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Course Offering(s)

Physical Science


Physical Science   101                                           1-4 (crs.)

Workshop Physical Science (NS)(XL)
A hands-on course covering basic concepts in physical science through active engagement with guided computer-based laboratories, student-directed projects, interactive demonstrations, and class discussions. Emphasis on the nature and limits of science. For elementary education majors and non-science majors. (3+2)

 

Physics/Astronomy


Physics/Astronomy   103                                           4 (crs.)

The Solar System (NS)(XL)

The astronomer's understanding of the earth, moon and planets. Explores the basic nature of science and the scientific method. Intended for non-science majors and science majors having an interest in astronomy. Prerequisite: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam (3+2) (Fall)

 

Physics/Astronomy   104                                           4 (crs.)

Stars, Galaxies and the Universe (NS)(XL)

Universe beyond the solar system. Methods of science applied to classification of stars, galaxies, nebulae, and exotic objects such as pulsars, quasars, and black holes. Intended for non-science majors and science majors having an interest in astronomy. May be taken to satisfy the general education lab science requirement. Prerequisites: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam. (3+2) (Spring)

 

Physics/Astronomy   105                                           4 (crs.)

Basic Acoustics of Music (NS)

A course designed in cooperation with the music department principally for music majors interested in the acoustical foundation of this subject. Emphasis throughout is on the needs and interests of the music student. May not be counted toward a Physics major or minor. (3+2)

 

Physics/Astronomy   106                                           3 (crs.)

Introduction to Topics in Physics

A general introduction to selected topics in physics. A historical perspective of fundamental ideas of motion will be examined. Focus will be on the development of problem-solving skills in such areas as unit analysis; making approximations; and using trigonometry, exponential functions, logarithms, vectors, derivatives, integrals, and graphs. A blend of history, selected topics, direct experiences, problem-solving practice and applying math skills is used to enhance preparation for success in physics courses. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

 

Physics/Astronomy   107                                           1-5 (crs.)

General Physics (NS)(XL)

A survey of mechanics and properties of matter. Recommended for liberal arts majors and pre-professionals. Not recommended for physics majors and minors and pre-engineers. Prerequisite: Mathematics 106, Mathematics 108 or equivalent. (3+1+2) (Fall)

 

Physics/Astronomy   108                                           5 (crs.)

General Physics (NS)(XL)

A survey of waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear radiation. Recommended for liberal arts majors and pre-professionals. Not recommended for physics majors and minors. Prerequisite: Physics 107. (3+1+2) (Spring)

 

Physics/Astronomy   109                                           5 (crs.)

General Physics (NS)(XL)

A survey of mechanics, sound, and heat providing a background for advanced work in these fields. Recommended for students in pre-engineering and majors in physics, chemistry, or mathematics. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in or previous completion of Mathematics 171. (4+2) (Fall)

 

Physics/Astronomy   110                                           5 (crs.)

General Physics (NS)(XL)

A survey of electricity, magnetism, and light providing a background for advanced work in these fields. Recommended for students in pre-engineering and majors in physics, chemistry, or mathematics. Prerequisite: Physics 109 and concurrent registration in or previous completion of Mathematics 172. (4+2) (Spring)

 

Physics/Astronomy   112                                           4 (crs.)

Energy in Today's World (NS)(XL)

Focus is on the physics of energy, energy production, and energy consumption, conservation practices and alternative energy sources. Prerequisites: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam.

 

Physics/Astronomy   113                                           3 (crs.)

The Solar System - no lab (NS)

The astronomer's understanding of the earth, moon and planets. Explores the basic nature of science and the scientific method. May be used to satisfy laboratory science requirement only if Physics 123 is taken during a later term. Credit may not be earned for both Physics 113 and Physics 103. Prerequisites: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics placement Exam. (3+0) (Fall)

 

Physics/Astronomy   114                                           3 (crs.)

Stars, Galaxies and the Universe -no lab (NS)

Identical to Physics 104 except no laboratory experience is included. May be used to satisfy laboratory science requirement only if Physics 124 is taken during a later term. Credit may not be earned for both Physics 114 and Physics 104. Prerequisite: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam. (3+0) (Spring)

 

Physics/Astronomy   123                                           1 (crs.)

Solar System Laboratory (NS)

Laboratory component of the Solar System, Physics 103. Completes 4 units (crs.) applicable toward laboratory science requirement when taken following Physics 113. Prerequisite: Physics 113. (0+2) (Fall)

 

Physics/Astronomy   124                                           1 (crs.)

Stars, Galaxies and the Universe Laboratory (NS)

Laboratory component of Cosmic Evolution, Physics 104. Completes 4 units (crs.) applicable toward the laboratory science requirement when taken following Physics 114. Prerequisite: Physics 114. (0+2) (Spring)

 

Physics/Astronomy   201                                           3 (crs.)

Statics for Engineering

The action of forces on bodies at rest or in equilibrium. For pre-engineering students and not ordinarily taken by physics majors and minors. Prerequisite: Physics 107 or 109 (may be taken concurrently) and Mathematics 171. (3+0) (Fall)

 

Physics/Astronomy   202                                           3 (crs.)

Dynamics for Engineering

Motion and the action of forces that produce or modify the motion of bodies. For pre-engineering students and not ordinarily taken by physics majors and minors. Prerequisite: Physics 201 and Mathematics 172 (may be taken concurrently). (3+0) (Spring)

 

Physics/Astronomy   203                                           3 (crs.)

Introduction to Astrophysics

A systematic introduction to the concepts and methods of astrophysics, astronomical measurements and units, astrophysical nature of radiation, stellar structure, and cosmology. Prerequisite: Physics 108 and Math 171 or Physics 110.

 

Physics/Astronomy   206                                           3 (crs.)

Introductory Modern Physics

Twentieth century physics; emphasis on atomic and sub-atomic phenomena. Normally acceptable for pre-engineering students. Prerequisite: Physics 108 or 110 and Mathematics 171. (3+2) (Spring)

 

Physics/Astronomy   222                                           2 (crs.)

Physics Lab I

An experimental treatment of concepts and theories associated with modern physics and classical mechanics. Emphasis is placed on developing experimental skills and techniques appropriate for advanced laboratory work. Prerequisites: Physics 206 and concurrent registration in Physics 320.

 

Physics/Astronomy   305                                           3 (crs.)

Electronic Circuits and Devices

DC and AC circuit theory with emphasis placed on the external electrical properties of analog electronic devices and their practical applications. Prerequisite: Physics 108, 110 or consent of instructor. 305/505 (2+2)

 

Physics/Astronomy   307                                           3 (crs.)

Physical Optics

Review of geometrical optics, interference, diffraction, polarization, double refraction, electromagnetic theory of light, introduction to quantum optics and lasers. Prerequisite: Physics 110 and Mathematics 172. 307/507 (3+0)

 

Physics/Astronomy   310                                           3 (crs.)

Stellar Structure and Evolution

A systematic study of stellar atmospheres and interiors, stellar evolution and variable stars. Prerequisite: Completion of Physics 203 with a grade of C or better.

 

Physics/Astronomy   311                                           3 (crs.)

Digital Instrumentation (NS)

Fundamentals and applications of combinational and sequential digital circuits, memory and storage, microprocessors, digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion, emphasizing use in measurement and instrumentation. Prerequisite: Previous physics course or electronics course or Mathematics 212 or consent of instructor. 311/511 (3+2)

 

Physics/Astronomy   313                                           3 (crs.)

Galaxies, the Interstellar Medium and Star Formation

A systematic study of galactic components and structure, physics of the interstellar medium and star formation. Prerequisite: Completion of Physics 203 with a grade of C or better.

 

Physics/Astronomy   319                                           3 (crs.)

Digital Signal Processing

The fundamentals of digital signal processing techniques with an emphasis on their computer implementation: linear shift-invariant systems, the Z-transform, the discrete and continuous Fourier transforms, digital filter design, and inverse filters. Familiarity with calculus, complex numbers, and BASIC or FORTRAN is assumed. 319/519 (3+0)

 

Physics/Astronomy   320                                           3 (crs.)

Classical Physics

The physical and mathematical concepts associated with one-dimensional motion, two and three-dimensional motion including the use of different coordinate systems and accelerating reference frames. Analytical, numerical and graphical methods using modern computer technology will be used. Prerequisite: Physics 109 and Mathematics 172. (3+0) (Fall)

 

Physics/Astronomy   322                                           2 (crs.)

Physics Lab II

An experimental treatment of concepts and theories associated with physical optics and thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Emphasis is placed on developing experimental skills and techniques appropriate for advanced laboratory work. Prerequisites: Prior completion of or concurrent registration in Physics 307 and Physics 408.

 

Physics/Astronomy   335                                           3 (crs.)

Demonstration and Laboratory Techniques in Physics (NS)

A laboratory course to provide the high school physics teacher with opportunities to handle the physical apparatus used in modern physics curricula. Prerequisite: A two-term sequence in General Physics. 335/535 (1+3)

 

Physics/Astronomy   350                                           1 (crs.)

Research Issues in Physics Education (TC)

A survey of the Physics Education Research (PER) literature for prospective physics teachers.  Topics include common student misconceptions in mechanics, optics, and electric circuits; theoretical frameworks in education research; and basic research methods.  The course is taught in an informal discussion format (once per week)

 

Physics/Astronomy   351                                           1 (crs.)

Teaching Issues in Physics Education (TC)

A survey of teaching strategies that address common student difficulties in introductory physics.  Topics include learning cycles, classroom discourse, and group dynamics.  The course meets biweekly for an hour.  Each Physics 351 student receives an eight-hour internship experience in Workshop Physics Science (Physics 101). During this time, students will observe the instructor and engage small 3-4 member groups of physics science students.

 

Physics/Astronomy   408                                           3 (crs.)

Statistical Physics and Thermodynamics

Temperature, entropy, and other thermal quantities introduced from microscopic considerations and related to macroscopic thermodynamic variables. Calculation of macroscopic properties of matter from microscopic models. Prerequisite: Physics 320. 408/608 (3+0)

 

Physics/Astronomy   417                                           3 (crs.)

Electricity and Magnetism

An advanced treatment of important topics in electricity and magnetism. Prerequisite: Physics 320. 417/617 (3+0)

 

Physics/Astronomy   419                                           3 (crs.)

Introductory Quantum Mechanics

Development of quantum mechanics principles and application to important simple physical systems. Prerequisite: Physics 320. 419/619 (3+0)

 

Physics/Astronomy   422                                           2 (crs.)

Physics Lab III

An experimental treatment of concepts and theories associated with electromagnetism and quantum mechanics. Emphasis is placed on developing experimental skills and techniques appropriate for advanced laboratory work. Prerequisites: Prior completion of or concurrent registration in Physics 417 and Physics 419.

 

Physics/Astronomy   446                                           1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

 

Physics/Astronomy   451                                           1-3 (crs.)

Special Topics

A Physics/Astronomy course on a topic not covered in the department's curriculum. This course may be repeated with different content. Each time it is offered, the topic will be announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

 

Physics/Astronomy   456                                           1-3 (crs.)

Related Readings

See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

 

Physics/Astronomy   474                                           1-6 (crs.)

Honors: Thesis

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be Honors Thesis. Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Prerequisite: University Honors program and junior standing. Maximum of 6 units (crs.).

 

Physics/Astronomy   491                                           1-4 (crs.)

Senior Research Project
Independent research arranged with a faculty supervisor. A contract must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the department chairman prior to registration. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Minimum of 15 units (crs.) of physics completed.


Engineering Technology


Engineering Technology   101                                           2 (crs.)

Fundamentals of Engineering Technology

This course is designed to equip engineering technology students with the necessary tools and background information to prepare them to be a successful student as well as a successful practicing engineering technologist. Topics covered in this course include ethics, project managements, team work, working with data, creating presentations, engineering design and a thorough understanding of the engineering profession.

 

Engineering Technology   103                                           3 (crs.)

Surveying

Fundamental concepts and theory of surveying; adjustment and use of instruments; measurement of distance, difference in elevation, angles and directions; route and construction surveying; computations, errors and statistical analysis of field data using basic probability concepts. Prerequisites: Math 106 or placement in/completion of any higher math course.

 

Engineering Technology   105                                           3 (crs.)

Fundamentals of Drawing

Introduces common industry drafting practices in the design process with an emphasis on computer-aided drafting/design (CAD). Topics include sketching, drawing setup and organization, dimensioning, orthographic and isometric projections, and CAD standards and guidelines.

 

Engineering Technology   106                                           2 (crs.)

Parametric Modeling I

Introduces parametric-based solid modeling techniques. Topics include creating and editing solid parts, assemblies, and working drawings. Students will learn to create exploded views and bills of materials and to apply top-down and bottom-up assembly techniques in the context of product design. Prerequisite: Engineering Technology 105.

 

Engineering Technology   116                                           3 (crs.)

Basic Manufacturing Process

Introduces machining, stamping, casting, forging and joining of metallic and non-metallic materials. Covers the basic machining processes used to cut, form and shape materials to desire forms, dimensions and surface finishes. Students examine the manufacturing of metals, heat treatments, foundry work, metals and plastics casting, rolling, extrusion and welding. Prerequisite: Engineering Tech 101.

 

Engineering Technology   118                                           2 (crs.)

Fluids I

An introduction to hydraulics and pneumatics including properties of fluids, basic pneumatic and hydraulic circuits and their schematics, and airflow control. Applications include Pascal's Law, effects of fluid friction, and designing hydraulic circuits with control valves. Prerequisites: Physics 107 or 109

 

Engineering Technology   130                                           3 (crs.)

Basic Electrical Circuits I

This course uses theory, laboratory investigation, and circuit simulation software to introduce basic electrical and circuit analysis principles. Emphasis is placed on direct current (DC) circuits containing voltage and current sources and resistor networks in series, parallel, and series-parallel configurations. This course also introduces the concepts of electric and magnetic fields in the context of capacitors and inductors and their transient responses in DC circuits. A unit on basic alternating current (AC) resistive circuits with sinusoidal voltage and currant sources is included.

 

Engineering Technology   131                                           3 (crs.)

Basic Electrical Circuits II

This course uses theory, laboratory investigation, and circuit simulation software to introduce basic electrical and circuit analysis principles. Emphasis is placed on the steady state characteristics of sinusoidal alternating current (AC) circuits with resistive and reactive (capacitors and inductors) elements in series, parallel, and series-parallel configurations. Transformers, three-phase power, frequency response analysis, and selected direct current (DC) topics will also be introduced. Prerequisite: Engineering Technology: 130.

 

Engineering Technology   142                                           3 (crs.)

Introduction to Programming

An introductory course in computer programming using the language C++. Topics covered include problem solving, algorithms, selection statements, repetition, arrays, functions and sub-programs. Applications to electrical engineering technology are made. Prerequisites: Engineering Tech 101 and Math 106.

 

Engineering Technology   150                                           3 (crs.)

Codes, Safety and Standards

This course provides an interpretive survey of various codes as applied to the electrical construction industry, including the National Electric Code with discussion of related safety organizations and their guidelines, including OSHA, IEEE, IEC, ISA, ANSI, and UL. Classroom and shop experience provide a basic overview of wiring, including switches and receptacles, metallic and non-metallic sheathed cable, light fixtures, equipment wiring, and conduit. Safety procedures and up-to-date codes are emphasized. Prerequisite: Engineering Tech 130.

 

Engineering Technology   201                                           3 (crs.)

Introduction to Air Quality

An overview of global air currents, major air pollutants and sources, transport of these by air currents, EPA standards for air pollutants, abatement methods such as scrubbers on coal burning power plants, non-attainment status and consequences.

 

Engineering Technology   202                                           3 (crs.)

Introduction to Water and Wastewater

An overview of global water sources, drinking water quality and treatment, pollutants and their sources, and consequences to water quality, storm water management systems and storm water quality.

 

Engineering Technology   203                                           2 (crs.)

Introduction to Solid Waste

Topics include generation, processing, and disposal of municipal, industrial, and agricultural waste materials with emphasis on the technical and economic feasibility of various processes.

 

Engineering Technology   207                                           2 (crs.)

Parametric Modeling II

Topics include advanced techniques for creating fully dimensioned orthographic drawings for part models, cast parts, molded parts, and sheet metal components with weldments. Surface modeling will be emphasized, and students will be introduced to software tools with kinematics and finite element stress analysis capabilities. Prerequisite: Engineering Technology 106.

 

Engineering Technology   220                                           3 (crs.)

Mechanics of Materials

Introduces the distribution of forces in materials, trusses and other rigid structures under load. Topics include stress and strain, torsion, shear and bending moments, thermal expansion and stress, Mohr's Circle, and column theory. Analysis techniques to ensure that a component is safe with respect to strength, rigidity and stability are included. Prerequisite: Physics 201.

 

Engineering Technology   221                                           3 (crs.)

Machine Components

Introduces the basic concepts and techniques used in the design of a machine. The components studied include gears, shafts, cams, bearings, belts and other hardware. The importance of using reference handbooks and catalog specifications in choosing appropriate components for various applications is stressed.

 

Engineering Technology   232                                           3 (crs.)

Semiconductor Devices

Introduces properties of semiconductor materials and how they are manipulated to create several types of diodes, transistors, and optoelectronic devices. The theory and operation of these devices is explored in the context of a wide array of applications including rectifier, amplifier, and switching circuits. Laboratory experiments are performed to measure device characteristics and verify circuit performance. Prerequisite: ENGR Tech 130 and concurrent registration in or prior completion of ENGR Tech 131.

 

Engineering Technology   233                                           3 (crs.)

Linear Circuits

This course focuses on the operation, analysis, and application of linear active circuits utilizing transistors, operational amplifiers, comparators, mixers, and other components as well as integrated circuit functions such as converters and phase locked loops. This course uses a balance of theory, analysis using circuit simulation software, and practical application through laboratory investigation and troubleshooting. Prerequisites: Engineering Technology 232 or Engineering Technology 131 and permission of instructor.

 

Engineering Technology   240                                           3 (crs.)

Microcontrollers and Programmable Logic Controllers

This course introduces students to embedded computer systems through exploration of microcontroller operation, architecture and programming and explores microcontroller peripherals using programming. Programmable logic controller programming topics such as troubleshooting, timers, counters, sequencers, and analog input and output are covered. Prerequisites: Comp Sci 142 or ENGR Tech 142 and Phys/Ast 311.

 

Engineering Technology   301                                           3 (crs.)

Advanced Air Pollution and Treatment

This course will provide students a fundamental understanding of atmospheric processes and weather patterns and how they affect pollutant transport. Sources, sinks, health and environmental effects, and abatement technologies for air pollutants will be addressed. In addition, atmospheric reactions that create pollution or deplete stratospheric ozone will be included. Prerequisites: Two semesters of general chemistry (Chemistry 105 and 106 or 109 and 110), one semester of general physics (Phys/Ast 107 or 109), and one semester of microbiology (Biology 309) or consent of instructor.

 

Engineering Technology   302                                           3 (crs.)

Advanced Water and Wastewater

This course will investigate water and wastewater treatment technology past and present. The course targets a general engineering and/or science student. Technical and design considerations will also be explored. Both rural and large municipal systems will be discussed. Lectures will contain examples from real world applications (preferable in Wisconsin) and in-progress industrial developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on local water and wastewater installations. Prerequisites: Two semesters of general chemistry (Chemistry 105 and 106 or 109 and 110), one semester of general physics (Phys/Ast 107 or 109), and one semester of microbiology (Biology 309) or consent of instructor.

 

Engineering Technology   308                                           3 (crs.)

Finite Element Analysis

Introduces the finite element analysis (FEA) method and its application to stress analysis and structural mechanics. Topics include standard FEA techniques in one, two, and three dimensional systems, design optimization using FEA, incorporation of failure criteria and other constraints, and the interpretation of FEA results to ensure correctness. Prerequisites: ENGR TECH 207 and ENGR TECH 220 and Math 172.

 

Engineering Technology   318                                           2 (crs.)

Fluids II

The theory of fluid dynamics including hydrostatic forces, buoyancy, viscosity, and stability. Applications include Bernoulli's equation, pipe flow, open-channel flow, drag and lift. Prerequisites: ENGR TECH 118 and Math 172.

 

Engineering Technology   320                                           3 (crs.)

Motors and Drives

Selection, setup and circuitry association with AC and DC drives and motors. Topics include DC motor and generator characteristics, configurations, and performance measures. Series and compound DC motors, AC induction motors, stepper motors, servomotors, and three-phase power systems are also included. Prerequisites: ENGR TECH 130 and Phys/Ast 108 or 110.

 

Engineering Technology   322                                           3 (crs.)

Design Problems

Design principles and methods are applied to create a product or a machine. Students work within a team to prepare concepts sketches, assembly drawings, detail drawings and perform stress and cost analysis. Prerequisites: ENGR Tech 106 and ENGR Tech 220 and ENGR Tech 221.

 

Engineering Technology   325                                           3 (crs.)

Signals and Systems

An introductions to analysis techniques for continuous time and discrete time signals and typical model systems. Topics include system definitions and properties such as linearity, causality, time invariance and stability. Signal representations including Fourier and Laplace transforms will be used in convolution calculations, transfer functions and determinations of system responses. Applications to circuit analysis will be made. Software packages such as MATLAB will be used in laboratory and course work. Prerequisites: Math 172 and ENGR Tech 232.

 

Engineering Technology   330                                           3 (crs.)

Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer

Topics include the first and second laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of real and ideal gases, vapors, and mixtures, and analysis of power and refrigeration cycles. Heat transfer topics include conduction, convection and radiation mechanisms with applications to thermal insulation, heat sink, and heat exchanger design. Prerequisites: Phys/Ast 108 or Phys/Ast 110 and Math 172.

 

Engineering Technology   340                                           3 (crs.)

Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers

Topics such as interfacing programmable logic controllers to communicate with each other, remote control of inputs and outputs, and networking devices together into a complete system are covered. Actuators used in typical industrial-related process are explored, and principles of open and closed loop control systems are applied. Signal conditioning and connection configurations are studied and applied. Prerequisites: ENGR Tech 240

 

Engineering Technology   346                                           3 (crs.)

Electric Power Systems and Distribution

Characteristics of various three-phase power configurations and in-plant power distribution are covered. Students will also gain exposure utility systems interconnection from generation through distribution, which includes the utility grid, device coordination, metering, relays, fuses, breakers and fault interrupters. Prerequisites: ENGR Tech 131 and ENGR Tech 232.

 

Engineering Technology   348                                           3 (crs.)

Electromagnetic Fields and Applications

This course includes electromagnetic vector quantities and vector operations in spherical, cylindrical, and rectangular coordinate systems Static and dynamic systems are explored in the context of applications such as circuits, dielectric and permeable materials, transmission lines, antennas and wave-guides. Prerequisites: ENGR TECH 233 and (Phys/AST 108 or 110)

 

Engineering Technology   350                                           3 (crs.)

Data Communication and Protocols

The concepts needed to understand the important field of data communications and networking are explored in this course. The principles associated with data communication, transmission media, interfaces, error and flow control, synchronization, and switching are investigated. The course concentrates on the physical and data link layers of communication networks. Commonly used protocols and interface standards are emphasized. Prerequisites: Math 171 and ENGR Tech 232 and Phys/Ast 311

 

Engineering Technology   360                                           3 (crs.)

Project Management

This course is an overview of project management with an emphasis on engineering projects. Topics include pre-construction planning, project scheduling systems, critical path management, risk and effects analysis, and failure modes.

 

Engineering Technology   375                                           3 (crs.)

Renewable Energy

This course will be an introduction to renewable energy technology past and present. The course targets a general engineering and/or science student to the concepts of renewable energy. Social issues related to renewal energy adoption will also be explored. Lectures will contain examples from real world applications (preferable in Wisconsin) and in-progress industrial developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on local renewable energy installations. Prerequisites: Two lab science courses including Biology 105, 233 or 309, Geology 150, Chemistry 105, 106, 109 or 110 or Phys/Ast 107, 108, 109 or 110 or consent of instructor.

 

Engineering Technology   388                                           4-6 (crs.)

Field Experience in BioEnergy

An onsite experience in the theoretical and practical aspects of bioenergy facility construction, operation, and development. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

 

Engineering Technology   390                                           4 (crs.)

Mechatronics

The study of the integration of mechanical, electrical, and electronic systems. Students from the Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Technology programs will form multidisciplinary teams and will design and build a project using an electromechanical control system. Prerequisites: ENGR Tech 320 and 322 or ENGR Tech 233 and 240.

 

Engineering Technology   401                                           1-3 (crs.)

Capstone Project

 

This course will provide the student with a culminating experience in their chosen area of engineering technology. This project will apply principals of engineering technology into practice during an off campus experience. Prerequisite: Senior and consent of instructor.

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