Course Offering(s)

1. Counselor Education

Counseling - Professional   101                        2 (crs.)

Introduction to Higher Education for First-Year Students

An introduction to the nature of higher education and a general orientation to the functions and resources of the University with the purpose of facilitating a positive adjustment to the first year of college. Students will explore the purposes of the General Education curriculum, develop an understanding of the teaching/learning process, learn to use campus resources effectively, engage in self-assessment and goal-setting, initiate a personal development plan, and learn effective behavior, time, and money management strategies. This course is intended for students in their first semester of college. Prerequisites: Limited to students who have earned 15 or fewer college credits. Students with more than 15 earned credits require department consent.

Counseling - Professional   201                        1 (crs.)

Academic and Career Exploration

This course is recommended for all students who are undecided about an academic program and career choice. Through the process of self-exploration, they will learn how to match personal interests and expectations with satisfying academic and career options. Students will assess themselves, research academic and career alternatives, and make decisions based on timely and factual information. Prerequisite: Less than 45 credits or Consent of instructor. Special fee: $15.00

Counseling - Professional   202                       1 (crs.)

Career Planning and Implementation

This course combines lecture, discussion and collaborative group work to assist a student in preparing for professional internship and professional work experiences. The focus is on self-understanding, implementing current career information, decision-making skills, forming an action plan, creating a resume/cover letter and developing interviewing skills. Students will also learn the importance of researching companies and how to conduct an effective job/internship search. Special fee: $30.00 

2. Educational Foundations

Educational Foundations   102                          2 (crs.)

Introduction to Education as a Career

This course is designed as an exploration of the profession of teaching and the foundations of our American Educational System. The material covered will include information for students who are considering teaching as a future career or for those who simply wish to learn more about key educational issues and policies. One component of the course will include class discussion seminar and the other component will be hands-on observational type field experience in local elementary, middle and possibly secondary schools. Prerequisites: A 3.25 GPA or an ACT score of 24 or above or placement in the top quarter of graduating class.

Educational Foundations   235                          3 (crs.)

Child and Adolescent Development (XS) (SS)

Principles, theories and methods of study of childhood and adolescence from prenatal development through graduation from high school. Physical, motor, cognitive, emotional, social and moral development are studied. Applications of knowledge to working with, nurturing and helping children and adolescents learn in educational settings are emphasized. Prerequisite: 2.75 GPA.

Educational Foundations   310                          2 (crs.)

Measurement and Evaluation in Education

Role of measurement and evaluation in educational decision making. Characteristics of acceptable measurement and evaluation procedures. Principles underlying utilization of commonly used standardized tests. Elementary statistical techniques used in the interpretation of test results. Constructing and using teacher-made tests. Methods of reporting student progress. Prerequisite: Admission I, Educational Foundations 280 or equivalent.

Educational Foundations   343                          3 (crs.)

The Adult Learner

The biological, psychological and social characteristics of the adult learner, including middle aged persons as well as those in later life. The intellectual abilities adults possess will be examined with specific references to educational processes. Prerequisite: Educational Foundations 235, 377 or equivalent. 343/543

Educational Foundations   350                          3 (crs.)

Adolescent Psychology

A study of pre-adolescence and adolescence as a psycho-socio-cultural phenomenon. Emphasis will be placed upon the basic conflicts and adjustment patterns of adolescents. Contemporary interests and problems of pre-adolescents and adolescents in school situations will be stressed. Prerequisite: Advanced standing including Psychology 201.  350/550

Educational Foundations   377                          3 (crs.)

Human Growth and Development

Study of theory and problems in the various areas of human development as interrelated phenomena. Psychological, social, emotional, intellectual and physical development from infancy to maturity. Environmental factors will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Psychology 201.

Educational Foundations   380                          3 (crs.)

Educational Psychology

The psychological study of the principles, theories and recent research findings of teaching that affect classroom procedures. Included in the field of educational psychology are: theories and conditions of learning; theory and practice of motivation of students; classroom management, individual differences, basic assessment and standardized testing. Emphasis in the broad concept of student diversity will be interwoven throughout the course. This course will build upon the fundamental understanding of cognitive, social/emotional and moral development from Educational Foundations 235. Prerequisite: Educational Foundations 235, Child and Adolescent Development, or Psychology 291, Developmental Psychology and 2.75 GPA.

Educational Foundations   381                          3 (crs.)

Honors: Educational Psychology

The psychological study of the principles, theories and recent research findings of teaching that affect classroom procedures. Included in the field of educational psychology are: theories and conditions of learning; theory and practice of motivation of students; classroom management, individual differences, basic assessment and standardized testing. Emphasis in the broad concept of student diversity will be interwoven throughout the course. This course will build upon the fundamental understanding of cognitive, social/emotional and moral development from the Child and Adolescent Development course (Educational Foundations 235). Prerequisites: Educational Foundations 235, Child and Adolescent Development or Psychology 291, Developmental Psychology. Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors Program with prior or concurrent enrollment in Honors 175. Students cannot earn credit in both an honors course and a non-honors course of the same title.

Educational Foundations   389                          3 (crs.)

Education of Gifted and Talented Students

Issues in identifying, motivating and providing for the learning of gifted and talented children and youth. Attention is given to creative processes taught on individual and group bases. 389/589

Educational Foundations   435                      2-3 (crs.)

Human Development and Education

Consideration of major theories, principles, problems, issues and recent research findings on human development. Physical, intellectual, social and personality development throughout the lifespan will be examined in the context of education. One emphasis will be on students' reflections of their own development and their observations of the development of others. A second emphasis, related to the first, is how these reflections and observations may contribute to the development of children and adolescents under their care as whole persons. Students may enroll for two or three credits at either the undergraduate or graduate level.  Prerequisite:  Bachelor's degree or consent of instructor.  435/635

Educational Foundations   471                      2-3 (crs.)

Learning Processes in Children

Reading and discussing a variety of new materials in the areas of early childhood learning and generating applications of research findings to working with children. Some areas discussed: learning in the newborn, learning to love and to fear, play, attitude conditioning, motivation for learning, self-concept development, Piaget, Montessori, cognitive growth, IQ change, approaches to teaching young children. Prerequisite: Educational Foundations 235 or equivalent. 471/671

Educational Foundations   474                      3-6 (crs.)

Honors Thesis

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study (e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment, research project, creative arts exhibit or production). A proposal, to be attached to the Honors Thesis Contract, must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty thesis supervisor and his/her department chair as well as the University Honors Program Director. Course title for transcript will be "Honors Thesis". Completed thesis will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Prerequisite: University Honors Program and junior standing.  Maximum of six units (crs.) 

Educational Foundations   496                      1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study
Supervised research or independent study in Educational Psychology. The outline of the student's proposal must be approved prior to registration. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and department chairperson.

3. Educational Leadership

Educational Leadership   205                            1 (crs.)

Introduction to Computers in Education

An introduction to the use of the microcomputer as a tool of instruction. The major emphasis is on computer awareness and developing student confidence in using the computer as a learning and teaching tool. Internet searching and productivity tools including word processing, electronic presentations and spreadsheets are explored.

Educational Leadership   302                           3 (crs.) 

Literature for Children

Literature for children aged three to twelve. Emphasis on: criteria for evaluation and aids for selection of materials; the reading interests, needs and abilities of children; and reading, listening and viewing guidance in the classroom and in school and public libraries. Prerequisite: Admission I.  302/502

Educational Leadership   303                            3 (crs.)

Literature for Young Adults

Criteria for evaluation and aids for selection of materials for young people aged thirteen to eighteen as well as extensive reading of the literature. Reading, listening and viewing guidance techniques appropriate for the classroom and for the school and public library. Prerequisite: Admission I. 303/503 

Educational Leadership   304                            3 (crs.)

Developing Information Literacy Skills

Preparing library media specialists to teach students information literacy skills (the ability to access, evaluate and use information from a variety of sources) through the study of the goals and methods of library/media instruction, and to integrate those skills into the curriculum.

Educational Leadership   308                            3 (crs.)

Multimedia Design and Production

Directed experiences including: utilizing digital still photography and manipulation of digital images; creating audio Podcasts; applying intermediate web design tools including frames and cascading style sheets; employing hypermedia authorizing environments in educational settings; and/or other emerging technologies. Prerequisites:  Successful completion of Educational Leadership 325/525 or equivalent technology class, or permission of instructor. Special course fees may apply. 308/508

Educational Leadership   317                            3 (crs.)

Classification and Cataloging

Theory and principles of library classification and cataloging. Practical problems in classifying by the Dewey Decimal system; use of International Standard Bibliographic Description ((SBD); creation of MARC (machine-readable cataloging) records, and Sears subject access.  317/517

Educational Leadership   325                            3 (crs.)

Instructional Technology

A basic course in the selection and utilization of media and computers in the teaching-learning process. Media technology is studied as a means of enhancing and improving learning. Prerequisite: Admission I for PEP students and Educational Leadership 205. Special course fees may apply. 325/525

Educational Leadership   329                            3 (crs.)

Collection Development and Reference Services

This course incorporates the principles and methods of evaluation and selection of print, non-print, reference and on-line library materials. Emphasis is on standard selection sources, building adequate collections of learning materials, developing selection policies and providing reference services. 329/529

Educational Leadership   334                            3 (crs.)

Administration of the School Media Center

Techniques of administering the multimedia instructional materials center in elementary and secondary schools. Problems in planning facilities, equipment, personnel, budgets, services; investigation of current standards. 334/534

Educational Leadership   358                            3 (crs.)

Multicultural Education Materials for Children and Adolescents

This course will introduce students to a variety of Multicultural books, non-print media and electronic databases for children and adolescents. It will prepare them to incorporate these materials into the curriculum of the K-12 classroom and into activities of the school media center. 358/558

Educational Leadership   375                         1-3 (crs.)

Current Issues in Technology/Media

A series of discussions on current trends, issues, problems and services in technology and media followed by class discussion. Theme will vary frequently. Course may be taken three times provided the subject of the course is not repeated. 375/575

Educational Leadership   403                            3 (crs.)

Foundations of the American School

Philosophical, socio-cultural and historical foundations of American education are explored through critical readings in theory and ideology. Historical and philosophical underpinnings of the creation of the modern American bureaucracy will be examined. Course requirements center on preparing students to understand the relationship of their personal educational philosophy to the larger educational system. Prerequisites: Admission I; 90 credits.

Educational Leadership   406                            3 (crs.)

Foundations of Multicultural Education

This course is designed to develop an understanding of cultural processes and sensitivity to diverse cultural groups. Emphasis is on the historical and social issues surrounding the need for good multicultural education, and how multicultural education should be used as a tool to an equal educational opportunity for all students. Students cannot receive credit for both Ed Found 409 and 406. Prerequisites: Admissions I; 90 credits.

Educational Leadership   407                            3 (crs.)

Education and Diverse Populations

This course deals with the educational needs of members of diverse populations (African-Americans, American Indians, Hispanic-Americans, Asian-Americans, disabled individuals, lower socio-economic and/or female persons) and related concerns they may face in the traditional educational settings. 407/607

Educational Leadership   408                            4 (crs.)

Foundations of American Education

This course explores the philosophical, social, legal and historical foundations of American education. The course focuses on contemporary and historical thoughts and issues in American education as they relate to the larger society. Course participants will engage in a critical study of the schooling system and social order and reflect on the legal and ethical obligations of teachers in a democratic society. Prerequisites: Admission I, 90 credits.

Educational Leadership   411                            3 (crs.)

Honors: Foundation of Multicultural Education

This course is designed to develop an understanding of cultural processes and sensitivity to diverse cultural groups. The course includes multicultural content as it relates to teaching, procedures for identifying various forms of bias in educational materials and teaching styles appropriate for culturally diverse learning styles. Students cannot receive credit for both Ed Found 409 and 406. Prerequisite: Admission I (Professional Education Program) and enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors program with prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175. Students cannot earn credit in both an honors and a non-honors course of the same title. (Educational Foundations 406 and Educational Foundations 409)

Educational Leadership   412                            3 (crs.)

Teaching as a Profession: Legal and Ethical Aspects

This course will introduce aspiring teachers to various aspects of the profession, including what a profession is and how it may be differentiated from other occupations. The structure and various roles of school systems will be explored. Significant ethical and legal issues regarding teachers and students will be examined through case studies and analyses. Prerequisite: Admission I.

Educational Leadership   420                            3 (crs.)

Learning and Leading in Cyberspace

Integration of the Internet into classrooms to promote student learning is the focus of this course. Topics covered will include: electronic communication, the Internet, search engines and online searching, information literacy, legal and ethical issues, hardware and software requirements, web page design and evaluation and development and delivery of instructional units which incorporate the Internet. Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 325/525 Instructional Technology, another technology class or consent of instructor. Special course fees may apply. 420/620

Educational Leadership   441                         1-3 (crs.)

Instructional Strategies

The course focuses upon such instructional strategies as developing appropriate objectives, developing creative thinking, exercises in deductive and inductive thinking, methods of effective questioning and techniques for clarifying values. The course is an introduction into the self-directed learning environment. 441/641

Educational Leadership   451                         1-3 (crs.)

Field Tour of Libraries

Field tours to famous libraries to enable students to explore history, organization, services and specialties of famous libraries in the U.S. or abroad. Each time the course is offered, it will involve libraries of a specific geographic area. (Offered in an interim when there is sufficient demand.) 451/651

Educational Leadership   474                         1-6 (crs.)

Honors: Thesis

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study Contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be "Honors Thesis". Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Prerequisite: University Honors program and junior standing. Maximum of six units (crs.). 

Educational Leadership   496                         1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study

An individual will conduct independent study to meet specific instructional needs not provided by current course requirements or offerings. Prerequisite: The outline of the student's proposal must be approved prior to registration.

4. Elementary Education

Elementary Education   110                               3 (crs.)

Education Policy: Lies, Damned Lies and Education (XS) (SS)

For more than three decades, public education policy in the United States has become a pervasive part of the public discussion. U.S. media is dominated by doom and gloom stories, and pessimistic assessments of U.S. students in international education rankings, and other failings of the U.S. public education system. This course will help learners scrutinize media accounts and public policy proposals for accuracy, bias and potential for effectiveness. By understanding how to critically examine a variety of claims, and learn about ways citizens can influence public policy, learners will have a better capacity to engage in community life.

Elementary Education   111                               3 (crs.)

Culture, Identity and Educational Journeys (XC) (ES) (HU)

Culture, Identity and Educational Journeys focuses on developing an understanding of culture in our lives, examine personal and group concepts of identity and make connections to diverse culture groups specifically those from refugee and immigrant backgrounds through the process of creating narratives of educational journeys.

Elementary Education   201                               3 (crs.)

Individual, School and Society

This is an introductory course in education. Its purpose is to expand your understanding of schooling through an analysis of its many connections with the individual and society. This, in part, will be accomplished through a study of social, political and economic forces in U.S. Society that have a direct bearing on schooling. Prerequisite: 2.75 GPA.

Elementary Education   300                               0 (crs.)

Bilingual Language Fluency Assessment

Registration for and completion of the Bilingual Language Fluency Assessment is required in the first or second semester of enrollment in the Bilingual Licensure Program and prior to enrolling in core courses in this program. 

Elementary Education   304                               2 (crs.)

Practicum in Early Childhood Education

This course requires students to spend 60 hours in an early childhood setting. Students will be involved in guided observation tasks in order to gain experience in observation and reflections on children's growth and development. Students will have the opportunity to practice and reflect upon knowledge and skills acquired in the early childhood block of courses. Prerequisites: Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or  201, and Educational Foundations 380, and Admission I. Elementary Education 304, Elementary Education 312, Elementary Education 313, Elementary Education 314, Elementary Education 318, Elementary Education 322 and Elementary Education 323 should be taken concurrently as an Early Childhood Education Block. Dual Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) majors choose either Elementary Education 304 or Special Education for the Early Childhood Education Block.

Elementary Education   311                               3 (crs.)

Teaching Languages Arts Pre K - 8

This course is planned for you to study teaching language arts, to provide practice using instructional materials and to learn about evaluation strategies likely to enhance communication of all learners. An integrated and constructivist approach to reading, writing, speaking, listening, language study and language diversity will be provided. Prerequisite: Educational Foundations 380 or Special Education 470 (may be taken concurrently) and Admission I.

Elementary Education   312                               2 (crs.)

Working With Infants and Toddlers and Their Families

This course examines relevant theories and practice pertaining to the care of infants and toddlers within the family setting and in group care programs. The relationship between best practices for care of infants and toddlers in community care and policies, which support them is considered as well. Students will design and evaluate curriculum activities appropriate for all children from birth to three years of age. Prerequisites: Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or  201, Educational Foundations 380, and Admission 1. Elementary Education 304, Elementary Education 312, Elementary Education 313, Elementary Education 314, Elementary Education 318, Elementary Education 322, and Elementary Education 323 should be taken concurrently as an Early Childhood Education Block.

Elementary Education   313                               2 (crs.)

Theories and Practices of Early Childhood Education

The needs and interests of children of preschool and kindergarten ages; the content of an activity program for the preschool and kindergarten. Emphasis on children's social, intellectual, physical and emotional needs with suggestions of interest area and activities, which lead into the subjects included in the curriculum for the primary grades. Prerequisites: Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or  201, Educational Foundations 380, and Admission I. Elementary Education 304, Elementary Education 312, Elementary Education 313, Elementary Education 314, Elementary Education 318, Elementary Education 322, and Elementary Education 323 should be taken concurrently as an Early Childhood Education Block.

Elementary Education   314                               2 (crs.)

Organization and Administration of Preschool Programs in Early Childhood Education

This course examines relevant theories and practices relating to the organization and management of quality early childhood education programs for children ages birth to eight. It is expected that participants will: 1) Develop an understanding of "quality early childhood education" and the values and attitudes necessary for this disposition; acquire an understanding of the steps involved in planning and implementing quality early childhood programs; 2) Acquire the knowledge and information necessary for administering early childhood programs; and 3) Develop specific skills and abilities necessary for successful administration of early childhood programs including: personnel management, business practices, health. Prerequisites: Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 380, and Admission I. Elementary Education 304, Elementary Education 312, Elementary Education 313, Elementary Education 314, Elementary Education 318, Elementary Education 322, and Elementary Education 323 should be taken concurrently as an Early Childhood Education Block. 314/514

Elementary Education   316                               3 (crs.)

Teaching Science and Environmental Education in the Elementary/Middle School

Provides the student with the knowledge of currently accepted goals of science and environmental education in the elementary/middle school. The examination, evaluation and practice of techniques compatible with these goals are emphasized, and contemporary elementary/middle school curricula are examined and evaluated. Prerequisite:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 380, Admission I, Elementary Ed 311 and Elementary Ed 384 and Educational Leadership 325. Special fee: $35.00

Elementary Education   317                              3 (crs.)

Teaching Social Studies Pre K - 8

This course is designed to study social studies teaching, to practice using instructional materials and to learn about evaluation strategies likely to enhance social studies knowledge construction and learning by early childhood, elementary and middle school pupils. It is also planned for students to study educational research and practice related to early childhood, elementary and middle level curriculum development in social studies. Emphasis is given to correlation with other school subjects. Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 380, Admission I, Elementary Ed 311 and Elementary Ed 384 and Educational Leadership 325.

Elementary Education   318                               2 (crs.)

Assessment in Early Childhood

This course is designed to address the theoretical and practical issues, practices and techniques that would guide practitioners toward the meaningful assessment of preschool children. The course includes preschool cognitive assessment, family assessment, preschool screening and intervention design. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 312, 313 and Educational Foundations 380 and Admission I.

Elementary Education   322                               2 (crs.)

Curriculum & Methods For Young Children: Art, Creative Dramatics, Creative Movement & Music

Introduction to curriculum and methods for using expressive arts and the characteristics of play to enhance the development and learning of the children in an early childhood educational setting. Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 380 and Admission I. Elementary Education 304, Elementary Education 312, Elementary Education 313, Elementary Education 314, Elementary Education 318, Elementary Education 322 and Elementary Education 323 should be taken concurrently as an Early Childhood Education Block.

Elementary Education   323                               2 (crs.)

Early Childhood Guidance and Behavior Management

This course is designed to help students understand the behavior and feelings of young children, learn how to understand and build positive behaviors and feelings, develop positive classroom environments for young children, and deal with their common behavioral and emotional problems particularly in classroom settings. Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 380, and Admission I. Elementary Education 304, Elementary Education 312, Elementary Education 313, Elementary Education 314, Elementary Education 318, Elementary Education 322 and Elementary Education 323 should be taken concurrently as an Early Childhood Education Block.

Elementary Education   330                               1 (crs.)

Teaching Foreign Languages in the Elementary School

Study and practice of basic theory, approaches and materials of teaching and learning a foreign language with special emphasis on the elementary school child and program. Prerequisite: Admission I. (Fall only)

Elementary Education   346                               3 (crs.)

Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language

In this course, we will review developments in second language theory and practice; explore ways to teach, and integrate, the skills or reading, writing, listening and speaking, both within ESL classes and in content-area instruction; survey a variety of approaches to ESL methods; discuss ways to focus on culture in language teaching, to create community among second language learners and to build bridges between schools and diverse linguistic and cultural communities; and address the needs of second language learner assessment and classroom management. Prerequisite: Admission I.

Elementary Education   348                               3 (crs.)

Principles of Bilingual/Bicultural Education

In this course, we will explore historical and political dimensions of bilingual/bicultural education, often from comparative perspectives; examine theoretical assumptions and recent research findings about learning through first and second languages; and discuss practical implications of critical theory and research for those who work with bilingual/bicultural children, adolescents, families and communities. 348/548

Elementary Education   349                               3 (crs.)

Content Area Instruction Bilingual Education

In this course, we will explore the theories, practices and possibilities for bilingual education across content areas. We will examine the teaching of content area subjects to bilingual children and adolescents in both bilingual (first language) classrooms as well as mainstream classrooms. Students will thus have the chance to prepare for content area teaching in English as well as Hmong or Spanish. Prerequisite: Elem/Sec Ed 346 Methods of Teaching ESL, Elem/Sec Ed 348, Principles of Bilingual/Bicultural Education, Elem/Sec Ed 352, ESL and Multicultural Materials and Admission 1. 349/549

Elementary Education   351                               3 (crs.)

Authentic Assessment for ESL/Bilingual Education

A seminar course relating to specific topics in the assessment of English language learners. The course will focus on developments in authentic placement, diagnostic and achievement language assessment, and the use of portfolio and performance assessment with English language learners. Various assessment tools (English and Spanish) will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Elementary Ed/Secondary Ed 346. 351/551

Elementary Education   352                               3 (crs.)

ESL and Multicultural Materials, Elementary/Secondary

In this course, we will review developments in second language theory and practice; explore ways to develop curriculum, and integrate the academic skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in content-area instruction; survey, and critically analyze, a variety of ESL and multicultural materials for elementary and secondary instruction; discuss ways to focus on culture in the curriculum and address ways to connect curriculum to second language learner assessment and instruction. 352/552

Elementary Education   353                               3 (crs.)

Hmong Language, Culture & Learning

Designed to familiarize educators and others with the language, culture and educational issues relevant to Hmong people in Wisconsin and the United States. Areas of exploration will include the nature of Hmong language, Hmong history, the traditional family and clan structure, child-rearing mores, healing practices, marriage and funeral practices and educational beliefs and practices. Contemporary developments and adjustment issues within the Hmong communities will be discussed, especially school achievements and challenges, intergenerational conflicts, youth gangs, and the need to provide high expectations and supportive educational environments for Hmong children, youth and families. Cross-listed: Elementary Education/Secondary Education 353.  353/553 

Elementary Education   354                               3 (crs.)

Fostering English Language Learner Achievement-Trial Course

This course is designed to give all teachers a working knowledge of how to foster success with an English language Learners (ELLs). In this course, we will explore historical, political and legal dimensions in the education of linguistic minority students in the USA; discuss practical implications of critical theory and research for those who work with bilingual/bicultural children, adolescents, families and communities; review developments in second language theory and practice; explore use of the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) to develop curriculum; integrate the academic skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in content area instruction; explore effective links between culture and curriculum; and connect curriculum standards to second language learner instruction and assessment.

Elementary Education   360                               3 (crs.)

Clinical Experiences in Teaching and Classroom Management

The course includes pre-student teaching experiences in elementary classrooms which provide students with opportunities for guided observations of teaching and classroom management strategies as well as planning, teaching and assessing lesson and unit plans in core academic subjects. Students must reflect on and learn from their teaching and assess their growth in meeting the ten Wisconsin teaching standards and aspects of the conceptual model of teachers as caring intellectuals. The concurrent seminar focuses on various approaches in building classroom community and a positive classroom climate, introducing different classroom management models and issues and dealing with such challenges as bullying and child abuse. Students complete Elementary Education 360 Clinical Experiences in Teaching and Classroom Management concurrently with Elementary Education 316 Teaching Science and Environmental Education in the Elementary and Middle School, Elementary Education 317 Teaching Social Studies PK-8 and Elementary Education 384 Teaching PK-8 Mathematics. Prerequisite: Admission I, Educational Foundations 380, Elementary Education 311, Reading 305, Educational Leadership 302 and Educational Leadership 325. (Pass/Fail course)

Elementary Education   375                               3 (crs.)

Teaching Writing PK-8

A process approach to writing will be utilized to help students learn to teach writing PK-8. This will be a multi-genre course including instruction in expository and narrative writing. Multicultural and gendered dimensions of writing will be explored and writing across the curriculum as an instructional model will be examined. Students will reflect on improving their own writing as they learn to teach writing to others. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 311 and Admission I.

Elementary Education   377                               3 (crs.)

Latino(a) Language, Culture and Learning

This course is designed to familiarize educators and others with historical, cultural and educational issues relevant to Latinos(as) in Wisconsin and the United States. Areas of exploration will include elements of surface and deep level culture, as well as historical perspectives on Pre-Columbian Latin America, the European conquest and contemporary Latino(a) experience. The role of ethnic pride as a factor in high-level student achievement will also be explored. Each of these areas will be explored in relation to the development of biculturalism/multiculturalism within the English-Spanish bilingual classroom. The class will be conducted in Spanish and all assignments will be completed in Spanish.

Elementary Education   384                               3 (crs.)

Teaching Mathematics Pre K - 8 Mathematics

The course is designed to study teaching, to practice using instructional materials and to learn about evaluation strategies likely to enhance mathematical knowledge construction and learning by early childhood, elementary and middle school pupils. It is also planned for students to study educational research and practice related to early childhood, elementary and middle level curriculum development in mathematics. Prerequisite: Educational Foundations 380 (may be taken concurrently), or Special Education 470 (may be taken concurrently), Admission I, Mathematics 110 and 211.

Elementary Education   400                          5-10 (crs.)

Student Teaching I

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences for student teachers under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   401                               5 (crs.)

Student Teaching II

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences for student teachers under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   404                               5 (crs.)

ESL Student Teaching

In this field experience, students will prepare and teach lessons, develop and modify materials for English language learners, reflect on learning and teaching, and show consideration and respect to both children and adults at school sites.

Elementary Education   405                           1-2 (crs.)

Seminar I

Students will integrate teaching-learning theories as they apply to situations  which occur in the classroom in which the student teacher or intern is working. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   406                              5 (crs.)

Bilingual Education/ESL Student Teaching

In this field experience, students will prepare and teach lessons, develop and modify materials for English language learners, reflect on learning and teaching, and show consideration and respect to both children and adults at school sites. Bilingual student teachers will prepare and teach lessons in two languages, and collect and modify materials for students in their first language.

Elementary Education   411                            2 (crs.)

Early Childhood Education

Designed to study the major early childhood theories and programs in the field and the various types of families and children served by these programs. The course will focus on analysis of teaching practices, current trends and decision-making in early childhood education. Students will engage in action research connecting the theory to the practice. Students will participate in professional/advocacy activities both for personal and professional growth for the benefit of children and families. Prerequisite: Education Foundations 235 or consent of instructor.

Elementary Education   412                               3 (crs.)

Understanding and Exploring Early Childhood Curriculum

This course addresses theoretical issues and provides practical experience for licensed elementary educators seeking an additional licensure at the preschool/kindergarten level. Students will receive theoretical information about child development specific to the age range of birth to six, and design instruction that includes developmentally appropriate practices in curriculum, materials and learning environments. Observation of an early childhood educator in a preschool setting is required. Students will understand the roles of educators and parents in relation to the children in an early childhood education program. This course is delivered through face-to-face and online instruction. Prerequisites: Admission to the Post Baccalaureate Add On Licensure Program.

Elementary Education   413                    3 (crs.)

Understand and Exploring Early Childhood Assessment

This course addresses theoretical issues and provides practical experience for licensed elementary educators seeking an additional licensure at the preschool/kindergarten level. Students will know and understand multiple influences on behavior, development and learning. Students will use positive relationships and supportive interactions as the foundation to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments. Preschool cognitive assessments, family assessments, preschool screening and intervention design are included in this course. This course is delivered through face-to-face and online instruction. Prerequisites: Admission to the Post Baccalaureate Add On Licensure Program.

Elementary Education   415                               3 (crs.)

Advanced Multidisciplinary Methods for Teaching

Students will examine multidisciplinary teaching methods, including integration of disciplines, multiple approaches to assessment and an evaluative inquiry process. Additionally, students will identify their content knowledge, attitudes and pedagogical strengths and weaknesses through ongoing self-assessments. Prerequisites: Admission to the Post Baccalaureate Add On Licensure Program.

Elementary Education   416                              3 (crs.)

Applied Multidisciplinary Methods for Teaching

Students will implement and reflect on two cycles of evaluative inquiry process, a multidisciplinary method for cultivating and sustaining the evaluation capacity of P-12 educators. By engaging teachers in an evaluative inquiry process, this course seeks to develop an evaluation culture designed to support new teachers in the continual examination of methods with the ultimate intent of improving educational opportunities for all students. The course emphasis on practice and application will feature samples of empirical work, as well as engagement with mixed methods inquiry. Prerequisites: Admission to the Post Baccalaureate Add On Licensure Program

Elementary Education   424                            3-5 (crs.)

Student Teaching Pre-Kindergarten

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences in pre-kindergarten classes under supervision.  Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   425                            3-5 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Kindergarten

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences in kindergarten under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   426                          5-10 (crs.)

Internship in Student Teaching

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences in an internship position under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   427                          5-10 (crs.)

Internship Elementary Education PK-6

Internship placement for students seeking PK-6 licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   452                               3 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Elementary Education PK-3/1-6/1-8

A student teaching experience for students wishing additional experiences related to teaching. Prerequisites: Admission to Student Teaching or Admission to the post-baccalaureate add-on licensure program.

Elementary Education   453                               5 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Middle/Junior High School

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences in middle/junior high school under supervision.  Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   454                            3-5 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Elementary Education

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences in grade one through grade six under supervision.  Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   455                              1 (crs.)

Preschool, Elementary School and Middle School Student Teaching Seminar

Students learn to apply principles of education to problems of discipline, selection of goals, and media for learning, guiding learning experiences and evaluation of outcomes, as these problems occur in the practical classroom situations in which the student teacher is working. This course must be taken in conjunction with student teaching. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   462                          5-10 (crs.)

Internship Elementary Education 1-8

Internship placement for students seeking 1-8 licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education   484                           3-5 (crs.)

Specialized Field Experience

Students will integrate teaching-learning theories as they apply to situations which occur in the classroom in which the student teacher is working. Prerequisite: Admission II. 

Elementary Education   496                            1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study
An independent study in Early Childhood/Elementary/Middle Level Education for students who would pursue in-depth a basic idea in early childhood, elementary and middle level education. Prerequisite: Outline of proposed study presented to elementary faculty member, the student's adviser, the Department Chairperson and the Associate Dean.  (See Department Chairperson first)

5. Health Education

Health Education   106                                       3 (crs.)

Personal Health and Wellness (GE) (XS) (SS)

Self-direction of health behavior. Mental health, drugs, disease and sexuality with emphasis upon the relationship of the individual to the community.

Health Education   211                                       3 (crs.)

Nutrition and Weight Control

A study of applied nutrition as it relates to body functions in health with parallel study of malnutrition. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   220                                       2 (crs.)

The School Health Program

An examination of the essential divisions of the school health program. Emphasis placed upon educational, environmental and health service functions desirable in the total school setting. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   221                                       1 (crs.)

Health Promotion Programs - History and Philosophy

A survey of the history and related philosophies of health promotion programs in both school and community health. Prerequisite:  Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   222                                       1 (crs.)

School Health Program: Curriculum Development

An examination of the essential divisions of the school health program. Emphasis is placed upon the development of a comprehensive school health education curriculum. Prerequisite:  Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   240                                       3 (crs.)

Human Sexuality (SS)

The study of human sexual functioning which will include social, political, biological, and aesthetic components and application of these components in developing a mature understanding of one's own sexuality and the responsible use of sex in one's life. Cross-listed: Health Education 240/Women's Studies 240. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

Health Education   250                                       3 (crs.)

Introduction to Health Education and Health Promotion

Designed to introduce students to the broad and challenging academic discipline and profession of health education and promotion. The background, philosophical and theoretical foundation of the profession will be covered. Theories of behavior change, the responsibilities and competencies of health promotion and education specialists and will investigate career opportunities in health promotion and education. Introduces professional organizations and certifications within the field of health education and promotion.

Health Education   301                                       1 (crs.)

Health Counseling and Appraisal

Designed to give the prospective teacher an insight into the purpose of health appraisals of school children, the use of health records in health counseling techniques in observing for deviations from normal, counseling with pupils, parents, and teachers, and how to make referrals to private and public agencies. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   305                                       2 (crs.)

Field Experiences in Health

Workshop course to emphasize use of available community resources in health education. Appropriate field trips scheduled. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   308                                       3 (crs.)

Instructional Strategies in Health

Examination of resource materials including texts, periodicals, pamphlets, audio visual aids and other contributions of agencies. Application of these materials to individual and group needs. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health only.

Health Education   310                                       3 (crs.)

Consumer Health

This course is designed to examine public health and disease prevention from a consumer/professional point of view and enable intelligent decision-making about how to obtain and use health related services, facilities, personnel and products. The cost, availability, quality of care, and the relationship to political, economics and social perspectives will be addressed. Identification of both the individual's and health promotion specialist's role with regard to accountability, responsibility and empowerment are an integral part of the course discussion. Prerequisite:  Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   315                                       3 (crs.)

Environmental Health

Emphasis on educational approaches to environmental and community health problems. The role of the teacher in fostering a consciousness concerning these problems on the world, national, state and local levels. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   401                                       2 (crs.)

Health Education in the Elementary School

Various phases of the school health program, concepts in health and elementary proficiency in emergency care procedures. Application of this information to the locality in which the teaching is to take place. Credit will not be given to Health Education minors. Prerequisite: Admission I; Education majors only.

Health Education   402                                       2 (crs.)

Seminar in Health Education

Problems in health education in regard to health services, health environment and health instruction. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   403                                       2 (crs.)

Seminar in Community Health Education

Survey and analysis of current community health programs. Emphasis is placed on the nature of contemporary health problems, communicable and noncommunicable diseases, epidemiology, and theories and practices of community and government health organizations. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   405                                       2 (crs.)

Health Issues of the Secondary School

A study of current health issues confronted by secondary students; understanding of health problems including emergency care procedures. This course should not be taken by School Health Education minors. Prerequisite: Admission I; Education majors only.

Health Education   410                                       3 (crs.)

Current Health Issues

An in-depth study of current critical issues in health. Emphasis on utilizing all resources available on each issue for classroom presentation. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   420                                       3 (crs.)

Issues in Mental and Emotional Health

The course will examine the relationship between emotional and mental well-being and the issues faced by today's youth. Some of these issues will be covered: bullying, suicide prevention, substance abuse, intentional and unintentional injury. The course will examine health promoting behaviors and strategies to enhance and promote emotional health and well-being. Prerequisite: Health Ed 106 

Health Education   440                                       2 (crs.)

Seminar in Death and Dying

An in-depth study of the anthological concerns with special emphasis on methods and materials of teaching the subject area. Development of appropriate knowledge, skills, attitudes and values which serve as fundamental bases for the teaching of death and dying. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   441                                       3 (crs.)

Behavior Modification and Program Planning

This course is designed to provide students with the foundation and skills to facilitate behavior change and conduct health promotion programs in the community and corporate settings.  Prerequisite: Health 250. (3+0)

Health Education   442                                       2 (crs.)

Emotional Abuse in the Workplace

Today, emotional abuse in the workplace has become an expectable form of harassment and violence. Millions of men and women of all ages, ethnic and racial backgrounds all across the United States experience emotional abuse in the workplace. This course will cover adult relational aggression, bullying and mobbing, laws surrounding harassment (other than sexual), conflict resolution and the personalities of individuals who are abusive in the workplace. Participants will learn self-care, prevention/confrontation methods and strategies for building workplaces free from undue stress, anxiety or fear from intimidation.

Health Education   446                                    1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites and proper contract form requirements. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   456                                    1-3 (crs.)

Related Readings

See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites and proper contract form requirements. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Health Education   474                                    1-6 (crs.)

Honors: Thesis

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be Honors Thesis. Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

6. Human Services

Human Services   111                                         3 (crs.)

Becoming a Person: Exploring the Self

A study of the individual in the environment, applying methods of psychology to understanding information provided by a review of the self. A description of various psychological models of personality, human learning, communications and coping is followed by application of the various models to data from participants.

Human Services   203                                         3 (crs.)

Introduction to Human Services

A survey course introducing the roles, functions, history and future of human service workers from a generic skills perspective. Provides opportunities for career exploration by initial field placement in the human services field. Prerequisite: Human Services major, minimum 2.5 GPA, minimum 56 units (crs) or department consent.

Human Services   310                                         3 (crs.)

Interpersonal Relations in the Helping Professions

Basic human services skills, including listening and interviewing, decision making and problem-solving strategies will be presented, discussed, demonstrated and practiced. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 203 and Human Services majors: Human Services 203 (may be taken concurrently).

Human Services   320                                         3 (crs.)

Human Behavior and Strategies For Intervention

This course presents a wide variety of theories and research findings. The theories cover both internal and external factors that influence human behavior. The main focus of the course is assessment in human services; that is, material is presented to help the student identify why people do what they do and to evaluate the strengths and deficits in an individual's development. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 203 and 310.

Human Services   325                                         3 (crs.)

Internship

Supervised experiences focusing upon human relations skills in human services. The student has the appropriate environment to observe, participate and integrate accepted practice in human services.  Prerequisites: Human Services 203, Human Services 310, a third Human Services core course (either 320, 335, or 340) for a total of nine units and Admission I.

Human Services   335                                         3 (crs.)

Globalization in Human Services

This course will examine the life chances and social welfare within a globalized political-economic context focusing on poverty and anti-poverty development programs worldwide, as the major theme of study. It describes the impact of U.S. political, military and corporate policy on other nations. Students will develop a sense of self-understanding and cross-cultural awareness based on respect for differing ways of life. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 203 and 310.

Human Services   340                                         3 (crs.)

Social Issues and Solutions in Human Services

This course focuses on social situational analysis and human service program planning by collecting information about identified social issues/problems, synthesizing it by using the logical framework analysis as a tool that can be used in all human service projects at all stages-from design through implementation, monitoring and evaluation of all human services programs, projects and other tools of advocacy. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 203 and 310.

Human Services   351                                         3 (crs.)

Task Group Strategies in Human Services

A study of the knowledge and skills involved in working with task groups within the human services. Specific strategies will be emphasized through experiential learning in the areas of observation, communication and problem solving. Prerequisites: Open only to students in the Human Services Certificate Program.

Human Services   353                                         3 (crs.)

Domestic Violence (SS)

The course will familiarize students with the problem of domestic violence. Special emphasis will be given to spouse abuse, the cycle of violence, alternatives available to the victim, legal options and counseling approaches used. Aspects of prevention, community intervention will be explored, along with the historical perspective and contributory factors such as sex-role stereotypes, social violence and cultural norms. Cross-listed: Human Services 353/ Women's Studies 353. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses.

Human Services   360                                         3 (crs.)

Program Evaluation and Grant Writing

Evaluation research is the process of using social science research methods to study, appraise and help improve programs in non-profit organization systems, governmental departments and businesses. Program Evaluation is an important component of strategic planning - working to improve the effectiveness of an organization. The ability to conduct an evaluation research will help to prepare you for leadership roles in the human services workplace. The ability to develop a Grant Proposal for program funding will provide you with opportunity to fund your proposed program plan. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 325. Completion of Human Services 340. Minimum GPA 2.5 Cumulative 2.75 major.

Human Services   375                                     1-3 (crs.)

Current Issues in Human Services

This course will consist of lectures, discussions and activities on current trends, issues, problems and services in the field of Human Services. Themes of the course number of credits will vary from one to three depending on specific issues/topics. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Human Services   376                                         3 (crs.)

Conflict Resolution in Human Services

Conflict can be the energy that drives creativity and innovation. Left unharnessed, it can lead to the unraveling of families, organizations and communities. This course addresses the methods and processes that facilitate the useful energy inherent in conflict and while promoting positive engagement and peaceful resolution. Students will learn the knowledge and skills to understand conflicts and theory-based strategies of intervention and resolution. Students will assess and develop their own conflict resolution style and develop knowledge and skills in: conflict theory, negotiation, mediation, group facilitation, advocacy and other third-party interventions. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Human Services   377                                         3 (crs.)

Family and Community Advocacy

Studies the knowledge and develops the skills for acquiring power for families and communities through advocacy processes. Skills include outreach, use of public and private records, interacting with agency staff, documenting and analyzing problems, use of census reports and state and federal statutes writing press releases, letters to the editor and networking with other activists. 377/577

Human Services   378                                         3 (crs.)

Refugees, Migration and Human Services

This course focuses on social situational analysis of migration including the causes, the ethical and legal issues involved, the impact upon individuals and refugee communities and the implications for human services. The course offers a comprehensive introduction to migration and human services, together with the option to focus broadly on related areas including human rights, refugee law, settlement and citizenship, gender matters, psychological and psycho-social issues, language, community and welfare concerns, theories of ethnicity, Diaspora and exile. The course places emphasis on the lived experience of refugees and of refugee communities. Drawing on students' personal contacts with refugees and refugee communities, the course aims to develop a fuller appreciation of refugee experiences, needs and achievements within a human services context. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Human Services   379                                         3 (crs.)

Crisis Intervention in Human Services

This course focuses on the situational analysis of crisis in clients and client group experiences, and the intervention necessary to mitigate such crisis situations. The course will offer a comprehensive introduction to crisis and crisis intervention as a human services response, together with the option to focus broadly on related situations of crisis including domestic abuse, suicide, disasters, trauma, kidnapping, grief and bereavement, serious illness and disability, workplace and schoolhouse violence, substance abuse, cults, critical incident stress, etc. These subjects are, of course, not inclusive of every possible critical incident where crisis intervention skills can be used. However, they cover some of the most common ones encountered within the venues of human services practice. The course will place emphasis on the lived experience of clients and client groups in which human services professionals may find themselves. The purpose is to provide a blending of empirically-based academic theory with practical, real world approaches on handling the most pressing and contemporary critical incidents in human services agencies today. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Human Services   385                                         3 (crs.)

Financial Sustainability in Nonprofit Organizations

This course is designed for students to develop knowledge and skills related to the diverse mix of funding streams that are necessary for the nonprofit to achieve sustainability. The course will cover the 501 (3) (c) reporting requirements, basic accounting information, marketing, investments, grants and other sources of income/support. The impact of economic trends will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment of Human Services 325.

Human Services   386                                     1-3 (crs.)

Psychology of Drug Use and Abuse (SS)

Surveys the psychological, sociological, medical and legal facets of the drug use and abuse problem as it affects our society today. Emphasizes societal pressures which contribute to the problem, personality characteristics of drug abusers, the drugs most commonly abused, and research upon those drugs. Examines the orthodox and unorthodox treatment and rehabilitation programs which are presently operating. Prerequisite: Six units (crs.) of Psychology to include Psychology 201 or 204. 386/586

Human Services   388                                         3 (crs.)

Community Sustainability and Human Service Principles & Applications

This course will put the word "Sustainability" spirit into the HSL program curriculum and human service practice. In human services, we are bent on improving the human conditions in our global community, particularly by listening and taking seriously minorities' voices in the "developed" world and women's and poor men's voices in "developing" countries.

This analysis of environmental problems is linked specifically to life chances, outcomes and, more generally, to quality of life and essential freedoms. The NOHSE code of ethics requires you as a human services professional, to advocate for the disadvantaged in your community, so that they have fair access to education for capacity building, healthcare and job training: racial, gender, sex-orientation and age equity; environmental risk reduction and protection from impoverishment. Advocacy for the disadvantaged is best through of not as a social goal in and of itself, but as inherently embedded in the pursuit of social justice. Therefore, your understanding of these environmental problems, your logical evaluation of society's responses to them and your ability to advocate for the disadvantaged in the execution of duty in your human services career, are important goals of this course. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Human Services   389                                         3 (crs.)

Multicultural Issues and Diversity in Human Services

This course is directed at helping students to broaden their knowledge of diverse cultures through experiential activities consisting of group discussions, interactive teamwork and individual ethnic self-identification exercises. The course also provides students with the tools for identifying and addressing diversity and how cultural belonging influences human services workers and consumers by examining the definitions and practices of multicultural approaches to human service practice and society. It considers National Organization of Human Services' multicultural expectations for and of students and practitioners. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Human Services   411                                         3 (crs.)

Laboratory in Human Services Program Planning

Simulations, laboratory exercises and experiential learning techniques are used to develop program planning and program management skills in human services settings. Prerequisite: Human Services 320, 340 and 360. 

Human Services   415                                         3 (crs.)

Legal and Ethical Aspects of Human Services

An introductory course providing an overview of the legal aspects in the field of human services and implications for the human services worker. Included are such topics as liability, confidentiality and privilege, records and rights of clients, due process and equal protection in terms of staff and clients, discrimination and witnessing. A unit on ethics will also be included. Prerequisite: Human Services and legal Studies Emphasis students only. Human Services Students: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 325.

Human Services   420                                         3 (crs.)

Advanced Internship

Supervised experiences which enable the student to observe, participate and integrate accepted practice in the field of human services. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 440 and Admission II. Concurrent enrollment in Human Services 420/421/422 is required.

Human Services   421                                         3 (crs.)

Advanced Internship

Supervised experiences which enable the student to observe, participate and integrate accepted practice in the field of human services. Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 440 and Admission II. Concurrent enrollment in Human Services 420/421/422 is required.

Human Services   422                                         1 (crs.)

Advanced Internship Seminar

This course is a seminar in which the student analyzes, integrates and evaluates his/her field experience. Discussion, readings and individual presentations are in the instructional methods. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 440 and Admission II. Concurrent enrollment in Human Services 420/421/422 is required.

Human Services   440                                         3 (crs.)

Leadership and Decision-Making in Nonprofit Organizations

This course will address theories, principles and practices of leadership in nonprofit organizations. Students will explore strategies and leadership styles unique to organization, gender and culture. Focus will be on understanding all facets of leadership as it relates to nonprofit organizations and their stakeholders. Economic decision-making will be addressed as it is related to growth and viability, as well as organizational decline. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 325. May be taken concurrent to Human Services 420/421/422, Major Field Experience.

Human Services   496                                     1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study

An independent study in the Human Services Program for students who would pursue in-depth an idea, process or belief related to human services. Prerequisite: The outline of the student's proposal must be approved prior to registration.

7. Physical Education

Physical Education   103                                    1 (crs.)

Jogging (PE)

This beginning jogging class is primarily concerned with improving cardiorespiratory function through jogging. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   105                                    2 (crs.)

The Active Lifestyle (PE)

A contemporary examination of the effects of lifestyle, wellness and health promotion on the individual. Instruction in procedures for self-evaluation, as well as an individualized exercise program for the development of health fitness. Participation in a planned program of aerobic activity is required. This course meets the two unit (cr.) physical education requirement.

Physical Education   107                                    1 (crs.)

Orientation to Physical Education

Physical education as a profession including professional preparation, scope and contemporary issues. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Physical Education   108                                    1 (crs.)

Yoga

This course involves learning poses and sequences for yoga, breathing techniques, benefits of poses and how to cue. It is a first course that will explore the benefits of yoga, props for yoga and modifications.

Physical Education   112                                    1 (crs.)

Racquetball (PE)

Development of the knowledge and skills of racquetball. One hour per week under instructor is required. Special fees may apply.

Physical Education   114                                    1 (crs.)

Backpacking

The objective of this course is to improve your knowledge and skills in backpacking, but more importantly to learn to backpack safely. The course will require a minimum of backpacking equipment (hiking shoes and a backpack of approximately 3,000 cubic inches) in order to enroll. Special fees may apply.

Physical Education   115                                    1 (crs.)

Fitness for Active Aging

This course introduces students to a variety of ways to instruct active older adults. Included will be floor aerobics, yoga and strength training.

Physical Education   120                                    1 (crs.)

Beginning Golf (PE)

Emphasis on equipment, fundamentals of grip and swing, putting, chipping and sand play. Special fees may apply. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   129                                    1 (crs.)

Square and Social Dance (PE)

Beginning square dance and introductory social dance skills including foxtrot, waltz, tango, cha-cha, swing and country. Special fees may apply. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   132                                    1 (crs.)

Beginning Judo (PE)

Introduction to the basic break fall, throwing and grappling skills and techniques in judo. Special fees may apply. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   133                                    1 (crs.)

Canoeing (PE)

Introduction to basic river canoeing skills and safety. Prerequisite: Intermediate swimming ability. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   135                                    1 (crs.)

Sailing (PE)

Introduction to basic safety, rigging and sailing of small boats. Prerequisite: Intermediate swimming ability. Special fees may apply. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   138                                    1 (crs.)

Beginning Badminton (PE)

Emphasis on stroke production and skill development in the basic fundamentals of badminton, as well as knowledge and understanding of the rules and strategies of the game. Special fees may apply. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   140                                    1 (crs.)

Beginning Bowling (PE)

Introduction to beginning bowling. Emphasis on basic skills, scoring, terminology, strategy, rules and etiquette. Special fees may apply. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   142                                    1 (crs.)

Volleyball (PE)

Power volleyball techniques. Stress on competitive rather than recreational aspects. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   143                                    1 (crs.)

Cycling

The purpose of this class is to teach students how to properly bike on off road trails, as well as on the road with and without a group. An emphasis will be placed on safety. Minimum equipment required will be a bike (preferably a mountain bike).

Physical Education   144                                    1 (crs.)

Beginning Tennis (PE)

Introduction to the basic fundamentals of tennis with emphasis on the forehand and backhand ground strokes as well as the basic serve and volley. Special fees may apply. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   145                                    1 (crs.)

Alpine Skiing and Snowboarding

The purpose of this class is to teach students how to properly ski and snowboard on groomed trails. An emphasis will be placed on safety. Students need to provide own equipment and are responsible for any lift ticket/user fees.

Physical Education   148                                    1 (crs.)

Nordic Skiing (PE)

Diagonal stride, skating, personal safety, physical principles of exercise, Telemark techniques and opportunities for participation in cross country skiing. Special fees may apply. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   154                                    1 (crs.)

Aqua Aerobics (PE)

Combining swimming movements and exercises into routines to music as a challenging and interesting way to develop a fitness program. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   163                                    1 (crs.)

Techniques of Scientific Relaxation (PE)

The practice of relaxation skills which permits the release of tension and stress saves energy and increases efficiency in daily pursuits. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   174                                    1 (crs.)

Aerobic Dance (PE)

A combination of routines that mold dance steps, exercises and locomotor movements into a challenging fun-filled physical fitness program. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   190                                    2 (crs.)

Movement Activities/PreK-2

Students will learn the critical elements of incorporating basic motor skills into creative activities. They will learn to teach lead-up games for nontraditional as well as traditional individual, dual and team sports. Included are games and activities using developmentally appropriate skills. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only.

Physical Education   191                                    2 (crs.)

Innovative Games and Lead-Up Activities

Students will become knowledgeable about the movement activities of PreK-2 children, their growth and development patterns, instructional methods, technological changes and developmental levels in young children. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only.

Physical Education   192                                    2 (crs.)

Outdoor Recreation and Leisure Activities

Students will learn how to implement outdoor activities as a part of the contemporary Physical Education PreK-12 teacher preparation curriculum. Included are hiking, backpacking, inline skating, climbing, skiing, camping, canoeing, snowshoeing, biking and archery.  Pedagogical knowledge and skills that go beyond traditional sport skills will be emphasized.  Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only. Special fees may apply.

Physical Education   193                                    2 (crs.)

Adventure, Challenge and Cooperative Activities in Physical Education

This course presents the concepts of adventure education including cooperative and leadership activities. The students will learn to use and implement a ropes course, climbing walls, orienteering and new games in the PreK-12 curriculum with diverse populations. Emphasis will be placed on the teaching and methodology of adventure theory. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only. Special fees may apply.

Physical Education   205                                    1 (crs.)

Mountaineering/Repelling (PE)

Methods and techniques in scaling and descending precipitous land forms, to include: climbing ropes and knots, body positions and holds, belays, repels, rope bridges, emergency evacuation and carriers. (Pass/Fail)

Physical Education   206                                    1 (crs.)

Orienteering (PE)

An introduction to the Olympic sport of Orienteering: involves navigating cross-country over unfamiliar terrain with map and compass in order to locate control markers in competition requiring speed, accuracy and mental decisiveness on the part of the competitor. Requires two Saturdays.

Physical Education   221                                 1-2 (crs.)

Swimming (PE)

Concentration on stroke development and safety in the water will be emphasized. Lifeguard certification is possible with successful completion of this course.  Special fees may apply.

Physical Education   224                                    3 (crs.)

PreK-12 Methods for Teaching Swimming and Adapted Aquatics

Methods and techniques in the teaching of swimming strokes to PreK-12 physical education students. Exposure to a variety of other aquatic activities included. Admission dependent upon passing a swimming test. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only. Special  fees may apply.

Physical Education   247                                    2 (crs.)

Coaching of Softball

The basic skills, rules and strategies of softball. Coaching techniques.

Physical Education   252                                    1 (crs.)

Volleyball Officiating

The discussion and application of rules and officiating techniques. The student will be required to officiate in class athletic programs.

Physical Education   261                                    2 (crs.)

Volleyball Coaching

Study of specific skills, coaching techniques, team selection, preparation, judging and conducting competitive techniques in the sport.

Physical Education   264                                    2 (crs.)

Tennis Coaching

Study of specific skills, coaching techniques, team selection, preparation, judging and conducting competitive techniques in the sport.

Physical Education   265                                    2 (crs.)

Coaching of Gymnastics

Study of specific skills, coaching techniques, team selection, preparation, judging and conducting competitive techniques in the sport.

Physical Education   266                                    3 (crs.)

Dance

Methods and techniques in teaching dance activities to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis. Exposure to a variety of traditional, folk and modern dance activities included. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only.

Physical Education   270                                    2 (crs.)

Physical Education for Elementary School

Introduction of physical education teaching methods appropriate for the elementary classroom teacher. Emphasis on: safety, supervision, equipment, basic principles, desired outcomes, program content and integration of physical activities in the elementary school curriculum. Prerequisite: Elementary education majors only.

Physical Education   279                                    2 (crs.)

PreK-12 Stunts and Tumbling

Students will learn the basic techniques of teaching stunts and tumbling, safety and spotting for PreK-12 students. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only.

Physical Education   290                                    3 (crs.)

The Child, The Teacher and Physical Education

Planning a developmental, sequential, comprehensive program of physical education for children. Emphasis on basic movement education: content and process. Integrating physical education in the elementary school curriculum. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only.

Physical Education   295                                    3 (crs.)

Class Management and Instruction in Physical Education

This class provides students with an introduction to class management and current instructional techniques used in physical education. Students will acquire and utilize knowledge of student characteristics, teaching methods and varied management skills when selecting activities for inclusion in the physical education program. Students will observe public school students and practice teaching with close supervision by university and public school teachers. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis who have completed Physical Education 190, 191, 192 and 193. (2+2)

Physical Education   304                                    2 (crs.)

Coaching Soccer Successfully

This course is designed to give aspiring coaches a foundation of successful coaching principles to build up on in the sport of soccer. Topics to include technical skills, coaching philosophy, periodization, weight management, strength training and risk management.

Physical Education   305                                    2 (crs.)

Coaching Wrestling Successfully

This course is designed to give aspiring coaches a foundation of successful coaching principles to build upon in the sport of wrestling. Topics to include technical stills, coaching philosophy, periodization, weight management, strength training and risk management.

Physical Education   306                                    2 (crs.)

Coaching of Football

A study of current trends, techniques and methods involved in the organization and development of an effective football program from a coaching standpoint.

Physical Education   307                                    2 (crs.)

Coaching of Basketball

A study of current trends, techniques and methods involved in the organization and development of an effective basketball program from a coaching standpoint.

Physical Education   308                                    2 (crs.)

Coaching of Baseball

A study of current trends, techniques and methods involved in the organization and development of an effective baseball program from a coaching standpoint.

Physical Education   309                                    2 (crs.)

Coaching Track and Field

Theory, fundamentals and techniques of coaching track and field. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Physical Education   310                                    2 (crs.)

Coaching Hockey Successfully

This course is designed to give aspiring coaches a foundation of successful coaching principles to build upon in the sport of hockey. Topics to include: coaching philosophy, strength training, risk management, communicating with your athletes and their parents, teaching and developing hockey skills, planning and conducting practices, evaluating performance and coaching during games.

Physical Education   320                                    3 (crs.)

Contemporary Issues in Coaching

This course is designed to acquaint prospective coaches with the issues associated with coaching youth in interscholastic athletic programs. Emphasis is on high school and middle school athletics. Topics include: athletics, emergency procedures, liability, motivation, human relations, public relations and minorities in athletics. (This course is a designated writing course. It will satisfy the writing course requirements in COLS.)

Physical Education   324                                    3 (crs.)

Dance II

Advanced skill acquisition, instructional methodology and what to include in a school dance curriculum. Prerequisite: Physical Education 266.

Physical Education   328                                    2 (crs.)

Officiating Team Sports

Fundamentals of officiating team sports, to include rules, mechanics, procedures and practical application.

Physical Education   340                                    3 (crs.)

Choreography

Advanced skill acquisition, choreographic knowledge, instructional methodology and what to include in a school curriculum and dance production. Prerequisites: Phy Ed 266 and 324 or dance vocabulary knowledge.

Physical Education   356                                    2 (crs.)

Internship in Adventure/Outdoor Education

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a hands-on experience in activities within the adventure education as well as the outdoor education curriculum.

Physical Education   360                                    2 (crs.)

Field Experience in Coaching

An individual approach to practical field experience in coaching middle school athletics (grades six through eight) under the supervision of a head coach. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only.

Physical Education   373                                    3 (crs.)

Adapted Physical Education

Adaptation of physical education activities based on the needs of students with disabilities. Attention to legislation, placement options and methods of teaching individuals with a variety of disabilities. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 348 and Physical Education 375. 373/573

Physical Education   374                                    2 (crs.)

Assessment and Prescription Techniques in Adapted Physical Education

Theory and practice in assessment, prescription and programming for individuals with disabilities. Prerequisites: Physical Education 373.  374/574

Physical Education   375                                    2 (crs.)

Lifespan Motor Development

Study of lifespan motor development from infancy through adulthood, including information on delayed development, psychological factors and the normal pattern of motor skill acquisition. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Physical Education   376                                    2 (crs.)

Sports for Individuals with Disabilities

Contemporary sports opportunities for individuals with disabilities, with application to teaching and transition planning. Prerequisites: Physical Education 373. Special fees may apply. 376/576

Physical Education   380                                    2 (crs.)

Adapted Aquatics

A course designed to provide the student with various alternatives in teaching techniques for beginning swimmers and the exceptional student. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education. Special fees may apply. 380/580

Physical Education   382                                    2 (crs.)

Coaching  of Swimming

Dry land exercises, conditioning and advanced techniques in all four competitive strokes.

Physical Education   390                                 1-3 (crs.)

Current Topics

Intensive and critical study of current topical issues in physical education or recreation chosen in advance by the instructor and/or the department. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Physical Education   392                                    3 (crs.)

Instructional Methods for Elementary School Physical Education

This course emphasizes instructional strategies in PreK-6 physical education. Included are:  PreK-12 developmentally appropriate activities, expected student performance, instructional analysis, equipment and materials and discussion of curriculum development in PreK-6 physical education. Note: This course must be taken prior to or concurrently with Secondary Education 370. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only who have completed Admission I.

Physical Education   393                                    3 (crs.)

Instructional Methods for Middle School Physical Education

This course emphasizes instructional strategies such as appropriate performance, instructional analysis, materials, including curriculum development, and the teaching of physical education in middle schools. Prerequisite: Physical Education 295 and Admission I. Special fees may apply.

Physical Education   394                                    3 (crs.)

Instructional Methods for High School Physical Education

This course emphasizes instructional strategies such as appropriate performance, instructional analysis, materials, including curriculum development and the teaching of physical education in secondary schools. Prerequisite: Physical Education 295 and Admission I. Special fees may apply.

Physical Education   395                                    3 (crs.)

Resistance Training and Functional Training for Physical Education Majors

This course will introduce the Physical Educator to the principles of Weight Training and Functional Training. Principles, theory, science and application of strength training, functional and flexibility training will be introduced. This course will cover safety, injury prevention and proper execution of the use of free weights, machines, bodyweight, flexibility and total body lifts taught in six through twelve Physical Education classes. Prerequisite: 20-211 Human Anatomy.

Physical Education   408                                    3 (crs.)

Field Experience in Coaching/Grades 9-12

An individual approach to practical field experience in coaching high school athletics (grades nine through twelve) under the supervision of a head coach. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only. 

Physical Education   421                                    3 (crs.)

Evaluation, Assessment and Technology for Physical Education and APE

Students will learn to use technology to aid in testing, evaluating and assessing PreK-12 physical education students. Students will have hands-on experience in a computer lab with up-to-date assessment software related to physical education. Students will learn to administer and assess commonly used motor skill, fitness and sport skill tests used in PreK-12 physical education. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only who have completed Admission I.

Physical Education   422                                    3 (crs.)

Physical Education and Sports for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Class content considers research, instructional programs and techniques in physical education for developmentally disabled individuals, such as the cognitively disabled, learning disabled and emotionally (behaviorally) disordered. 422/622

Physical Education   424                                    3 (crs.)

Physical Education and Sports for Individuals with Chronic & Permanent Physical Disability

Class content considers research, instructional programs and techniques in physical education for individuals with chronic and permanent physical disabilities based on indicators, limitations and needs. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education. 424/624

Physical Education   441                                    2 (crs.)

Organization and Administration of Physical Education

Organization and administration of physical education programs in the elementary and secondary schools including policy making, budget making, equipment purchases and programs of public relations. Prerequisite: Open to Physical Education majors in the PreK-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis only who have completed Admission I.

Physical Education   446                                 1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for proper information for proper contract form requirements.

Physical Education   456                                 1-3 (crs.)

Related Readings

See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites and proper contract form requirements.

Physical Education   460                                    1 (crs.)

History and Philosophy of Physical Education

Students will survey the history and related philosophies of physical education. Students will incorporate the concepts taught in prerequisite courses into a personal professional philosophy. Current issues, problems and trends in physical education are discussed. Each student will complete a multimedia project on the history of physical education. Prerequisite: Physical Education 392, 393 and 394.

Physical Education   472                                    2 (crs.)

PreK-12 Physical Education Curriculum

The nature and function of PreK-12 physical education will be discussed.  Students will discuss the concepts behind the development of dynamic physical education programs and develop a district wide PreK-12 physical education curriculum. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education.

Physical Education   481                                    3 (crs.)

Beach and Pool Administration

Community programs, private clubs, beach and pool maintenance, water chemistry, funding and scheduling. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education. 

Physical Education   482                                    3 (crs.)

Practicum in Adapted Physical Education

Supervised field experience with programs of physical education/activity for individuals with disabilities. This course is designed for individuals seeking the 860 Adapted Physical Education Licensure. All courses for Adapted Physical Education minor must be completed, or must have approval of the Coordinator of Adapted Physical Education Program. Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Human Kinetics & Health Education only.  482/682

8. Literacy and Language

Literacy and Language   305                          2-3 (crs.)

Foundations of Literacy in the Elementary School

Instructional strategies and materials are explored, as are various organizational patterns within the framework of balanced literacy. Word recognition, fluency and comprehension are major components. Phonics and decoding strategies along with meaning processing strategies are included with the focus on helping young readers become strategic and metacognitive. Literacy is viewed as a developmental process with promoting children's love of reading and time spent reading as crucial elements. Prerequisite: Admission I.

9. Reading Education

Reading Education   410                                    3 (crs.)

Assessing and Planning for Literacy Instruction

Provides pre-service teachers a contextually-set opportunity to employ assessment and instructional strategies. Decoding strategies that include phonics are covered along with strategies for the development of fluency and comprehension. Other literacy related aspects such as spelling and writing are included along with the importance of motivating children to read. A supervised field experience is arranged. Prerequisite: Reading Education 305 and Admission I. 410/610

Reading Education   412                                    3 (crs.)

Comprehensive Literacy Programs: Issues and Implications

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore in-depth issues and ideas related to school literacy programs influenced by current theories and beliefs. 412/612

Reading Education   420                                    3 (crs.)

Literacy and Language Development in Young Children

Prepares teachers of young children to understand language acquisition and emergent literacy. Focus is on developmentally appropriate practice in reading and writing including the use of sound-symbol relationships (phonics). The importance of the home-school partnership is also emphasized. Prerequisite: Reading Education 305 or Elementary Education 311 and Admission I. 420/620 (Fall)

Reading Education   435                                    4 (crs.)

Adolescent Literacy Methods

Historical perspectives, basic instructional techniques, approaches to problems in one's own instructional area, roles in and designs for a total school program, what research and authorities suggest and consideration of contemporary issues and concerns. Prerequisite: Admission I. 435/635

Reading Education   440                                    3 (crs.)

Literacy and Language in the Content Areas

Provides practical guidelines for elementary teachers to assist them in using reading, writing, speaking and listening as complementary learning processes for the content areas. Students in the course will develop a framework for empowering their own students to comprehend curricular materials. Students will have the opportunity to explore reading/writing strategies , processes and material that facilitate content area learning for diverse learners with varied learning styles. Prerequisites: Admission I and Reading 305. 

Reading Education   442                                   3 (crs.)

Literacy and Language in the Expressive Arts

A course designed for pre-service students who will be licensed in the expressive arts of PK-12 Art, Music, Physical Education and Foreign Language. Students in the course will develop a framework for empowering their own future students to comprehend curricular materials in their content areas. Students will have the opportunity to explore reading/writing strategies, processes and materials for the expressive arts that will facilitate content area teaching for diverse learners and learning styles. Prerequisite: Admission I.

Reading Education   453                                 1-3 (crs.)

Field Experience in the Teaching of Reading

Supervised Field Experience in the teaching of Reading (approximately 14 hrs. per credit). Prerequisite: Taken after completion of at least three of the following Reading courses required for the minor: Reading 305, 410, 420 and/or 440. (Fall) 

Reading Education   462                                    3 (crs.)

Managing a School Reading Program

The organization and management of effective reading in classrooms and schools. Procedures for planning, facilitating and maintaining a reading program. Prerequisite: Reading Education 305. (Spring)

Reading Education   470                                 1-3 (crs.)

Current Topics in Reading

Specific concerns related to the teaching of reading are considered. Each offering emphasizes a theme which focuses on current topics in reading, related research and practice. The course may be retaken provided the subject of the course is not repeated. Prerequisite: Minimum of six units (crs.) in Reading.

Reading Education   496                                 1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study

An individual conducting an independent study in reading pursues an area or topic related to reading not provided by course requirements or offerings. Prerequisite: Approved outline of student's proposal prior to registration.

10. Secondary Education

Secondary Education   110                                3 (crs.)

Education Policy: Lies, Damned Lies and Education (XS) (SS)

For more than three decades, public education policy in the United States has become a pervasive part of the public discussion. U.S. media is dominated by doom and gloom stories, and pessimistic assessments of U.S. students in international education rankings, and other failings of the U.S. public education system. This course will help learners scrutinize media accounts and public policy proposals for accuracy, bias and potential for effectiveness. By understanding how to critically examine a variety of claims, and learn about ways citizens can influence public policy learners will have a better capacity to engage in community life.

Secondary Education   111                                3 (crs.)

Culture, Identity and Educational Journeys (XC) (ES) (HU)

Culture, Identity and Educational Journeys focuses on developing an understanding of culture in our lives, examine personal and group concepts of identity, and make connections to diverse culture groups specifically those from refugee and immigrant backgrounds through the process of creating narratives of educational journeys.

Secondary Education   201                                3 (crs.)

Individual, School and Society

This is an introductory course in education. Its purpose is to expand your understanding of schooling through an analysis of its many connections with the individual and society. This, in part, will be accomplished through a study of social, political and economic forces in U.S. Society that have a direct bearing on schooling. Prerequisite: 2.75 GPA.

Secondary Education   300                                0 (crs.)

Bilingual Language Fluency Assessment

Registration for and completion of the Bilingual Language Fluency Assessment is required in the first or second semester of enrollment in the Bilingual Licensure Program and prior to enrolling in core courses in this program.

Secondary Education   335                                3 (crs.)

Teaching of English

By readings, demonstrations and practical experiences, the student learns to organize the materials and methods of the English curriculum into effective teaching procedures in the secondary classroom. Majors in English take concurrently with Clinical Experience. Prerequisite: Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, and Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission I.

Secondary Education   336                               3 (crs.)

Teaching of English II and Classroom Management

This course extends students' understanding of six through twelve teaching of English Language Arts and classroom management approaches and issues. The course provides learning opportunities for methodology and models, lesson planning, curriculum, technology and equity concerns. Content reflects the standards of the National Council of Teachers of English and the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Teaching Standards. Prerequisite: Admissions I and Secondary Education 335.  (Fall only)

Secondary Education   337                                3 (crs.)

Teaching of History and Social Studies

The differing points of view in the teaching of history and the social sciences and of the goals which parallel these differing points of view are examined. Consideration is given to selecting appropriate teaching methods and materials necessary to achieve the varied objectives of the social studies. Learning process is examined as it applies to the attainment of the objectives. Majors in History or other Social Sciences take concurrently with Clinical Experience. Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission I.

Secondary Education   338                                3 (crs.)

Teaching of Social Studies II

This course will strengthen the teaching of secondary social studies. Topics include standards for content, curriculum and assessment, as central to preparing skillful practitioners who are caring intellectuals. This course emphasizes constructing a social studies curriculum focusing on central ideas, content and depth. This course will enable students to conceptualize a "thinking" social studies curriculum. Classroom management and conflict resolution, use of computer-based technology, multicultural and global perspectives, integration of cross disciplinary ideas and content and school to work as it relates to social studies education will be addressed. Prerequisites: Admission I and Secondary Education 337.  (Fall only)

Secondary Education   339                                3 (crs.)

Teaching of Science

The student should be able to construct lesson plans which are usable, distinguish between methods of teaching which are effective and ineffective and demonstrate ability to perform in the capacity of a science teacher making acceptable use of the classroom and the laboratory. Should be able to name the most recent curricular developments in all the areas of science and demonstrate a thorough understanding of their underlying philosophies and their implications for instructional procedures.  Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission I.  (Fall)

Secondary Education   340                                3 (crs.)

Teaching of Science II

This course will provide the student with the opportunity to continue developing the pedagogical content knowledge necessary to teach science. The context for this will be the state and national standards, multicultural and gender equity issues, technology use in the classroom, and assessment. Majors in science take concurrently with Clinical Experience. Prerequisite: Admission I and Secondary Education 339.  (Spring only)

Secondary Education   341                                3 (crs.)

Teaching of Mathematics

The objectives, curriculum and teaching methods related to the courses in secondary school mathematics with emphasis upon trends, changes and investigations in the curriculum, and in teaching procedures. Majors in Mathematics take concurrently with Clinical Experience. Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission I. (Fall)

Secondary Education   342                                3 (crs.)

Teaching of Mathematics II

This course will provide six through twelve mathematics education students with the content and skills required to teach mathematics as envisioned by mathematics education organizations. Topics include secondary mathematics education in relation to technology management, conflict resolution, motivation, gender issues, equity issues, mathphobia, multicultural mathematics, school to work issues and mathematics education theory. This course will result in a more skillful teacher who will be better able to actualize the vision of what it means to empower students with mathematics and be a caring intellectual. Prerequisite: Admission I and Secondary Education 341. (Spring)

Secondary Education   346                                3 (crs.)

Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language

In this course, we will review developments in second language theory and practice; explore ways to teach, and integrate, the skills or reading, writing, listening and speaking, both within ESL classes and in content-area instruction; survey a variety of approaches to ESL methods; discuss ways to focus on culture in language teaching, to create community among second language learners and to build bridges between schools and diverse linguistic and cultural communities; and address the needs of second language learner assessment and classroom management. Prerequisite: Admission I.

Secondary Education   347                               3 (crs.)

The Teaching of Foreign Languages

The study of a modified audio-lingual approach emphasizing the teaching of basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing a modern foreign language. The intended outcome of the course is a familiarity with concepts of what language is and with language learning aims, theory and strategies. Majors in Foreign Languages take concurrently with Clinical Experience. Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission I.  (Fall only)

Secondary Education   348                                3 (crs.)

Principles of Bilingual/Bicultural Education

In this course, we will explore historical and political dimensions of bilingual/bicultural education, often from comparative perspectives; examine theoretical assumptions and recent research findings about learning through first and second languages; and discuss practical implications of critical theory and research for those who work with bilingual/bicultural children, adolescents, families and communities. 348/548

Secondary Education   349                               3 (crs.)

Content Area Instruction Bilingual Education

In this course, we will explore the theories, practices and possibilities for bilingual education across content areas. We will examine the teaching of content area subjects to bilingual children and adolescents in both bilingual (first language) classrooms as well as mainstream classrooms. Students will thus have the chance to prepare for content area teaching in English as well as Hmong or Spanish. Prerequisite: Elem/Sec Ed 346 Methods of Teaching ESL, Sec Ed 374 Clinical for ESL Secondary, Elem/Sec Ed 348 Principles of Bilingual/Bicultural Education, Elem/Sec Ed 352 ESL and Multicultural Materials and Admission 1. 349/549

Secondary Education   351                               3 (crs.)

Authentic Assessment for ESL/Bilingual Education

A seminar course relating to specific topics in the assessment of English language learners. The course will focus on developments in authentic placement, diagnostic and achievement language assessment, and the use of portfolio and performance assessment with English language learners. Various assessment tools (English and Spanish) will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Elementary Ed/Secondary Ed 346. 351/551

Secondary Education   352                                3 (crs.)

ESL and Multicultural Materials, Elementary/Secondary

In this course, we will review developments in second language theory and practice; explore ways to develop curriculum, and integrate the academic skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in content-area instruction; survey, and critically analyze, a variety of ESL and multicultural materials for elementary and secondary instruction; discuss ways to focus on culture in the curriculum and address ways to connect curriculum to second language learner assessment and instruction. 352/552

Secondary Education   353                                3 (crs.)

Hmong Language, Culture & Learning

Designed to familiarize educators and others with the language, culture and educational issues relevant to Hmong people in Wisconsin and the United States. Areas of exploration will include the nature of Hmong language, Hmong history, the traditional family and clan structure, child-rearing mores, healing practices, marriage and funeral practices and educational beliefs and practices. Contemporary developments and adjustment issues within the Hmong communities will be discussed, especially school achievements and challenges, intergenerational conflicts, youth gangs, and the need to provide high expectations and supportive educational environments for Hmong children, youth and families. Cross-listed: Elementary Education/Secondary Education 353.  353/553

Secondary Education   354                                3 (crs.)

Fostering English Language Learner Achievement-Trial Course

This course is designed to give all teachers a working knowledge of how to foster success with an English language Learners (ELLs). In this course, we will explore historical, political and legal dimensions in the education of linguistic minority students in the USA; discuss practical implications of critical theory and research for those who work with bilingual/bicultural children, adolescents, families and communities; review developments in second language theory and practice; explore use of the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) to develop curriculum; integrate the academic skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in content area instruction; explore effective links between culture and curriculum; and connect curriculum standards to second language learner instruction and assessment.

Secondary Education   356                                3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching English 6-12

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course.  Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Concurrent enrollment in Secondary Education 335 and Admission I. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. (Pass/Fail)

Secondary Education   357                                3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching History and Social Studies - 6-12

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course. Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380 and Admission I. Concurrent enrollment in Secondary Education 337.  Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. (Pass/Fail)

Secondary Education   358                               3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching Science 6-12

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice.  Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course.  Prerequisites: Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380 and Admission I. Concurrent enrollment in Secondary Education 340. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. (Pass/Fail) (Spring)

Secondary Education   359                               3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching Mathematics 6-12

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of 'pass" in this course.  Prerequisites: Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380 and Admission I. Concurrent enrollment in Secondary Education 341. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. (Pass/Fail) (Fall only)

Secondary Education   361                               3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching Foreign Language (6-12)

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course. Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Concurrent enrollment: Secondary Education 347. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. (Pass/Fail)

Secondary Education   362                               3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching Speech 6-12

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course and in Secondary Education 355. Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380 and Admission I. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. (Pass/Fail)

Secondary Education   366                             1-3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching Art K-12

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher and university faculty or staff, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. One credit of this course is to be taken concurrently with Art 253, 354 and 356 for a total of three credits. The level of responsibility and engagement will increase for each subsequent enrollment in the course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" for each completion of this course. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration with Art 253, 354 or 356. Open only to College of Education and Human Services art education students.  (Pass/Fail)

Secondary Education   367                                3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching Music K-12

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course.  Prerequisites: Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380 and Admission I.  Open only to College of Education and Human Services students.  (Pass/Fail)

Secondary Education   370                                3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching Physical Education K-12

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course. Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380 and Admission I and Physical Education 392 (may be taken concurrently). Open only to College of Education and Human Services students.  (Pass/Fail)

Secondary Education   371                                3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching Foreign Language K-12

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course.  Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380 and Admission I. Concurrent enrollment in Secondary Education 347 and Elementary Education 330.  Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. (Pass/Fail) (Fall only)

Secondary Education   372                                3 (crs.)

Clinical in Teaching Library Science K-12

Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course.  Prerequisites:  Elementary/Secondary Education 110 or 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380.  Open only to College of Education and Human Services students.  (Pass/Fail)

Secondary Education   374                                3 (crs.)

Clinical in English as a Second Language

The ESL clinical provides opportunities for students to engage in many aspects of ESL teaching prior to student teaching. While "learning by doing," this experience also provides students with the occasion to make connections between ESL theory and the "real world" of classrooms. Prerequisite: Admission I and concurrent with Secondary Education 346.

Secondary Education   377                                3 (crs.)

Latino(a) Language, Culture and Learning

This course is designed to familiarize educators and others with historical, cultural and educational issues relevant to Latinos(as) in Wisconsin and the United States. Areas of exploration will include elements of surface and deep level culture, as well as historical perspectives on Pre-Columbian Latin America, the European conquest, and contemporary Latino(a) experience. The role of ethnic pride as a factor in high-level student achievement will also be explored.  Each of these areas will be explored in relation to the development of biculturalism/multiculturalism within the English-Spanish bilingual classroom.  The class will be conducted in Spanish and all assignments will be completed in Spanish.

Secondary Education   400                           5-10 (crs.)

Student Teaching I

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences in middle school or high school under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   401                                5 (crs.)

Student Teaching II

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences for student teachers under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II

Secondary Education   402                                2 (crs.)

6-12/K-12 Student Teaching Seminar

Provides the opportunity to earn one additional unit (cr.) by pursuing independent study modules designed by the student and the university supervisor. Corequisite: This course or Secondary Education 455 or 465 must be taken in conjunction with Secondary Education 450, 451, 460, or 461. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   404                                5 (crs.)

ESL Student Teaching

In this field experience, students will prepare and teach lessons, develop and modify materials for English language learners, reflect on learning and teaching, and show consideration and respect to both children and adults at school sites.

Secondary Education   405                             1-2 (crs.)

Seminar I

Students will integrate teaching-learning theories as they apply to situations which occur in the classroom in which the student teacher or intern is working. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   406                                5 (crs.)

Bilingual Education/ESL Student Teaching

In this field experience, students will prepare and teach lessons, develop and modify materials for English language learners, reflect on learning and teaching, and show consideration and respect to both children and adults at school sites. Bilingual student teachers will prepare and teach lessons in two languages, and collect and modify materials for students in their first language.

Secondary Education   417                                5 (crs.)

Secondary General Music Methods, Pedagogy and Techniques

A hybrid course for music educators licensed in choral or instrumental music who are pursuing a license in general music. Participants will refine and demonstrate competencies associated with exceptional teaching in PK-12 general music. Progressive techniques for developing independent musicianship and music literacy along with integrated use of classroom instruments, the voice, piano, guitar and recorder will be practiced and assessed. Participants will receive instruction in authentic assessment, curriculum development and effective instruction through secondary content standards and the Wisconsin Teacher Educator Standards. Early childhood music, adaptive techniques for exceptional learners, student composition, technology integration, and classroom management in general music are also addressed. Prerequisites: Admission to the Post Baccalaureate Add On Licensure Program.

Secondary Education   426                           5-10 (crs.)

Internship in Student Teaching

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences in an internship position under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   432                             2-3 (crs.)

Middle School Education

Coverage of the goals, objectives and curriculum of the middle school/intermediate school. Explores the unique educational and social needs of boys and girls 10-15 years of age who are in grades five through nine. The nature of children in this age group is analyzed in terms of changing times and trends. Prerequisite: Admission I, Educational Foundations 235, Child and Adolescent Development, or equivalent and Educational Foundations 380, Educational Psychology.

Secondary Education   450                                5 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Middle Education

For students seeking secondary licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   451                                5 (crs.)

Student Teaching in High School

For students seeking secondary licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   452                           5-10 (crs.)

Internship Secondary Education 6-12

Internship placement for students seeking 6-12 licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   453                                3 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Secondary Education 6-12, PK-12

A student teaching experience for students wishing additional experiences related to teaching. Prerequisites: Admission to Student Teaching or admission to the post-baccalaureate add-on licensure program.

Secondary Education   454                                1 (crs.)

Students Teaching in Secondary Education (6-12)

A field-based course for teachers licensed in grades six through tweleve who are adding a new subject to their existing Broadfield Science, Broadfield Social Studies or Music license. Supervised observation, participation and teaching experiences. Prerequisites: Admission to the Post-Baccalaureate Add-On Licensure Program.

Secondary Education   455                                1 (crs.)

Seminar II

Designed to aid the student to integrate teaching-learning theories as applied to problems which occur in the classroom situation. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   460                                5 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Elementary and Secondary Education

For students seeking K-12 licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   461                                5 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Elementary and Secondary Education

For students seeking K-12 licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   462                           5-10 (crs.)

Internship Secondary Education PK-12

Internship placement for students seeking PK-12 licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   464                                1 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Secondary Education (K-12)

A field-based course for teachers licensed in a grades K-12 who are adding a new subject to their existing Broadfield Science, Broadfield Social Studies or Music License. Supervised observation, participation and teaching experiences. Prerequisites: Admission to the Post-Baccalaureate Add-On Licensure Program.

Secondary Education   465                                1 (crs.)

PK-12 Student Teaching Seminar

Designed to aid the student to integrate teaching-learning theories as applied to problems which occur in the classroom situation. Corequisite: Secondary Education 460 or Secondary Education 461 for K-12 licensure. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   484                             3-5 (crs.)

Specialized Field Experience

Students will integrate teaching-learning theories as they apply to situations which occur in the classroom in which the student teacher is working. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education   496                             1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study

An independent study in Secondary Education for students who would pursue in-depth an idea, process or belief related to secondary instruction. This course can be taken by upper division students. Prerequisite: Outline of proposed study presented to a secondary faculty member, the student's adviser, the Department Chairperson and the Associate Dean. (See Department Chairperson first)

11. Service Courses

Service Courses in Education                          0 (crs.)

Education 6

Open only to students who are not enrolled in another UW Oshkosh course. Assist students in completing non-credit program requirements in programs such as Alternative Careers in Teaching (act!) and the post-bac add-on licensure programs. Prerequisites: Admission to a COEHS program and permission from the students' COEHS program coordinator are required.

Service Courses in Education   410                 0 (crs.)

Career Planning in Education

This course is designed to provide the opportunity to draft and receive feedback on a professional resume document. Prerequisites: Admission to the Professional Education Program in the College of Education and Human Services.

Service Courses in Education   421              1-3 (crs.)

Contemporary Topics in Education

Focuses upon professional growth through problem solving, self expression, group thinking and independent study. Educators work on problems growing out of their professional needs. Course may be repeated with change of topic to a maximum of nine units (crs.). Prerequisite: A practicing professional educator. (Pass/Fail) 421/621

Service Courses in Education   422              1-3 (crs.)

Contemporary Issues in Education

The focus of this course is on professional growth and development via exploration of theory and practice related to current issues and educational initiatives. Courses may be repeated with change of topic to a maximum of nine units (crs.). 422/622

12. Special Education

Special Education    99                                       3 (crs.)

Direct Instruction Basic Algebra - Project Success

This course is designed to provide Project Success students who have successfully completed the Project Success summer transition program with additional skills in mathematical problem solving, knowledge of fundamental number properties and operations, use of the calculator as an aid to solving algebraic problems and reading of mathematical expressions. This course does not count toward the 128 units (crs.) necessary for graduation. Prerequisite: Project Success summer transition program and official acceptance into the Project Success program.

Special Education   100                                      3 (crs.)

Remediation of Specific Language Handicaps in Reading and Spelling

This course is designed to provide Project Success students with systematic drill with phonemes, affixes and roots. A systematic direct instructional approach is used to develop the ability to read and, therefore, comprehend college-level textbooks and materials. Similar drill is employed to teach spelling. In addition, syllabication for both reading and spelling purposes is also taught. This course does not apply for undergraduate degree credit. Open only to students in Project Success.

Special Education   101                                      1 (crs.)

Simultaneous Multi-Sensory Instructional Procedure Lab

The purpose of this lab is to provide Project Success students who have completed Special Education 100 with review and practice of the Simultaneous Multi-Sensory Instructional Procedures (SMSIP) that are used to decode and encode words. Students also learn and practice the use of SMSIP techniques with college level reading materials and written expression assignments. The lab will provide supervised faculty guidance for the Project Success students needing additional experience to efficiently perform the SMSIP techniques. This course may be taken twice. Unit (cr.) earned does not count toward university graduation requirements.

Special Education   352                                      3 (crs.)

Children and Youth with Disabilities in General Education

This course provides future educators an opportunity to examine the legal, theoretical and practical bases for inclusion. It is designed to provide a rigorous overview of current best practice in academic and behavioral methods for supporting students with disabilities in inclusive settings. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding high incidence disabilities such as specific learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disabilities, cognitive disabilities and speech/language impairments. Furthermore, positive approaches to and effective strategies for collaboration, accommodations and organization in an inclusive classroom are extensively covered. Prerequisite: 2.75 GPA. 352/552

Special Education   353                                      3 (crs.)

Collaborative Approaches to Teaching Students with Communication and Motor Needs

This course provides information about typical and atypical language, communication and motor development in students ages birth to 21 years. Course topics include typical language, communication and motor development; and characteristics of specific language, communication, and motor disorders. A focus that highlights the work of related service providers such as occupational, physical and speech therapies for individuals with disabilities serves as the contexts for the course. Recommended approaches that support individuals with communication and/or physical disabilities such as basic sign language, sensory integration, communication strategies, lifting and positioning, promoting student control and involvement in self-care, encouraging independence designing classrooms and physical access are explored. Prerequisite: 2.75 GPA.

Special Education   370                                      4 (crs.)

Practicum Experience in Special Education

A series of two four-week, full-day, supervised field placements within public school institutions which deal with students with disabilities, including learning and cognitive disabilities and emotional/behavioral disorders. This course is designed to provide students in special education the opportunity to observe classroom interactions, to participate in instructional planning, and to teach students on an individual, small group, and large group basis. This is the first of several pre-service teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission into Sophomore Practicum.

Special Education   372                                      2 (crs.)

Interim Practicum

An optional supervised field placement offered as an additional experience for students who have completed Special Education 370 (Sophomore Practicum), but need or want one extra placement. Open to College of Education and Human Services students only with consent of department chairperson.

Special Education   380                                      3 (crs.)

Inclusive Curriculum and Instruction

Students will be introduced to factors that influence curriculum content, scope and sequence, preparation and evaluation of curricular strategies, materials and environments. A major focus of this course will be extensive student involvement in curriculum planning and development, implementation and evaluation; in conjunction with state and national standards. Prerequisite: Special Education 353/553 (may be taken concurrently). 380/580

Special Education   381                                      3 (crs.)

Behavior Change and Management

Theoretical and practical understanding of methods used in modifying behavior in general, and problem behavior in particular. Methods of controlling behavior will be drawn from research and applied to the classroom. Approaches are developed to anticipate, inhibit, redirect and prevent problem behavior through techniques which have high probability of encouraging the total learning process. 381/581

Special Education   401                                      2 (crs.)

Advanced Practicum Experience in Special Education

This is a field-based experience where special education majors will directly work with children and youth with disabilities birth to age 21.  Special Education majors will receive experience in assessment and instructional remediation practices. Registration will be concurrent with a special education methods course. This field-based experience will occur within one or two terms prior to student teaching. Prerequisite: Spec Ed 480 or 413, Admission I. (Pass/Fail)

Special Education   406                                      3 (crs.)

Technology in Special Education

This course addresses assessment, evaluation, acquisition, implementation and appropriate use of technology across environments related to individuals with disabilities, such as assistive and adaptive technology, and alternative and augmentative communication. The course addresses Universal Design for Learning and strategies for building on students' strengths and abilities to enhance access to general education curriculum. The course addresses legal issues related to the provision of technology. Prerequisite: Sophomore practicum or equivalent coursework and Educational Leadership 325 and Admission I. 406/606

Special Education   412                                      3 (crs.)

Assessment and Curriculum in Early Intervention: Birth to Three

This course will address information necessary to prepare future early interventionists to work with young children ages birth to three years and their families. A family-based, inter-agency focused approach is outlined in current legislation. Special focus will be given to the unique features of birth to three service delivery models currently in place across the State of Wisconsin and the United States. This course is a required course in the Early Childhood Special Education Teacher Licensure sequence. It complements Assessment and Curriculum for Children with Disabilities Ages Three through Eight Years. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 311, Sophomore Practicum or equivalent coursework and PK3 requirements (Elementary Education 312,  313, 314 and 318) taken prior to or concurrently. 412/612

Special Education   413                                      3 (crs.)

Assessment and Curriculum for Children with Disabilities Ages Three to Eight Years

This course will focus on the best practices in assessment and curricula for young children with suspected or identified disabilities ages three through eight years. Issues related to service provision in preschool and early primary environments will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on linking assessment finding to intervention practices. Inter- and trans-disciplinary team models will be explored as a way to provide quality educational services to young children in the least restrictive environment. Methods to embed and monitor individual education plan goals in the daily routine will be discussed.  Information in this course complements content included in the "Assessment and Curriculum in Early Intervention: Birth to Three". Prerequisite: Elementary Education 311, Sophomore Practicum or equivalent coursework and PK3 requirements (Elementary Education 312,  313,  314 and 318) taken prior to or concurrently.  Fall only. 413/613

Special Education   414                                      3 (crs.)

Advocacy, Family Empowerment and Special Education Law

This course addresses three interrelated topics: (1) the role and responsibility of special education professionals to serve as advocates for students with disabilities and their families, (2) the skills and strategies needed by special education professionals to effectively support, collaborate with, and empower families of students with disabilities, and (3) special education legal issues. Further topics addressed in this course include school organizational and administration issues, collaborative consultation models, effective communication and professional ethics. Prerequisite: Admission I.

Special Education   418                                   1-2 (crs.)

Seminar in Early Childhood Special Education Teaching

This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching students in early childhood special education settings. Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed. The course is taken concurrently with Special Education 419. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching and Admission II.

Special Education   419                                 5-10 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Early Childhood Special Education

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences under supervision in a class of early childhood special education students. Prerequisite: Admission II, restricted to special education majors, and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 418.

Special Education   423                                      3 (crs.)

Direct Instruction Multi-sensory Methods for Teaching Decoding and Encoding

This course is designed to train individuals how to teach both decoding (reading) and encoding (spelling) to dyslexic students by means of direct instruction and appropriate practice strategies. Issues associated with dyslexia and related reading disabilities will be discussed. The emphasis will be on instruction that uses teaching methods to teach word meaning using the Simultaneous Multi-Sensory Paradigm. Additionally, the course is designed to meet the methodological needs of current and future teachers who work with or anticipate working with students who have difficulty learning to read and/or spell, whether they have been diagnosed as dyslexic or not. 423/623

Special Education   431                                      3 (crs.)

Transition to Adulthood

This course is designed to provide a rigorous overview of current best practice in assessment, curriculum, instruction and transition for students with learning and behavior problems in middle school and secondary settings. Course content will include the following topic areas as they relate to adolescents: legal issues and legislation, problems and issues, service delivery models, transition, academic and behavioral interventions, curricula and assessment. Prerequisite: Admission I 431/631

Special Education   456                                   1-3 (crs.)

Special Topics in Special Education

A course in topics of relevance for students having an interest or background in special education. May be repeated under different topics. SPEC ED 456/656

Special Education   463                                      3 (crs.)

Teaching Students with Significant Disabilities

This course examines functional curricula, instructional practices and functional behavioral assessment and support for students with severe disabilities. Additional topics include working collaboratively with related services personnel, the use of assistive technology in educational programming, supervising paraprofessionals in the classroom and teaching self-advocacy skills. Prerequisite: Admission I. 463/663

Special Education   465                                   1-2 (crs.)

Seminar in Teaching Individuals with Cognitive Disabilities

This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching mentally retarded/cognitively disabled students. Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed. The course is taken concurrently with Special Education 466. Prerequisite: Admission II. 465/665

Special Education   466                                 5-10 (crs.)

Student Teaching of Individuals with Cognitive Disabilities

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experience under supervision in a class for mentally retarded, cognitively disabled children. Restricted to special education majors. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Special Education   467                                   1-2 (crs.)

Seminar in Teaching Individuals with Learning Disabilities

This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching learning disabled students. Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed. Prerequisite: Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 468.

Special Education   468                                 5-10 (crs.)

Student Teaching of Individuals with Learning Disabilities

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experience under supervision in a class for children with learning disabilities. Prerequisite: Admission II. 468

Special Education   469                                      2 (crs.)

Field Experience in Special Education

This field experience is designed for emergency licensed special education teachers without any previous special education teaching experience. This experience allows the students to visit, observe and study several special education classrooms. Students must submit written observational reports of their classroom visits and prepare a program comparison/contrast paper. Registration is restricted to emergency licensed special education teachers who are unable to complete Special Education 370. (Pass/Fail)

Special Education   470                                      3 (crs.)

Fundamentals in Special Education Assessment

This course deals with the appropriate selection, administration and interpretation of assessment techniques and measures in order to identify students for special education. The course will familiarize the student with basic assessment terminologies and principles as well as various tests measuring achievement, aptitude, readiness and social skills. The emphasis of this course is on making eligibility rather than instructional planning decision-making. Prerequisite: PEP Admission I. 470/670

Special Education   471                                      3 (crs.)

Assessment for Instructional Planning in Special Education

This course provides students with hands-on experience in assessment procedures through observation, administration and interpretation of formal and informal assessment measures, including curriculum-based assessment. Students will write IEPs and plan instructional lessons with monitoring techniques. Prerequisite: Special Education 353/553 and Special Education 470/670 and Admission I. 471/671

Special Education   473                                      3 (crs.)

Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder

This introductory course will provide students with an understanding of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Students will be introduced to intervention strategies that enhance the communication and learning of students with ASD. Methods for teaching more conventional behaviors will be addressed. Issues surrounding diagnosis and support for families will be explored. 473/673

Special Education   474                                      3 (crs.)

Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Introduction to students with Autism Spectrum Disorder will provide students with information regarding methods of instructing and supporting children and youth with ASD. The course will include information regarding the best practices for assessment, instruction, communication, sensory, socialization, transition information related to children and youth with ASD. Prerequisites: Special Education 473/673 Introduction to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. 474/674

Special Education   475                                      1 (crs.)

Autism Spectrum Disorders Practicum

This practicum will provide students in the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Certificate Program experience 100 hours of working with students with ASD in educational settings. Prerequisite: Department Consent. 475/675

Special Education   480                                      3 (crs.)

Research-based Instructional Strategies

This course focuses on a variety of research-based strategies and methodologies for special education instructional practice. Topics covered will include principles of design, implementation and delivery of effective instructional interventions. Prerequisites: Sophomore Practicum or equivalent course work, Reading 305, Spec Education 470/670. This course should be taken in the last term prior to student teaching. 480/680

Special Education   481                                      3 (crs.)

Advanced Behavior Management and Instruction

This course builds upon effective behavior management and instruction concepts, principles and techniques covered in Special Education 381/581 and Special Education 480/680. Course emphasis is on understanding the process of behavioral change, instructional classroom management, self-management strategies, non-violent crisis intervention, social skills instruction, study and organizational skills and metacognitive strategies. In addition, this course focuses on conflict resolution, including resolving conflicts between pupils and between pupils and school staff and peer mediation. Prerequisite: Sophomore Practicum or equivalent coursework and Special Education 480/680 (may be taken concurrently) and Admission I. 481/681

Special Education   483                                   1-2 (crs.)

Seminar in Teaching Individuals with Emotional/ Behavioral Disorders

This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching emotionally/behaviorally disturbed students. Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed.  Prerequisite: Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 484.

Special Education   484                                 5-10 (crs.)

Student Teaching of Individuals with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences under supervision in a class of emotionally disturbed students. Prerequisite: Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 483.

Special Education   485                                   1-2 (crs.)

Seminar in Cross Categorical Special Education Teaching - Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence

This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching students in cross categorical special education programs (middle school through early adolescence) (students labeled as learning disabled, emotionally/behaviorally disordered, and/or mentally retarded/cognitively disabled). Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching and Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 486.

Special Education   486                                 5-10 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Cross Categorical Special Education - Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experience under supervision in cross categorical special education in a class at the middle childhood through early adolescence level (learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders, and/or mental retardation/cognitive disabilities). Prerequisite: Admission II, restricted to special education majors, and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 485

Special Education   487                                 1-10 (crs.)

Student Teaching Internship-CC Spec Ed Middle Childhood - Early Adolescence

Internship placement for students seeking cross categorical special education middle childhood through early adolescence licensure. Observation, participation and responsible teaching experience under supervision in cross categorical special education in a class at the middle childhood through early adolescence level (learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders, and/or mental retardation/cognitive disabilities). Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching and Admission II, restricted to special education majors, concurrent enrollment in Special Education 485.

Special Education   489                                   1-2 (crs.)

Seminar in Cross Categorical Special Education Teaching - Early Adolescence Through Adolescence

This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching students in cross categorical special education programs (early adolescence through adolescence) (students labeled as learning disabled, emotionally/behaviorally disordered, and/or mentally retarded/cognitively disabled). Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching and Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 490.

Special Education   490                                 5-10 (crs.)

Student Teaching in Cross Categorical Special Education - Early Adolescence Through Adolescence

Observation, participation and responsible teaching experience under supervision in a cross categorical special education class at the early adolescence through adolescence level (learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders, and/or mental retardation/cognitive disabilities). Prerequisite: Admission II, restricted to special education majors and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 489

Special Education   491                                 5-10 (crs.)

Student Teaching Internship-CC Spec Ed Early Adolescence Through Adolescence

Internship placement for students seeking cross categorical special education early adolescence through adolescence licensure. Observation, participation and responsible teaching experience under supervision in cross categorical special education in a class at the early adolescence through adolescence level (learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders, and/or mental retardation/cognitive disabilities). Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching and Admission II, restricted to special education majors, concurrent enrollment in Special Education 489.

Special Education   496                                   1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements. Permission of department chairperson required.

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