Personal tools
You are here: Home > Undergrad Bulletins > 2013-2015 > Departments and Majors > Environmental Studies

Environmental Studies

Information

Information

David Barnhill, Director

Department Office: Sage Hall 3451
Department Telephone: (920) 424-0964
Code 37 or ENV STDS

Faculty

Faculty

Brown (Anthropology) Pillsbury (Biology/Microbiology) 
Coulibaly (Geography and Urban Studies) Plude (Chemistry)
Cross (Geography and Urban Affairs) Rainboth (Biology/Microbiology)
Dunn (Business) Rindo (English)
Feldman (Environmental Studies) Roth (English) 
Gutow (Chemistry) Scribner (Political Science)
Haley (Economics) Simmons (Political Science)
Haynes (English) Slagter (Political Science)
Hiatt (Geology) Spehar (Anthropology)
Hinrichs (Communication) Stelzer (Biology/Microbiology)
Holton (Biology/Microbiology) Van Auken (Sociology/Environmental Studies)
Kleinheinz (Biology/Microbiology) Wise (Biology/Microbiology)
Lammers (Biology/Microbiology) Zaniewski (Geography and Urban Planning)
Landry (English)

Degrees

Degrees

  • Undergraduate: A major in Environmental Studies can lead to the degree(s): Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Science.

  • Graduate: None

Summary of Fields of Study

Summary of Fields of Study

  1. Goal(s)

    • Environmental Studies is the study of the relationships between human culture and living systems. It is also a study with a purpose: to understand the social variables that lead to environmental degradation and to inspire critical thought and action in response. Thus, it is a course of study for people who care about environmental issues and want to contribute to the resolution of environmental problems.

  2. The Major(s)

    • The program offers a single Interdisciplinary major, the Environmental Studies major. Within the Environmental Studies major, the Department offers a choice of two emphases: 1) Environmental Policy and Values; 2) Environmental Science.

  3. The Minor(s)

    • The program offers one minor: (1) Environmental Studies. The minor is licensable for students in the elementary education (Early Childhood - Early Adolescence, Middle Childhood - Early Adolescence) or secondary education (Early Adolescence Ð Adolescence) with majors in Broad Field Natural Science, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science or Physics.

Admission/Graduation Requirements

Admission/Graduation Requirements

To be eligible for graduation, students must meet all requirements for the degree being sought in addition to earning a minimum grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the Environmental Studies major or minor. Refer to the following for complete requirements. Those students seeking Wisconsin teacher licensure must earn a minimum grade point average of 3.00 in all courses required for their majors and minors in order to meet the requirements of the College of Education and Human Services.

Required Core Courses

Required Core Courses

  • Environmental Studies: 3 units (crs.)

    • Environmental Studies 101

  • Environmental Science: 11 units (crs.)

    • Two of the following: Chemistry 103, Biology 105, Geography 121, Geology 150

    • Environmental Studies 260

  • Environmental Policy and Values: 9 units (crs.)

    • Religious Studies 162/Environmental Studies 162 or 243 or 244

    • Environmental Studies 261

    • Environmental Studies 282

  • Advanced Environmental Policy and Values: 6 units (crs.)

    • Two approved upper level Policy and Values courses other than Geography

  • Advanced Environmental Science: 6-7 units (crs.)

    • Two approved upper level Environmental Studies courses

  • Interdisciplinary Seminars: 6 units (crs.)

    • Environmental Studies 370, 490

The Major(s), with Emphases and/or Options

The Major(s), with Emphases and/or Options

Environmental Studies Major

In Addition to the Core Courses:

A. Environmental Science Emphasis: 22-24 units (crs.)
  • Introductory Science: 10 units (crs.)
    • Chemistry 105, 106

Environmental Science Breadth

  • Courses from two of the four following areas.

    • Biology/Ecology: Biology 349, Environmental Studies 305

    • Chemistry: Chemistry 221

    • Resource Management: Geography 314

    • Earth Science: Geography 461; Geology (any upper level Geology course approved for the major)

(Note: The areas must be different than the track chosen for the depth requirement. Must complete two courses in this category and these courses may be the same as those taken for the Advanced Environmental Science requirement in the core. These courses may not be the same as those taken for the Advanced Environmental Policy and Values requirement in the core.)

  • Environmental Science Depth

    • Four approved upper-level courses in one of the three Environmental Science Tracks. (Note: These courses may be the same as those taken for the Advanced Environmental Science requirement in the core. These courses may not be the same as those taken for the Advanced Environmental Policy and Values requirement in the core. Upper-level environmental science courses that are not cross-listed in any science department may be approved to serve as depth requirement courses.)

    • Up to three of these credits can be an internship or independent study in that department.

    1. Biology/Ecology Track:

    • Anthropology/Environmental Studies: Anthropology 372 or Environmental Studies 372.

    • Anthropology/Environmental Studies: Anthropology 368 or Environmental Studies 368.

    • Biology/Environmental Studies: Biology 314 or Environmental Studies 314; Biology 318 or Environmental Studies 318.

    • Biology: Biology 325, 326, 327, 336, 349, 376, 386.

    • Environmental Studies: Environmental Studies 391, 396.

    • Nursing: Nursing 361.

    2. Resource Management Track:

    • Biology/Environmental Studies: Biology 318 or Environmental Studies 318.

    • Geography: Geography 313, 314, 364, 371, 382, 391, 414, 471, 472.

    3. Earth Science Track:

      • Geography: Geography 304, 335, 363.

      • Geology: Geology 320, 328, 335, 365, 366, 370, 371

B. Environmental Policy and Values Emphasis: 15-17 units (crs.)

 

  • Environmental Policy and Values Depth

    • Four courses from the Policy, Planning, and Resource Management Track or the Society and Values Track.  (Note: These courses may be the same as those taken for the Advanced Environmental Policy and Values requirement in the core.) Courses counting for the Environmental Policy and  Values Breadth requirement cannot also count for the Environmental Policy and Values Depth requirement.

  • Environmental Policy and Values Breadth

    • Two courses from the track not chosen for the depth requirement (Note: These courses may be the same as those taken for the Advanced Environmental Policy and Values requirement in the core.) Courses counting for the Environmental Policy and Values Breadth requirement cannot also count for the Environmental Policy and Values Depth requirement.

  • Environmental Policy and Values Skills

    One course from the following: Communication 275, Economics 355, 360, Environmental Studies 375, Geography 391, 471 (Note: A course taken as satisfying a skill cannot double count as a course in the Advanced Environmental Policy and Values depth requirement or the Advanced Environmental Policy and Values breadth requirement.)

1. Policy, Planning, and Resource Management Track

      • Anthropology/Environmental Studies: Anthropology 368 or Environmental Studies 368
      • Business/Environmental Studies: Business 450 or Environmental Studies 450
      • Geography: Geography 304, 311, 313, 314, 335, 363, 364, 371, 377, 382, 391, 414, 419, 471, 472.
      • Economics: Economics 355, 360.
      • Environmental Studies: Environmental Studies 310, 311, 320.
      • Political Science: Political Science 316, 326, 388 or Environmental Studies 388.
      • Public Administration: Public Administration 391.
      • Sociology/Environmental Studies: Sociology 315 or Environmental Studies 315.
      • Urban Studies: Urban Studies 310, 317.

     2. Society and Values Track

        1. Anthropology: Anthropology 348.
        2. Anthropology/Environmental Studies: Anthropology 380 or Environmental Studies 380.
        3. Communication/Environmental Studies: Communication 455 or Environmental Studies 455.
        4. English/Environmental Studies: English 342 or Environmental Studies 342.
        5. English/Environmental Studies: English 343 or Environmental Studies 343.
        6. Environmental Studies: Environmental Studies 300, 332, 375, 390, 395, 414.
        7. History/Environmental Studies: History 326 or Environmental Studies 326.
        8. History/Environmental Studies: History 339 or Environmental Studies 339.
        9. History/Environmental Studies: History 345 or Environmental Studies 345.
        10. History/Environmental Studies: History 355 or Environmental Studies 355.
        11. Religious Studies: Religious Studies 362.
        12. Sociology: Sociology 407.
        13. Sociology/Environmental Studies: Sociology 313 or Environmental Studies 313.
        14. Women's Studies/Environmental Studies: Women's Studies 365 or Environmental Studies 365.

        The Minor(s)

        Environmental Studies Minor

        • Required Units (crs.): 25 minimum

        • Required Courses: 25 units (crs.):

          • Environment and Science Area, Seven units (crs.) as follows: Four units (crs.) from Biology 105, Chemistry 103, Geology 150, Geography and Urban Planning 121; and 3 units (crs.) from Biology 260/ Environmental Studies 260.

          • Environment and Society Area, Six units (crs.) as follows: Three units (crs.) from Environmental Studies 101, and three units (crs.) from Environmental Studies 261/Political Science 261/Sociology 261.

          • Environment and Values area, Six units (crs.), three units (crs.) from English 243/Environmental Studies 243, English 244/Environmental Studies 244, Religious Studies 162/Environmental Studies 162; Three units (crs.) from Environmental Studies 272, 282.

          • Interdisciplinary Seminars, Six units (crs.) from Environmental Studies 370, Environmental Studies 490

        Course Offering(s)

        Course Offering(s)

        Environmental Studies 101                                 3 (crs.)

        Seminar on Environmental Issues (SS) (XS)

        An interdisciplinary course exploring the complex relationships between humans and ecosystems. Conservation biology, social science and environmental ethics will be introduced to illuminate contemporary environmental issues (specific topics will vary). The course will facilitate critical questioning about the proper relationship between humans and the natural world, while providing an introduction to the field of environmental studies.  Prerequisite:  Course is to be limited to students with less than 60 credits or Environmental Studies majors and minors or those with department consent.

         

         

        Environmental Studies  102                              3 (crs.)

        Introduction to Sustainability (XS) (SS)

        This course explores the many contested meanings of the term "sustainability". Sustainability might mean, for some people, nothing more than tips for how to live "green". In this class, however, we will treat sustainability as a lens of inquiry, a way of analyzing and assessing the complicated social, economic and environmental problems that our society faces in the twenty-first century. These issues arise all around us, in the food we eat, the cars we drive and the communities that we inhabit. And they occur at a variety of scales from the very local (such as the campus of the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh) to the global. There is no single path to sustainability, no single solution to complicated problems. In this class, we will learn to think critically about sustainability issues, policies, solutions and responsibilities. We will seek to answer the question: How do people understand and create a sustainable world?

         

         

        Environmental Studies   162                               3 (crs.)

        Religion and Nature (HU)

        Examines diverse perspectives regarding values and environmental responsibility as well as the social actors and movements which embody them. Foci may include: Western Civilization and environmental ethics, environmental values in non-western cultures, environmental values in small scale societies, the aesthetics of nature (including as represented in visual art), religious perceptions of place, environmental values in fiction, prose and poetry, and ecological ethics and technology. Credit cannot be received for both Environmental Studies 162 and Religious Studies 162.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   243                              3 (crs.)

        Introduction to Nature Writing (HU) (XC)

        An introduction to nature writing. Various authors and historical periods may be covered. Focus on the personal essay, but poetry and fiction may also be considered. Writing assignments will be required. Cross-listed: English 243/Environmental Studies 243. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross listed courses. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   244                               3 (crs.)

        Japanese Nature Writing (HU) (NW) (XC)

        An examination of selected Japanese literary works, with a focus on the significance of nature in Japanese literature. All texts are in English translation. Cross-listed: English 244/Environmental Studies 244.  Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross listed courses.  Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

         

         

        Environmental Studies  260                              3 (crs.)

        Environmental Science

        A core course for Environmental Studies that will provide an overview of: 1) scientific principles on which studies of the environment are based; 2) current understandings of environmental problems from a scientific perspective; and 3) evaluation of scientific evidence. Prerequisite: Restricted to Environmental Studies majors and minors, or by permission.

         

         

        Environmental Studies 261                                 3 (crs.)

        Environment and Society (SS)

        Examines relationships between social structure, culture and natural environments; compares different modes of production and cultural systems. Examines economic, political and ideological structures of industrial and industrializing societies. Analyzes the impact of these structures upon natural environments and analyzes the impact of natural environment upon these structures. Sociology 261/Environmental Studies 261/Political Science 261. Students may receive credit for only one of the three cross-listed courses. Special course fees may apply.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   272                              3 (crs.)

        Environment, Communication & Culture (SS)

        Introduces cultural, media and communication studies, focusing on the cultural communication of environmental issues and ideas. Addresses how environmental issues are framed and represented by various media; how these images and representations are taken up and made use of within a variety of cultural communities and discourses; and the different ways in which environmental ideas circulate between media, science and popular and alternative cultures in North America today.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   282                               3 (crs.)

        Environment, Community and Values (HU)

        An interdisciplinary humanities course, which examines how social, religious, aesthetic and philosophical values are interwoven in the context of environmental themes and case studies. Explores the commonalities and differences among these three disciplines, their powers and limits, and the connections between the humanities and the social sciences and sciences in an environmental context. Students critically analyze current movements and leading thinkers by studying literature, personal essays, cultural critiques and philosophical arguments. Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 101 and one of the following: Environmental Studies 162 or 243 or 244 or consent of instructor. Special Course fee $20.00.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   300                         1-3 (crs.)

        Internship

        An internship experienced with a cooperating organization. Students apply their knowledge and skills in environmental studies to real world problems. The number of units and the criteria for the grading will be agreed upon in advance with the faculty member who is the on-campus supervisor. Course may be repeated for up to a total of six units (crs.).  Prerequisite: Environmental Studies major or minor or consent of Director of Environmental Studies.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   301                               1-3 (crs.)

        Internship in Environmental Science

        An internship experience with a cooperating organization, with a primary focus in scientific research and/or methods. The number of units and the criteria for the grading will be agreed upon in advance with the faculty member who is the on-campus supervisor. Prerequisites: Environmental studies major or minor or consent of Director of Environmental Studies.

         

         

        Environmental Studies 305                               3 (crs.)

        The Biology, Identification and Management of Invasive Species

        Invasive species frequently cause serious ecologic, social and economic effects. This course will explore the individual biology, identification and management of invasive species on a case-by-case basis. Terrestrial and aquatic plants and animals, both native and non-native, will be covered. Invasive species with the most notable ecological and economic impacts in the Midwest will be emphasized, but examples from and around the world will be used. We will also consider potential impacts of impending introductions. Prerequisites: Environmental Studies 260 or Biology 260.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   310                             3 (crs.)

        Comprehensive Planning

        This course introduces students to the comprehensive urban planning process. Students will engage in data collection and analysis. Students will engage in data collection and analysis, and will critique existing comprehensive plans. Prerequisites: Urban Ping 300 and Geography 391 with a grade of C or better in both courses, Geography 471 (may be taken concurrently).

         

         

        Environmental Studies   311                              3 (crs.)

        Economic Geography

        A topical approach to the analysis of spatial variations in man's activities related to producing, distributing, servicing and consuming various products. Prerequisite: Geography 111.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   313                               3 (crs.)

        Rural Sociology (SS)

        In recent decades, our world has become an urban one, yet rural places remain sociologically interesting. This course covers topics including community, agriculture, immigration and demographic change, consumption and the environment, and modern life in rural Wisconsin. In particular, it explores two important trends taking place in the rural U.S., including Wisconsin: the rise of large-scale industrialized agriculture and the simultaneous increase in popularity of community-supported agriculture and small-scale farms. Sociology 313/Environmental Studies 313. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor. Special course fees may apply.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   314                              3 (crs.)

        Principles of Wildlife Management

        This course is designed to help students bridge the gap between academic experience and advances into the wildlife profession. The course will apply population and community ecology to the management and conservation of wild populations. Cross-listed: Environmental Studies 314/Biology 314. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Environmental Studies 260 and Biology 349 or consent of instructor.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   315                               3 (crs.)

        Population Problems (SS)

        How many people, of what kind, are where? How come? And so what? These questions are often tied to so-called population problems, and this course explores important questions like these, by studying fertility, mortality and immigration in the U.S. and around the globe. Learning what these components of demography are, how to measure them, and what they mean is critical to not only understanding current affairs but also the future of human populations. Sociology 315/Environmental Studies 315. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   316                             3 (crs.)

        Environmental Law and Policy

        This course focuses on U.S. (federal) environmental law and policy, especially laws related to social behaviors and climate change. The course examines policy-making processes, particularly in administrative agencies. Specific policy areas include air, water, waste and energy policy, but students have the opportunity to examine their own policy areas of interest. The course also probes philosophical and social underpinnings of environmental law, such as ecofeminism, capitalism, collectivism and cost-benefit analyses. One of the main course themes is examining environmental law and policy through a sustainability lens. Students are strongly recommended to have prior coursework or an equivalent understanding of basic principles of American government (Poli Sci 105) and Environmental Studies (either Env Stds 101 or Poli Sci/Env Stds 261).

         

         

        Environmental Studies  318                              3 (crs.)

        Wildlife Behavior and Conservation

        This course is designed to teach the fundamental theory of behavioral ecology and then apply that theory to wildlife conservation. We will examine how environments shape organisms' lives and what that means for our efforts to manage and conserve species. The specific course objectives are to: 1) gain a rigorous biological foundation in behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology, and related topics in order to understand how environments shape behavior; 2) provide a forum for discussion of current issues in conservation biology; and 3) develop a framework for applying behavior ecological theory to wildlife conservation. Cross-listed: Biology 318/Environmental Studies 318. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Biology 105 or Biology 260/Environmental Studies 260 or consent of instructor. (3+0)

         

         

        Environmental Studies 320                               3 (crs.)

        Topics in Campus Sustainability

        This course examines the concept of sustainability at three levels: 1) as a social issue facing the global community; 2) as a guiding principle for the operations, teaching, research and outreach at institutions of higher education; and 3) as a set of specific challenges facing our own university. Students in this course will engage in a variety of hands-on projects designed to explore these three elements of sustainability. Prerequisites: Environmental Studies 101 or consent of the instructor. Special course fees may apply.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   326                             3 (crs.)

        American Environmental History (SS)

        A survey of the major topics and issues in North American environmental history from the early native American experience through the twentieth century. Cross-listed: History 326/Environmental Studies 326. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   328                             1 (crs.)

        Energy and Facilities Management

        The assessment of current and potential energy systems with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Examination of energy technologies in each fuel cycle state for fossil (oil, gas, synthetic), solar, biomass, wind, hydro, nuclear, and geothermal energy types, along with storage, transmission, and conservation issues. Focus on evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems and building efficiency in the context of facilities management. Cross-listed with Business 328. Students may only receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: NOTE: For any student not admitted to the College of Business, the prerequisites to enroll in the upper level courses for the Sustainable Management minor is 60 credits earned, 2.5 combined GPA and limit of six credits of upper-level business classes per semester. Business 328/Environmental Studies 328

         

         

        Environmental Studies 329                               1 (crs.)

        Creating Healthy, Sustainable Communities

        This course provides an opportunity to learn how healthy people, healthy communities and health-promoting environments all intersect at the bottom line. This course will explore business practices that foster employee, community and environmental health. In addition to discussing community-based programming trends and initiatives, the course will also focus on community needs assessment processes, community-based participatory research and enhancing collective efficacy. We will discuss major social issues and how they impact healthy, sustainable communities. Cross-listed with Business 329. Students may only receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: NOTE: For any student not admitted to the College of Business, the prerequisites to enroll in the upper level courses for this minor is 60 credits earned, 2.5 combined GPA and limit of six credits of upper-level business classes per semester. Environmental Studies 329/Business 329

         

         

        Environmental Studies   330                             3 (crs.)

        Sustainability Management

        This course is designed to introduce students to the issues surrounding the natural environment; specifically, how daily and long-term business measures and accounts for social and environmental capital. This is a hands-on course in which you will be required to do much introspection, reading, and group discussion. Coverage includes corporate social responsibility and environmental management reporting. Cross-listed with Business 330. Students may only receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: NOTE: for any student not admitted to the College of Business, the prerequisites to enroll in the upper level courses for this minor is 60 credits earned, 2.5 combined GPA and limit of six credits of upper-level business classes per semester. Business 330/Environmental Studies 330

         

         

        Environmental Studies   332                              3 (crs.)

        Radical Environmentalism

        Radical environmental groups have drawn increasing attention as they engage in lifestyle activism, civil disobedience, sabotage and violence in their efforts to prevent and reverse environmental degradation. This course explores cultural tributaries and diverse forms of such movements, examining the worldviews (ecological understandings, cosmologies, religious perceptions, and political ideologies) that animate their members, the reactions they engender and their various impacts and likely, future prospects.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   339                             3 (crs.)

        Public History

        Examines the practice of history outside of academia and explores the connections between American history, popular memory, landscapes and community identity; examines the historic origins and contemporary implications of a "sense of place." Cross-Listed: History 339/Environmental Studies 339. Students may receive credit for only one of these two cross-listed courses. Prerequisite: Nine credits of history or environmental studies, or instructor's consent.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   342                             3 (crs.)

        Literature of the Romantic Era Green Romanticism:  Optional Content

        Examines the important role Romantic literature has played in the history of Western environmentalism and role that environmental science and environmentalism have played in the Romantic movements. Examines the relationships between people and how the landscape is imagined in poetry and prose, and how both literature and the land itself is structured by institutions of class, economics, gender, science and law. This course may be offered with different content. Cross-listed: Environmental Studies 342/English 342. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Prerequisite: English 281 or consent of instructor. 342/542

         

         

        Environmental Studies   343                             3 (crs.)

        Nature Writing: Optional Content

        This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A course in reading and writing about the natural world.  Writers discussed may include Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, Annie Dillard and others.  Student writing will represent a significant portion of the coursework.  Writing assignments may include essays on natural history, journal entries, environmental advocacy pieces, eco-fiction, and others consistent with the focus of the course. Cross-listed English 343/Environmental Studies 343.  Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisite: English 281 or consent of instructor.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   345                               3 (crs.)

        History of American Wilderness

        Examines the history of changing American ideas about wilderness, the history of nature protection in the United States; explores current debates over the proper methods of wilderness preservation. Cross-Listed: History 345/Environmental Studies 345. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisite: Three credits of history or environmental studies, or instructor's consent.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   354                               3 (crs.)

        Latin American Environmental History

        This class discusses a series of topics relevant to the environmental history of Latin America. Among these topics are the early population of the Americas and the development of sedentary habits. It also covers an analysis of the pre-Hispanic civilizations and their interaction with their landscape. The course also includes an analysis of the effects of the Spanish conquest and of the challenges created by the construction of the Atlantic Empires in early modern times. Health issues will be at the course of this analysis, in particular, the yellow fever epidemics that ravaged the Caribbean basin between 1790 and the early twentieth-century. Cross-listed: Environmental Studies 354/History 354, students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: History 101 or History 102.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   355                               3 (crs.)

        Global Environmental History

        Examines the way that the natural environment intersects with major themes in world history, including industrialization, colonialism, frontiers and war. Investigates the environmental context and consequences of these and other subjects with the understanding that the natural world can shape human history and that the events of human history have played and continue to play, key roles in shaping the environment. Cross-listed History 355/Environmental Studies 355. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Three credits of history or environmental studies, or instructor's consent.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   365                              3 (crs.)

        Gender and Nature (SS)

        This course offers an introduction to the connections between concepts of gender and nature in the West. It examines ecological feminist theories about the relationship between the domination of nature and the subordination of women as well as the impact of gender differences on ideas and experiences of nature. Topics include: scientific explanations of the nature of gender, the feminization of nature in Western thought, the roles of men and women in the environmental movement and the gendered division of environmental risk, work and benefits in contemporary political economies. Cross-listed: Environmental Studies 365/Women's Studies 365. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   368                               3 (crs.)

        Human Dimensions of Wildlife Conservation

        This course focuses on the most central issue in the conservation of wildlife: people. This course will integrate perspectives from conservation biology and environmental anthropology, focusing particularly on the interaction between humans and the environment and how this influences the effectiveness and appropriateness of measures taken to preserve biodiversity. The course includes a discussion of perspectives on the value of biodiversity; a careful exploration of human-generated threats to biodiversity, including habitat destruction, over-hunting, the wildlife trade, invasive species and global warming; and an extensive overview and critique of conservation solutions, such as the creation of protected areas, community-based conservation, ecotourism, economic incentives programs, debt-for-nature swaps and more. The effects of globalization on international conservation will be an integral part of this discussion. Cross-listed: Anthropology 368/Environmental Studies 368. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   370                               3 (crs.)

        Environmental Science, Policy & Problem Solving (SS)

        Drawing on interdisciplinary sources that comprise contemporary environmental science research, this course examines the capability of these sciences to provide solutions to environmental problems and enhances student abilities to critically evaluate environmental management, policy and modeling tools. The influential role environmental scientists exert on local, regional and national policies will be examined through case studies. Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 260 (Environmental Science) and Environmental Studies 261 (Environment and society), or department consent.

         

         

        Environmental Studies 372                               3 (crs.)

        Primate Behavior and Ecology

        This course is designed to introduce students to our closest living relatives, the nonhuman primates (monkeys, apes, and prosimians). The course will focus on primate diversity and characteristics, ecology, social behavior, communication, cognition and conservation. We will also discuss the relevance of primate studies to understanding human evolution. This course will involve at least one field trip to the Milwaukee zoo. Cross-listed: Anthropology 372/Environmental Studies 372. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   375                              3 (crs.)

        Ecosocial Advocacy

        A critical analysis of various philosophies and forms of environmental and social advocacy, as well as a critical examination of case studies of activists and movements. Also includes practical training in skills needed for effective ecosocial change. Prerequisite: 30 credits or instructor's consent.

         

         

        Environmental Studies 380                               3 (crs.)

        Globalization 

        "Globalization" has become an all-encompassing term for describing a series of processes which are reshaping the society, economy, politics, culture and environment of the planet.  This course will introduce some of the main, often competing perspectives on globalization.  Through intensive readings and discussion, we will try to understand the ways in which the local and the global are increasingly intertwined, and to assess both the risks and the promises of the global society that lies ahead.  Cross-listed: Environmental Studies 380/Anthropology 380. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   388                             3 (crs.)

        Global Environmental Politics (SS)

        Examination of the role of environmental issues in international relations. We will look at such issues as global warming, global pollution, management of scarce resources and eco-development. How have various countries responded to these problems? How should they respond? What is the role of international institutions such as the World Bank? What is the role of non-governmental organizations such as Greenpeace? How have countries and international institutions interacted to deal with these environmental problems? Cross-listed with Political Science 388/Environmental Studies 388. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses. Prerequisite: Political Science 101 or 115 or Sociology 261 or Environmental Studies 261 or Political Science 261 or consent of instructor.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   390                              3 (crs.)

        Special Topics (SS)

        Special Topics courses in Environmental Studies focus on current environmental issues. The disciplinary approach and subject matter will vary. In keeping with the interdisciplinary nature of the Environmental Studies program, the scientific, social and ethical dimensions of the issue at hand will be explored. Students will normally be expected to carry out an original, interdisciplinary research project. Course repeatable once if topics are different. Special fees may apply.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   391                             3 (crs.)

        Special Topics in Environmental Science

        Various courses focusing on current environmental issues examined from a scientific perspective. The disciplinary approaches and subject matter will vary, but the course will be interdisciplinary and predominantly based in the natural sciences. Students will normally be expected to carry out an original, interdisciplinary research project. Course repeatable once if topics are different. See department. Prerequisites: Environmental Studies 260 or consent of instructor. Special fees may apply.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   395                             3 (crs.)

        Field Studies (SS)

        Field Studies courses involve intensive off-campus research focusing on specific environmental issues. The primary disciplinary approach and subject matter will vary. Each course will attend to the scientific, social and moral dimensions of the environmental issue under scrutiny. Cost for travel and related expenses will vary. Examples include: the study of pollution and politics in the Fox-Wolf watershed; the social ecology of Northern Minnesota's Boundary Waters Canoe Area; grassroots environmentalism, the Wise Use movement, and conflict over natural resources in North America; and efforts to construct ecologically sustainable livelihoods in the Highlands of Southern Mexico. Consult the appendix and contact the Environmental Studies program for course details. Special fees may apply.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   396                               3 (crs.)

        Field Studies in Environmental Science

        Field Studies courses involving intensive off-campus interdisciplinary research focusing on specific environmental issues. The primary disciplinary approaches and subject matter will vary, but this course approaches issues from the perspective of the natural sciences. Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 260 or consent of instructor. Special fees may apply.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   414                             3 (crs.)

        Bioregionalism

        This course critically examines the contemporary bioregional movement, bioregional movement, a complex phenomenon that focuses on intimately knowing one's local bioregion and living harmoniously with it. Bioregionalism includes the study of biogeography, practices such as community sustained agriculture and land trusts, and Utopian visions of an ideal, ecological society. Students will study Wisconsin's natural communities, local practices and bioregional social theory and philosophy. Includes a field trip.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   446                               1-3 (crs.)

        Independent Study

        See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement policies information for general course description, general prerequisites and proper contract form requirements.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   450                               3 (crs.)

        Environmental Management

        This course introduces the natural environment and social responsibility as components of the business decision-making process in addition to the traditional economic focus. Topics include Triple Bottom Line supply chain management, energy, transparency, design, life cycle assessment, reverse logistics, facilities management, marketing and strategy. Cross-listed Business 450/Environmental Studies 450. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   455                              3 (crs.)

        Environmental Communication

        This course is an exploration into the ways we define the environment and how language use influences our interactions with the environment. Cross-listed with Communication 455/Environmental Studies 455. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Communication 118 and 236 and 368 or Instructor Permission.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   456                               1-3 (crs.)

        Related Readings

        See Related Reading under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

         

         

        Environmental Studies   464                               3 (crs.)

        Sustainability Strategy and Innovation

        This course builds on the previous courses in the minor to synthesize how companies apply the core drivers and measures to implement sustainable initiatives and the cost/benefits of these activities. We will learn how to identify sustainable business opportunities while at the same time understanding the challenges of working in this dynamic and changing field. You will be part of a team working on applied business projects with regional organizations. Cross-listed with Business 464. Students may only receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: NOTE: For any student not admitted to the College of Business, the prerequisites to enroll in the upper level courses for this minor is 60 credits earned, 2.5 combined GPA and limit of six credits of upper-level business classes per semester. Business 464/Environmental Studies 464

         

         

        Environmental Studies   474                             1-6 (crs.)

        Honors Thesis

        Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study Contract) must show clear promise of honors-level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be "Honor Thesis".  Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty.  Prerequisites:  University Honors program and junior standing. Maximum of six units (crs.)

         

         

        Environmental Studies   490                              3 (crs.)

        Environmental Studies Senior Seminar (SS)

        A capstone seminar for the Environmental Studies program that will examine the student's ability to integrate perspectives gained in previous environmental studies courses emphasizing science, society and values. Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 260, 261, and 282, or consent of Environmental Studies Program Director.

         

        Document Actions