these two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    340

3 (crs.)

The Scientific Revolution, 1500-1800 (SS)

Surveys the development of European early modern science and technology in context and in relation to their broad cultural effects. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    341

3 (crs.)

History of Wisconsin (SS)

Cultural, economic, political, and social history of Wisconsin. Meets cooperative requirement for education students. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    343

3 (crs.)

Religion in Modern Europe (SS)

An introduction to the history of religion and religious thought in Europe from the era of the Enlightenment to the present day. Explore a variety of topics, including: religion in the age of revolutions, evangelicalism and missions, 19C debates on religion and science, anti-Semitism, secularization, religion and violence in the 20C, and the impact of multi-culturalism on religious life in contemporary Europe through readings, lectures, and discussion. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    344

3 (crs.)

Postwar Europe 1945 to the Present (SS)

This course will introduce students to the history of Europe since the end of the Second World War. Students will explore Cold War Europe through the study of a variety of topics including Denazification and Reconstruction, Communism and Democracy, the 1968 Uprisings, Immigration, and People's Activism in the name of peace, feminism, and environmental sustainability. The course will use different kinds of sources (political/legal documents, fiction, memoirs and secondary sources) to help students understand how men and women experienced this era in the east and west, in cities and rural areas. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    345

3 (crs.)

History of American Wilderness (SS)

Examines the history of changing American ideas about wilderness, the history of nature protection in the United States; explores current debates over the proper methods of wilderness preservation. Cross-Listed: History 345/Environmental Studies 345. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    346

3 (crs.)

Women & Gender Relations in Latin American History (SS)(NW)

This course will explore the role of women and the construction of gender relations in Latin America since Pre-Hispanic times to the Twentieth Century. It will start with the analysis of these topics among the Aztec and Maya and will next focus on the way in which gender relations contributed to the construction of the colonial world. The course will next look at the position that women played in the nineteenth century and the transformations that affected gender relations towards the end of the century, when new middle-class values began pervading Latin American society. The course will finally examine the way in which the modernization process of the first half of the twentieth century brought women into the public sphere as workers, political leaders, and intellectuals. Cross-listed: History 346/Women's and Gender Studies 346. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    347

3 (crs.)

Mexico: From Pre-Hispanic Times to the Twentieth Century (SS)(NW)

This course examines Mexican Indigenous cultures, the influence of colonial times, the conflicts between Liberals and Conservatives in the nineteenth-century, the Mexican Revolution of 1910, and the reconstruction of the Mexican state in the aftermath of this conflict. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    348

3 (crs.)

Ancient and Medieval India (SS)

This course surveys the history and historiography of Ancient and Medieval India (South Asia), from the Neolithic period to the late 15th century CE. Through primary and secondary source readings, lectures, videos, and discussions, students will gain a broad understanding of the main themes of ancient and medieval Indian history and culture. Students also will study key selections from the most important works of the corpus of Indic literature, touching on politics, socio-economic development, gender, discrimination, philosophy, religion, the arts, and other topics. Throughout, the course will examine the gradual synthesis of ethnicities, regional dimensional Indian civilization. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    349

3 (crs.)

Modern India (SS)

Through lecture and discussion, the student is introduced to major events and themes in the modern history of the Indian Subcontinent, from the rise of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century to the colonial period of the late 18th and 19th centuries, the decades of the freedom struggle in the early 20th century, and the rapid political and socio-economic changes that have occurred since partition and independence in 1947. The course emphasizes, in addition to important political changes, aspects of cultural and economic history. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    350

3 (crs.)

Modern East Europe (SS)

History of East-Central Europe, concentrating on Poland, the Czech lands, Slovakia and Hungary, from circa 1700 to the present. Topics include the emergence of nationalism and nationalism movements, relations with cultures to the west and east, 'modernization', war and the Holocaust, the Communist era, the fall of Communism and cultural, economic, political, religious and social developments within each area. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    351

3 (crs.)

Gender in Indian History (SS)(NW)

This course examines gender in the context of Indian Civilization from prehistory to the present. Instead of focusing on political and economic history, the concern of this course is the development of ideas about sexual identity and normative values regarding the roles of men and women in society. While the majority of the course material will revolve around the history of women, with an emphasis on relationships and family life in Hindu and Muslim Indian culture, some attention will be given to the subject of masculinity and to non-normative traditions. Cross-listed: History 351/Women's and Gender Studies 351. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    352

3 (crs.)

Revolutions and Popular Revolts in Latin America (GS)(SS)

How do we understand and explain revolutions such as the Cuban Revolution? What are the historical origins of contemporary revolutionary regimes such as those in Venezuela or Bolivia? This course will seek to answer these and other relevant questions by looking at revolutions, revolts and popular rebellions in the Western Hemisphere. In many occasions the United States played an important role in how the events unfolded. Studying revolution and popular revolts in Latin America contributes. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    354

3 (crs.)

Latin American Environmental History (SS)

This class discusses a series of topics relevant to the environmental history of Latin America. Among these topics are the early population of the Americas and the development t of sedentary habits. It also covers an analysis of the pre-Hispanic civilizations and their interaction with their landscape. The course also includes an analysis of the effects of the Spanish conquest and of the challenges created by the construction of the Atlantic Empires in early modern times. Health issues will be at the course of this analysis, in particular the yellow fever epidemics that ravaged the Caribbean basin between 1790 and the early twentieth-century. Cross-listed: Environmental Studies 354/History 354, students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    355

3 (crs.)

Global Environmental History (SS)(NW)

Examines the way that the natural environment intersects with major themes in world history, including industrialization, colonialism, frontiers, and war. Investigates the environmental context and consequences of these and other subjects with the understanding that the natural world can shape human history and that the events of human history have played and continue to play, key roles in shaping the environment. Cross-listed History 355/Environmental Studies 355. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    356

3 (crs.)

World War II: Global Warfare 1931-1945 (GS) (SS)

This class will study the causes and course of World War II, the largest and most "total" conflict in human history. Instead of focusing on the period from 1939 to 1945, it examines "the long Second World War" which began with the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in September 1931. In addition to tracing the course of strategy and military operations, this course will also examine how the war's social and economic ramifications impacted the lives of almost the entire global population, including the citizens of neutral nations and inhabitants of vast regions that were never directly touched by the fighting. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    357

3 (crs.)

The United States 1919-1945: Modernity, Crisis, and War (SS)

An examination of one of the most turbulent and pivotal periods in modern United States history. This period began with a Red Scare and the retrenchment of Progressivism; continued with the economic boom, rise of modernity, and the cultural clashes of the paradoxical 1920's; proceeded with the onset of the Great Depression, the political ferment of the Thirties and the formation of the New Deal; and ended with America's participation in World War II. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    358

3 (crs.)

Asian American History (ES) (SS)

A history of Asian Americans in the United States from the mid-19th century to the present. Peoples from China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, India and Southeast Asia will be examined. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    359

3 (crs.)

Africa: 1800 - Present (SS)(NW)

This course surveys modern African history, examining the development of the continent's social, political and economic structures as well as its participation in the process of globalization. The course focuses primarily upon topics of African history from nineteenth century through the post-colonial period, including: indigenous social and political systems, the slave trade, imperialism, and decolonization. This course includes a special emphasis on issues of sustainability and environmental history. It meets the Global Scholar criteria. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    360

3 (crs.)

South Africa: 1652 - Present (SS)(NW)

A survey of southern Africa from the onset of European settlement to the present. Topics include the diversity of African societies and cultures, the impact of European settlement, the dynamics of the relationships between Dutch and British settlers, the growth of South Africa's modern economy, the development of policies of racial segregation and the institution of the Apartheid State, the history of African resistance, and the transformation of South Africa into a multi-racial democracy. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    361

3 (crs.)

Colonial North America (SS)

A history of North America from the period of contact between indigenous Americans, Europeans, and Africans in the sixteenth century to the independence movement in British North America in the late eighteenth century. Topics will include peace and war between "Indians" and Europeans, the rise of race and slavery, and everyday life in places such as Puritan Massachusetts, the Carolina plantations, French Canada, Spanish New Mexico, and Iroquoia. Particular attention will be paid to the British colonies on the eastern seaboard.  Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    362

3 (crs.)

The American Revolution, 1760-1786 (SS)

An examination of the revolutionary era in America. It traces the origins of the imperial crisis, the campaigns of the war of independence, loyalism, the citizen army, the British perspective on events, the foundations of the Republic and the social impact of the American Revolution. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    363

3 (crs.)

American Indian History (SS)(ES)

An introduction to the complex past of American Indians in what is now the continental United States, from their origins to the present, with an emphasis on Wisconsin's Indian nations. Includes both ethnohistory, tracing change and continuity in the native cultures, and intercultural political history, seeking to understand the "Indian side(s) of encounters with various colonizers and levels of UW government. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    364

3 (crs.)

Early American Republic, 1787-1828 (SS)

A history of the United States from the framing of the Constitution to the election of Andrew Jackson as President. This is the colorful period of the creation of the U.S. Constitution, the rise of the Federalist and Jeffersonian Republican parties, the fiercely-fought election of 1800, factories, new gender roles for women and men, the growth of democracy, the War of 1812, a "second great awakening" in religious faith, the strengthening and weakening of slavery and, in sum, the foundation of many new American institutions and practices.  Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    366

3 (crs.)

The Rise of American Democracy, 1828-1854 (SS)

This course traces the rise of democracy and the Second Party System in the United States during the early and middle nineteenth century. It will explore how and why American society and government evolved in ways that fostered mass participation in the political process. Topics covered during this critical period of United States history will include the development of America's market economy; the presidencies of Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler and James Polk; the rise of the popular press; the 1840s campaign for women's rights; conflict between the federal government and American Indians; the California Gold Rush; the continuing influence of the "second great awakening"; the Transcendentalist movement; Southern slavery and the abolitionist movement. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    367

3 (crs.)

The Civil War Era (SS)

The process of division, war, and reunion between the years 1845 and 1877. The social and economic structure of the United States in the antebellum era, evolution of the political crisis, Union and Confederate home fronts, narrative of battles, Black experience during war and peace, and politics of reunion.   Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    368

3 (crs.)

The Gilded Age and Progressive Era United States (SS)

During the Gilded age, innovations in industry and transportation created great wealth and attracted millions of immigrants to growing cities. This burst of growth also created problems such as environmental devastation, urban slums, labor violence, political corruption, and racial/ethnic tensions. The people behind the Progressive movement (including many well-known Progressive reformers and politicians in Wisconsin) attempted to find solutions to these problems by studying new fields of knowledge and experimenting with new forms of government. Chronologically covers the end of the Civil War through the end of World War I. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    369

3 (crs.)

America Since World War II (SS)

An examination of the cultural, intellectual, political, economic and social trends that developed in the United States between American entry into the Second World War and the present. Includes the origins of the Cold War, McCarthyism, the civil rights movement; the counterculture and protest movements of the 1960s, modern feminism, the end of the Cold War, conservative resurgence.   Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    370

3 (crs.)

Imperial Russia (SS)

This course will examine the social, cultural, political and economic development of Russia from the medieval era through 1917. Topics to be discussed include the rise and fall of the Kievan state, the creation of Muscovite absolutism, tensions generated by Peter the great's reforms, and the rise of the revolutionary movement that culminated in the Russian Revolutions of 1917. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    371

3 (crs.)

Modern Russia (SS)

This course will examine the social, political and economic development of Russia from 1917 to the present. Topics to be discussed include Linin and the Bolshevik seizure of power, Stalin and his attempt to construct a socialist state, the foreign and domestic policies of Khrushchev, Bbrezhnev, and Gorbachev. The course will conclude with an examination of the current situation and the presidency of Vladimir Putin. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    372

3 (crs.)

Medieval Britain to 1485 (SS)

An examination of the peoples inhabiting Britain from pre-history to 1485. Particular attention will be given to the withdrawal of Britain from the Roman Empire, the emergence of centralized government during both the Anglo-Saxon and high medieval periods, social and intellectual developments after the Norman Conquest, the rise of Parliament, and English involvement in France. The emphasis of the course will be on developments in England, although aspects of Irish, Welsh, and Scottish history will also be included. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    373

3 (crs.)

Early Modern Britain 1485-1714 (SS)

A survey of the social, political, religious and economic history of the British Isles from 1485 through 1714. Topics include: the formation of Tudor state, the Protestant Reformation, the conquest of Ireland and the origins of the British Empire, the union of the kingdoms of England and Scotland under the Stuart dynasty, the English Civil War and the execution of Charles I, the Interregnum, the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and the Glorious Revolution of 1689. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    374

3 (crs.)

Modern Britain 1714-Present (SS)

A survey of the political, social and cultural changes in Britain from 1714 to the present. Recurring themes will include questions of political and constitutional reform, issues of class and status in British society, the development of the modern industrial economy, the significance of religious and other cultural influences, the formation of a "British" identity, the expansion of a world-wide British empire, and Britain's changing status as a commercial and world power in the 20th and 21st Centuries. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    375

3 (crs.)

Traditional Japan (NW) (SS)

Japanese civilization from its origin to 1800. Early native developments, borrowing from China, the rise of the samurai and the development of shogunal governments through the mid-Edo period.  Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    376

3 (crs.)

Modern Japan (NW) (SS)

Rise of modern Japan against the background of 19th-century developments. The arrival of the West, Meiji restoration, industrialization, the rise of militarism, World War II, the American occupation, and Japan's emergence as a post-industrial economic power. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    377

3 (crs.)

Traditional China (NW) (SS)

Chinese civilization from its origin to 1800. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    378

3 (crs.)

Modern China (NW) (SS)

Chinese civilization from its origin to 1800. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    381

3 (crs.)

Latin America to 1825 (NW) (SS)

Colonial foundations based on fusion of Indian, Spanish, Portuguese, African and French cultures in Latin America; Colonial control by Spain, Portugal, and France; revolts for independence and search for national maturity. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    382

3 (crs.)

Modern Latin America (NW) (SS)

Political evolution of the twenty Latin American states; 19th century revolutions and economic invasions by industrial countries; effects of the world wars.  Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    383

3 (crs.)

Traditional Middle East, 330-1789 (SS)(NW)

History and institutions of the Middle East from 330 to 1789. The rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire, Muhammad and the emergence of Islam; the establishment of the Turkish and Persian empires. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    384

3 (crs.)

Modern Middle East 1789-1979 (SS)(NW)

The decline and fall of the Turkish and Persian empires, the imperial interests of the Great Powers; the advent of nationalism and Zionism. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    385

3 (crs.)

African American History (ES) (SS)

The Black experience from African origin to the present; the slave experience; African-American culture; the civil rights movement. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 100-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    386

3 (crs.)

Women in the United States (SS)

The status, work, role, and leadership activities of white, Native American and African American women in United States history. Exceptional women, and the feminist, suffrage, and liberation movements examined within the perspective of the life and attitudes of the mass of women in the United States.  Cross-listed: History 386/Women's and Gender Studies 386. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    387

3 (crs.)

Conversations in United States History (SS)

Conversations in American History afford History instructors and students to engage in a small-scale, colloquium-style class that privileges intensive readings and discussion. The topic for each semester-long "conversation" will vary according to the interests and expertise of the instructor offering the course. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    389

3 (crs.)

Conversations in European History (SS)

Conversations in European History afford History instructors and students to engage in a small-scale, colloquium-style class that privileges intensive readings and discussion. The topic for each semester-long "conversation" will vary according to the interests and expertise of the instructor offering the course. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and 100-level history course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    391

3 (crs.)

War, the American Military & U.S. Foreign Relations, 1919-Present (SS)

American military history from the end of World War I through the present. Among the critical objectives of this course are the following: to provide an evolutionary overview of American military doctrine, both in its strategic and tactical dimensions; to provide an understanding of warfare as an extension of diplomatic and national policy; and to come to understand the complex interactions between U.S. military policy and American society. Topics addressed will include World War II, the rise of the Cold War national security state and military industrial complex, the Vietnam War, the gulf Wars and the continuing War on Terrorism. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    392

3 (crs.)

Social and Intellectual History of United States 1607-1860 (SS)

Thought and culture from Colonial period to the Civil War. Roles of religion, science, the arts, education, and the development of social values and mores in the United States. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    393

3 (crs.)

Modern United States Cultural and Intellectual History (SS)

American thought and culture since the late nineteenth century; roles of science, religion, the arts, and education in the development of social values and cultural perceptions with particular attention given to the effects of urbanization and industrialization.  Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    394

3 (crs.)

Workers and work in America 1820 - present (SS)

How did working people help build the United States? How have their composition, character, and culture changed over time? This course will consider how history helps us to answer such questions. In answering these questions we will explore such issues as race, ethnicity, and gender as well as the history of labor and political movements. Novels, documents and films will also be utilized to develop a better understanding of the culture of working people and how it has changed from the 1820s to the present. Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    395

3 (crs.)

War, the American Military & U.S. Foreign Relations, 1600-1918 (SS)

American military history from its foundations in the colonial era through the conclusion of World War I. Among the critical objectives of this course are the following: to provide an evolutionary over view of the American military doctrine, both in its strategic and tactical dimensions; to provide an understanding of warfare as an extension of diplomatic and national policy; and to come to understand the interaction between how American society shapes our military policy and how the experience of war impacts American society.  Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor. Students cannot earn credit in both an honors course and a non-honors course of the same title.

 

 

History    396

3 (crs.)

America in the Sixties (SS)

An examination of American culture, politics, and society during the 1960's.  President John Kennedy's New Frontier; the war in Vietnam; the civil rights, feminist and antiwar movements; the New Left and counterculture; Pop Art, folk music and acid rock; the rise of conservatism.  Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    397

3 (crs.)

American Foreign Relations to 1917 (SS)

The history of American foreign relations from the colonial era until U.S. entry into World War I; examines the cultural, intellectual, political, economic and social forces that influenced the development of American foreign policy before U.S. emergence as a twentieth-century 'superpower.'  Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    398

3 (crs.)

American Foreign Relations from 1917 to the Present (SS)

The history of American foreign relations from U.S. entry into World War I until the present; examines the cultural, intellectual, political, economic and social forces that influenced the development of American foreign policy during and after U.S. emergence as an international 'superpower.'  Prerequisites: Junior standing or any 200-level History course or consent of instructor.

 

 

History    399

1 - 6 (crs.)

Internship in History (SS)

An individually arranged internship that enables students to gain practical experience as public historians in a variety of settings.  The internship is intended for advanced students with extensive course work relating to History.  Students will submit papers based upon their experiences and be evaluated by their supervisors. With consent of the department chair, students may complete more than one internship. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing with a major in history and two upper-division history classes.

 

 

History    401

3 (crs.)

Historiography and Historical Methods (SS)

An analysis of the conceptual frameworks employed by historians and the methods which historians have used to arrive at conclusions. Nature of history, evolution of the discipline of history, analysis of documents, process of drawing conclusions from evidence, use of different methodologies, and practical experience of writing history. Prerequisite: one 300-level history course.

 

 

History    411

3 (crs.)

American History Seminar (SS)

An in-depth analysis of a given topic in American history. The topic will be announced each time course is offered. Students will be exposed to a variety of different materials including primary sources. A major paper will be required. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status with a Major in history and History 315 (for majors who began their studies at UW Oshkosh during or after the Fall 2012 semester) and department consent.

 

 

History    412

3 (crs.)

European History Seminar (SS)

An in-depth analysis of a given topic in European history. The topic will be announced each time course is offered. Students will be exposed to a variety of different materials including primary sources.  A major paper will be required. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status with a Major in history and History 315 (for majors who began their studies at UW Oshkosh during or after the Fall 2012 semester) and department consent.

 

 

History    413

3 (crs.)

Non-Western History Seminar (SS)

An in-depth analysis of a given topic in non-Western history. The topic will be announced each time course is offered. Students will be exposed to a variety of different materials including primary sources. A major paper will be required.  Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status with a Major in history and History 315 (for majors who began their studies at UW Oshkosh during or after the Fall 2012 semester) and department consent.

 

 

History    446

1 - 3 (crs.)

Independent Study (SS)

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.  Major in history.

 

 

History    456

1 - 3 (crs.)

Related Readings (SS)

See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

 

 

History    474

1 - 6 (crs.)

Honors: Thesis (SS)

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be 'Honors Thesis.' Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Prerequisite: The Honors College and junior standing. Maximum of 6 units (crs.).




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