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Undergraduate Bulletin 2005-2007
Pre-Professional Education

 

Pre-Professional Education



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Pre-Chiropractic

Comprehensive information about a career as a Doctor of Chiropractic is available from the American Chiropractic Association at http://www.amerchiro.org (click on "What is chiropractic?"). The career path is generally as follows: (a) 3-4 years of undergraduate school (usually to the B.S. degree), (b) 4+ years of chiropractic school leading to the D.C. degree, (c) National Board exams, and (d) licensure to practice in a particular state.

Students may obtain excellent undergraduate preparation at UW Oshkosh by taking the appropriate coursework, which varies slightly depending upon the chiropractic school in question. The pre-chiropractic student must familiarize him- or herself with each chiropractic school's program, for best results. For a comprehensive list of accredited chiropractic schools in the United States, go to http://www.chirocolleges.org. Links to each school from there will provide detailed information about respective admissions requirements.

In January 2002, the Council for Chiropractic Education substantially altered the admissions standards for all accredited chiropractic schools operating in the United States. Full text of the changes may be found at http://www.cce-usa.org/January-2002-Standards.pdf. An overview of general requirements for admission are as follows:

1) Completion of at least 90 semester hour credits, to include at least 30 semester hours at the 300+ level (i.e. upper division). This works out to a minimum of 3 years of undergraduate education.

2) A GPA of at least 2.50 on a 4.00 scale. This GPA applies both to the required prerequisites (see next) and to the undergraduate cumulative career. In addition, there is a "C" minimum for required Biology, Chemistry, and Physics courses (see below). Only the most recent grades for any repeated courses will be used.

3) At least 48 semester hour credits from the following prerequisite list:

Chiropractic education includes intensive instruction in human anatomy and physiology. As a result, many pre-chiropractic students at UW Oshkosh elect to graduate with a major in Biology. Application to chiropractic school is generally made in the junior year.

Important note: Licensing regulations in each state may also have particular undergraduate requirements. What this means is that merely fulfilling the minimum requirements for admission to a particular chiropractic school does not necessarily guarantee you licensure to practice chiropractic just because you have earned the Doctor of Chiropractic degree. Licensure information can be obtained by calling 1-800-722-3648 and asking for the Institutional Planning & Research Department. Licensure details can also be obtained from admissions personnel at any chiropractic school.

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, Vaughan@uwosh.edu.

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Dentistry

Comprehensive information about a career as a Doctor of Dental Surgery (D.D.S.) is available from the American Dental Association at http://www.ada.org (click on "Education & Careers"). The career path is generally as follows: (a) 3-4 years of undergraduate school (usually to the B.S. degree), (b) successful completion of the DAT exam, (c) 4 years of dental school leading to the D.D.S. degree, (d) possibly 2 additional years of training in a dental subspecialty, (e) National Board exams, and (f) licensure to practice in a particular state.

Students may obtain excellent undergraduate preparation at UW Oshkosh by taking the appropriate coursework, which varies slightly depending upon the dental school in question. The pre-dental student must familiarize him or herself with each dental school's program, for best results. The only dental school in Wisconsin is located in Milwaukee; find complete details at http://www.dental.mu.edu. For a comprehensive list of the 50+ accredited dental schools in the US, go to:http://www.ada.org/prof/ed/programs/schools/index.html. Links to each school from there will provide detailed information about respective admissions requirements. Information about the DAT is found at http://www.ada.org/prof/ed/testing/dat.asp.

This exam is computerized, may be taken most days of the calendar year, and is normally scheduled for the fall of the junior undergraduate year.

An excellent resource for planning pre-dental education is found at the American Dental Education Association's web site, at http://www.adea.org. Prior to starting dental school, the successful applicant will generally have:

Completed at least 90 semester hour credits. This works out to a minimum of 3 years of undergraduate education. However, ~80% of dental students completed the Bachelor's degree prior to beginning dental school. Good scores on the DAT exam. A strong GPA, particularly in the following required prerequisites:

Additional credits in Biology (e.g. Bio 308, 316, 319) and Biochemistry (Chem 305) are recommended. Moreover, dental education includes intensive instruction in human anatomy and physiology. As a result, many pre-dental students at UW Oshkosh elect to graduate with a major in Biology. Application to dental school is generally made in the junior year.

It is strongly recommended that the pre-dental student plan for substantial volunteer or paid experience in a dental practice prior to making application to dental school.

Because dental school applications can be such lengthy documents, a centralized office called "AASDAS" handles them for you. You submit your materials once, to the AASDAS office, and then it distributes copies of your application to whichever dental schools you designate. More information on this service may be found at http://aadsas.adea.org//.

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, Vaughan@uwosh.edu.

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Engineering

Engineering professions include a variety of fields such as electrical, computer, mechanical, civil, mining, architectural, biomedical, environmental, industrial, chemical, geological, materials science, manufacturing, and nuclear.

Engineering Education:

Engineering programs in Wisconsin include:
University of Wisconsin Madison
University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
University of Wisconsin Platteville
University of Wisconsin Stout Marquette
University Milwaukee School of Engineering

Course suggestions for students attending UW engineering schools:
Required courses will vary depending on the school and engineering specialty selected. It is important that pre-engineering students meet regularly with pre-engineering advisors, and that they contact the school where they plan to complete the engineering program early in their college careers.

The following first semester courses are suggested, with exceptions to this schedule noted below:

* For most engineering fields, take Physics 109 and Math 171. For Chemical Engineering, take Chemistry 105 and Math 171.

** Start math sequence according to Placement Test results. Note that lower placement will delay taking Physics 109, which is calculus-based. If placed into Mathematics 104 or 108, it is best to take 108 or take 104 in Fall term and Mathematics 106 in January Interim (104 + 106 = 108) to progress through the math sequence more quickly.

*** Practical Arts 101 is required for all engineering programs at UW Platteville; industrial, civil and mechanical at UW Milwaukee; and agricultural, mechanical and engineering mechanics at UW Madison. Do not take 101 for electrical or materials engineering at UW Milwaukee or for electrical, materials, chemical, civil, geological, industrial, metallurgical, and nuclear at UW Madison. Instead substitute a social science or humanities elective. Economics 206 would be a good choice.

Of the four courses listed, Computer Science 221 may be taken later so the student substitutes a social science, humanities or English composition course. English 101 is required by both UW Platteville and UW Milwaukee. Students attending UW Madison must have taken it or tested out of it. Communication 111 is appropriate for all engineers attending UW Platteville, but only for electrical, civil and chemical engineers at UW Madison. It does not meet any requirement for other engineering specialties at UW Madison and is not needed for engineering at UW Milwaukee.

Sample Schedules: Exact courses depend on the engineering specialty and the university the student plans to attend later.

Mechanical Engineering:
Freshman Year

Term I     Term II    
Physics 109 5 cr. Physics 110 5 cr.
Mathematics 171 4 cr. Mathematics 172 4 cr.
Practical Arts 101 3 cr. Physics 201 3 cr.
Comp Sci 221 3 cr. English 101 5 cr.
OR General Elective
       
Total: 15 units (crs.) Total: 17 units (crs.)

Sophomore Year

Term I     Term II    
Mathematics 273 4 cr. Mathematics 301 3 cr.
Physics 206 4 cr. Mathematics 371 3 cr.
Chemistyr 105 5 cr. Physics 202 3 cr.
Elective xxx  3cr. Chemistry 106 5 cr.
Total: 16 units (crs.) Total: 14 units (crs.)

Chemical Engineering:
Freshman Year

Term I     Term II    
Chemistry 105 5 cr. Chemistry 106 5 cr.
Mathematics 171 4 cr. Mathematics 172 4 cr.
Comp Sci 221 3 cr. English 101 3 cr.
Elective xxx 3 cr. Elective xxx 3 cr.
Total: 15 units (crs.) Total: 15 units (crs.)

Sophomore Year

Term I     Term II    
Mathematics 273 4 cr. Physics 110 5 cr.
Physics 109 5 cr. Chemistry 335 4 cr.
Chemistry 235 4 cr. Chemistry 221 5 cr.
Elective xxx 3 cr. Elective xxx 3 cr.
Total: 16 units (crs.) Total: 17 units (crs.)

 

Electrical Engineering:
Freshman Year

Term I     Term II    
Mathematics 171 4 cr. Mathematics 172 4 cr.
Physics 109 5 cr. Physics 110 5 cr.
Comp Sci 221 3 cr. English 101 3 cr.
Economics 206 3 cr. Elective xxx 3-6 cr.
Total: 15 units (crs.) Total: 15-18 units (crs.)

Sophomore Year

Term I     Term II    
Mathematics 273 4 cr. Mathematics 371 3 cr.
Chemistry 105 5 cr. Mathematics 355 3 cr.
Physics 206 4 cr. Elective xxx 6 cr.
Total: 15 units (crs.) Total: 16 units (crs.)

 

Electives/Fall and Spring Interims: Electives (3 cr. each) are to be selected from social sciences and humanities. Most engineering programs, including mechanical and chemical, require 16-18 units (crs.) of liberal electives, roughly divided between these categories. Several schools require English 101 and Communication 111. Economics 206 and Psychology 101 are recommended choices from the social sciences. Interims provide an opportunity to complete some of these courses and to lighten the regular semester unit (cr.) load.

Mechanical engineering students who choose to take a lighter load in the freshmen year could take Computer Science 221 and English 101 at a later time.

Faculty Advisors:
Roy Knispel, Physics Department, 424-4431
Sandra Neuendorf, Chemistry Department, 424-7101

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Law

A Bachelor's degree is required for entrance to most American law schools, and the degree may be earned in any major a student chooses. There are no prescribed courses for admittance to law school, which is a three-year program. In Wisconsin, there are law schools at UW Madison and Marquette University. It is recommended that students contact those institutions for specifics about their programs.

A student planning to apply to law school should be aware to the following deadlines:

Additional Information: Programs
University of Wisconsin Law School
Admissions and Financial Aid
975 Bascom Hall
Madison, WI 543706-1399
Phone: 608-262-5914 |
E-mail: admissions@law.wisc.edu

Marquette University Law School
Office of Admissions
Sensenbrenner Hall 1103 W Wisconsin Ave
Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881
Phone: 414-288-6767
E-mail: law.admission@marquette.edu

Additional Information: Professional
American Bar Association
750 North Lake Shore Dr
Chicago, IL 60611
312-988-5000
Web Site: www.abanet.org

National Lawyers Association
Information Services City Center Square
PO Box 26005
Kansas City, MO 64196
1-800-471-2994
Web Site: www.nla.org

Faculty Advisor:
Martin Gruberg, Political Science, 424-0146

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Medicine

Comprehensive information about a career as a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) is available from the American Association of Medical Colleges at http://www.aamc.org (click on "Students & Applicants" to find "Tomorrow's Doctors"). Prospective students are also advised to consult the web site of the American Medical Student Association, at http://www.amsa.org.

The career path is generally as follows: (a) 4 years of undergraduate school (usually to the B.S. degree), (b) successful completion of the MCAT exam, (c) 4 years of medical school leading to the M.D. degree, (d) 2 or more years of training in a medical specialty, (e) passing of the National USMLE exams, and (f) licensure to practice in a particular state.

Students may obtain excellent undergraduate preparation at UW Oshkosh by taking the appropriate coursework, which varies slightly depending upon the medical school in question. The pre-medical student must familiarize him- or herself with each medical school's program, for best results. There are two medical schools in Wisconsin: in Milwaukee, the Medical College of Wisconsin (find complete details at http://www.mcw.edu/); in Madison, the UW Madison School of Medicine (find complete details at http://www.med.wisc.edu). For a comprehensive list of the accredited medical schools in the US, go to http://www.aamc.org/meded/medschls/start.htm.. Links to each school from there will provide detailed information about respective admissions requirements. Information about the MCAT is found at: http://www.aamc.org/stuapps/admiss/mcat/start.htm.

This exam is computerized and currently is offered ONLY in April and August. The MCAT is normally scheduled for the April of the junior undergraduate year. Prior to starting medical school, the successful applicant will generally have:

These courses can be fit into any major but because medical education includes intensive instruction in human anatomy and physiology, many pre-medical students at UW Oshkosh elect to graduate with a major in Biology. Additional credits in Biology (e.g. Bio 308, 316, 319, 323, and 343) and Biochemistry (Chem 305) are recommended for best performance on the MCAT, while at the same time broad liberal arts training is looked upon favorably by admissions committees. Application to medical school is generally made in the junior year. It is strongly recommended that the pre-medical student plan for substantial volunteer or paid experience in a health care practice or other human service activity prior to making application to medical school. A clean credit record is now often required for admission, as well. Because medical school applications can be such lengthy documents, the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS) handles them for you. You submit your materials once, to the AMCAS office, and then it distributes copies of your application to whichever medical schools you designate. More information on this service may be found at http://www.aamc.org/stuapps/admiss/amcas/start.htm.

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, Vaughan@uwosh.edu.

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Occupational Therapy

The occupational therapist is a health professional who aids people in acquiring and maintaining life tasks, which include motor skills, interpersonal skills, self-care abilities, work-related skills, and the use of leisure time. When these skills fail to develop or are limited due to illness or injury, occupational therapy may be utilized to train or restore some of these functional abilities.

Pre-occupational therapy students take some science courses along with a number of General Education courses. Accredited occupational therapy programs in Wisconsin are located at University of Wisconsin Madison, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Mount Mary College (Milwaukee) and Concordia University Wisconsin (Mequon). Both UW Madison and UW Milwaukee award Bachelor's degrees in occupational therapy as do Mount Mary and Concordia. Beginning in the fall of 1999, Concordia will offer an OT master's degree and will discontinue the undergraduate OT degree. UW La Crosse has a program and is in the development/accreditation process now.

Students beginning their course work at UW Oshkosh who plan to become occupational therapists should plan to transfer to one of the above programs after one year. This is important, as certain pre-professional courses are not available at UW Oshkosh. All students are encouraged to contact the school they will transfer to early in their college careers.

The following is a sample freshman year for those students planning to transfer to the UW Madison:

Freshman Year
Term I     Term II    
Biology* 105 4 cr. Biology 230 4 cr.
English 101 3 cr. English 2xx 3 cr.
Mathematics** 104 3 cr. Chem+ 101 or 105 4-5 cr.
Anthropology 232 3 cr. Statistics++   3 cr.
Psychology 101 3 cr.      
Total: 16 units (crs.) Total: 14-15 units (crs.)

* Biology 105 is a prerequisite for Biology 230 at Oshkosh, but otherwise is not required by Madison.
**Course taken depends on Math Placement Test. If not exempt from Mathematics 103, student would have to take this first.
+ Chemistry 101 may be appropriate if student has not had high school chemistry; otherwise select Chemistry 105.
++Choose from several courses including Mathematics 201, Psychology 203, and Sociology 181. Mathematics 107 is an appropriate statistics course only if the student has not yet taken math beyond Mathematics 103.

Pre-occupational therapy students planning to transfer to UW Milwaukee should contact the School of Allied Health Professions. During their freshman year at UW Oshkosh they should plan to complete courses, which will fulfill some of Milwaukee's distribution education requirements. These could include English 101,courses through Mathematics 104, two humanities courses, two natural science courses, Psychology 101, and Psychology 205 or Sociology 151. See an academic advisor for other pre-professional course suggestions.

Additional Information: Professional
American Occupational Therapy Association
4720 Montgomery Ln
PO Box 31220
Bethesda, MD 20824-1220
301-652-2682
Web Site: www.aota.org

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Optometry

Comprehensive information about a career as a Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) is available from the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry at http://www.opted.org. The FAQ link is particularly valuable. The career path is generally as follows: (a) 3-4 years of undergraduate school (usually to the B.S. degree), (b) successful completion of the OAT exam, (c) 4 years of optometry school leading to the O.D. degree, (d) passing of the board exams, and (e) licensure to practice in a particular state.

Students may obtain excellent undergraduate preparation at UW Oshkosh by taking the appropriate coursework, which varies slightly depending upon the optometry school in question. The pre-optometry student must familiarize him- or herself with each optometry school's program, for best results. There is no school of Optometry in Wisconsin but there are several in surrounding states.
For a comprehensive list of the accredited optometry schools in the US, go to http://www.opted.org/info_links.cfm. Links from there will provide detailed information about respective admissions requirements. Information about the OAT is found at: http://www.opted.org/info_oat.cfm. This exam is currently offered ONLY in February and October. The OAT is normally scheduled for the junior undergraduate year.

Prior to starting optometry school, the successful applicant will generally have:

Because optometry schools vary so widely in their prerequisite requirements, it is vital that pre-optometry students do careful research on prerequisites, which are listed in side-by-side fashion at http://www.opted.org/info_profile1.cfm. For example, many require a year of organic chemistry (235 + 335), while the remainder highly recommends it.These prerequisite courses can be fit into any major but, because optometry education includes intensive instruction in human anatomy and physiology, many pre-optometry students at UW Oshkosh elect to graduate with a major in Biology. Additional credits in Biology (e.g. Bio 308, 316, 319) and Biochemistry (Chem 305) are recommended for best performance on the OAT. Application to optometry school is generally made in the junior year.

Pre-optometry students are urged to seek volunteer or paid employment in order to demonstrate familiarity with the profession prior to applying to optometry school.

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine

Comprehensive information about a career as a Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) is available from the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine at http://www.aacom.org. There are many similarities between the M.D. and D.O. career. The career path is generally as follows: (a) 4 years of undergraduate school (usually to the B.S. degree), (b) successful completion of the MCAT exam, (c) 4 years of osteopathic medical school leading to the D.O. degree, (d) 2 or more years of training in a medical specialty, (e) passing of the National board exams, and (f) licensure to practice in a particular state.

Students may obtain excellent undergraduate preparation at UW Oshkosh by taking the appropriate coursework, which varies slightly depending upon the osteopathic medicine school in question. The pre-osteopathy student must familiarize him- or herself with each school's program, for best results. There are no schools of osteopathy in Wisconsin but several are found in surrounding states.
For a comprehensive list of the accredited osteopathic medical schools in the US, go to http://www.aacom.org/colleges. Links to each school from there will provide detailed information about respective admissions requirements. Information about the MCAT is found at: http://www.aamc.org/stuapps/admiss/mcat/start.htm.

This exam is computerized and currently is offered ONLY in April and August. The MCAT is normally scheduled for the April of the junior undergraduate year.

Prior to starting osteopathic medical school, the successful applicant will generally have:

Due to the slight variability in admissions criteria, pre-osteopathy students are urged to consult the side-by-side comparison found at http://www.aacom.org/home-applicants/index.html.

The prerequisite courses can be fit into any major but, because osteopathic education includes intensive instruction in human anatomy and physiology, many pre-osteopathic medical students at UW Oshkosh elect to graduate with a major in Biology. Additional credits in Biology (e.g. Bio 308, 316, 319, 323, and 343) and Biochemistry (Chem 305) are recommended for best performance on the MCAT, while at the same time broad liberal arts training is looked upon favorably by admissions committees.

Application to osteopathic medical school is generally made in the junior year.

It is strongly recommended that the pre-osteopathy student plan for substantial volunteer or paid experience in a health care practice or other human service activity prior to making application to osteopathic medical school. Familiarity with osteopathy in particular is a plus.

Because osteopathic medical school applications can be such lengthy documents, the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS) handles them for you. You submit your materials once, to the AACOMAS office, and then it distributes copies of your application to whichever schools you designate. More information on this service may be found at http://www.aacom.org/home-applicants/index.html.

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076 vaughan@uwosh.edu

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Pharmacy

Becoming a pharmacist usually requires six years of study: two years in pre-professional study at a school like the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and four years at a pharmacy school. The pharmacy school in Wisconsin is at the University of Wisconsin Madison.

The following program of study will fulfill the pre-pharmacy requirements of the University of Wisconsin Pharmacy School. Students must have a minimum of 70 units (crs.) to enter the Pharmacy program. This may require interim or summer courses and could take more than two years depending on math placement.

Freshman Year

Term I     Term II    
Biology* 105 4 cr. Biology 230 4 cr.
Math** 108 5 cr. Math 171 4 cr.
Chemistry 105 5 cr. Chemistry 106 5 cr.
English 101 3 cr. Psychology 101 3 cr.
Electives xxx 3 cr.      
Total: 20 units (crs.) Total: 16 units (crs.)

Sophomore

Term I     Term II    
Chemistry 235 4 cr. Chemistry 335 4 cr.
Physics 107 or 109 5 cr. Physics 108 or 110 5 cr.
Economics 206 3 cr. Biology+ 323 or 231 or 308 3-5 cr.
Anthropology ++ 232 3 cr. English xxx 3 cr.
Social Science or Elective xxx 3 cr.      
Total: 18 units (crs.) Total: 15-17 units (crs.)

*Biology 105 is a prerequisite for all biology classes listed above.
**The mathematics course a student takes depends on the Placement Test results. Mathematics through calculus is required for admission to pharmacy school.
+Biology 323 is preferred.
++An ethnic studies course is required and counts as a social science as well as an ethnic studies course. Humanities and social science courses (psychology, sociology, history, economics) may be available during interims and/or summer sessions. As mentioned above, completion of the required course work may take longer than two years, depending on math placement and number of units taken each semester.

Faculty Advisor:
Charles Gibson, Chemistry, 424-1400

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Physical Therapy

The profession of physical therapy serves individuals whose ability to function has been impaired by disease or injury. Physical therapy programs in Wisconsin are located at the UW Madison, UW La Crosse, UW Milwaukee, Concordia University, and Marquette University. Each of these universities awards a Master's degree in physical therapy.

A Bachelor's degree is required of students applying for admission to one of these Master's degree programs. Since some of the prerequisite courses for the Master's program can be completed while earning a Bachelor's degree at the universities listed above, students enrolled at the UW Oshkosh should transfer to a school having a physical therapy program after one year of course work. Students should contact the school where they will complete their undergraduate degree early in the first term of their freshman year.

The following are suggested first year classes for those students who will be transferring to either the UW Madison or the UW La Crosse.

Additional Information: Professional
American Physical Therapy Association
1111 N Fairfax St
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-684-APTA
Web Site: www.apta.org

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu

Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Physician's Assistant

Comprehensive information about a career as a Physician Assistant (P.A.) is available from the Association of Physician Assistant Programs at http://www.apap.org. Prospective students are also advised to consult the web site of the Student Academy of the American Academy of Physician Assistants at http://www.saaapa.aapa.org.

The career path is generally as follows: (a) 4 years of undergraduate school (usually to the B.S. degree), (b) successful completion of the Graduate Record Exam, (c) 2-3 years of PA school leading to the P.A. degree, (d) possibly 2 or more years of training in a medical specialty, (e) passing of the National board exams, and (f) licensure to practice in a particular state. However, there is considerable variation in the career path so students should check with each PA program that is of interest (including those located in Wisconsin).

Students may obtain excellent undergraduate preparation at UW Oshkosh by taking the appropriate coursework, which varies slightly depending upon the PA school in question. The pre-PA student must familiarize him or herself with each PA school's program, for best results.

For a comprehensive list of the accredited PA schools in the US, go to http://www.aapa.org/pgmlist.php3. about respective admissions requirements.

Links to each school from there will provide detailed information. There are three PA schools in Wisconsin: in Milwaukee, at Marquette University (see http://www.marquette.edu/chs/pa/index.html); at the UW Madison campus (see http://www.wisc.edu/pubs/ug/11medical/phyass.html); and at the UW La Crosse campus (see http://perth.uwlax.edu/pastudies). Information about the GRE is found at: http://www.gre.org. This exam is computerized and is offered most days of the year. The GRE is normally scheduled for the junior undergraduate year. Prior to starting PA school, the successful applicant will generally have:

These courses can be fit into any major but, because PA education includes intensive instruction in human anatomy and physiology, many pre-PA students at UW Oshkosh elect to graduate with a major in Biology. Additional credits in Biology (e.g. Bio 308, 316, 319) and Biochemistry (Chem 305) are recommended for best performance on the GRE, while at the same time broad liberal arts training is looked upon favorably by admissions committees. Application to PA school is generally made in the junior year.

Eligibility for admission to PA school involves strict requirements about patient care experience. The number of hours that must be documented is specified by each school and can vary. Thus, the pre-PA student must plan for substantial volunteer or paid experience in a health care practice or other human service activity prior to making application to PA school. Because PA school applications can be such lengthy documents, the Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA) handles them for you. You submit your materials once, to the CASPA office, and then it distributes copies of your application to whichever PA schools you designate. More information on this service may be found at http://www.caspaonline.org.

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Podiatry

The field of podiatric medicine is an area of medicine, which is concerned with prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and disorders affecting the human foot and its related structures.

Acceptance into one of the seven colleges of podiatry is very competitive. The pre-podiatry student will need excellent grades and will also have to score well on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), which is required before application. All colleges of podiatry require that a minimum of 90 term hours be completed at the time of enrollment. Recent statistics show most entering students have obtained the Bachelor's degree prior to entering podiatry school. Colleges of podiatry generally require the following courses as the minimum for acceptance into their program:

Additional courses in advanced biology as well as social sciences, humanities and mathematics are highly recommended. Please see an advisor for assistance in selecting courses. Also, students are strongly encouraged to contact the podiatry school they plan to attend for information regarding that school's specific requirements.

Additional Information: Professional
American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine
1350 Piccard Dr Ste 322
Rockville, MD 20850
301-984-9350 or 1-800-922-9266
Web Site: www.aacpm.org

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268

Pre-Veterinary

Veterinarians work in small and/or large animal practices, public health agencies, research settings, and a variety of other positions. While two years of pre-veterinary study are the absolute minimum, some veterinary medical colleges give priority to applicants if they are a candidate for the baccalaureate degree.

Acceptance into one of the 27 veterinary medical schools in the United States is extremely competitive. The student will need very high grades and should score well on the admission test required by the school. Veterinary medical schools require four years of professional training in order to receive the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree (D.V.M.) In Wisconsin, the veterinary medical school is located at the UW Madison. The following are suggested courses for a student in the pre-veterinary program who ultimately plans to attend the UW Madison.

Additional Information: Programs
University of Wisconsin Madison
School of veterinary medicine
Office of Academic Affairs
2015 Linden Dr W
Madison, WI 53706-1102
608-263-2525
Web Site: www.vetmed.wisc.edu.oaa/oaa.html

Additional Information: Professional
American Veterinary Medical Association
1931 N Mecham Rd Ste100
Schaumberg, IL 60173
847-925-8070
Web Site: www.avma.org

Faculty Advisor:
Colleen McDermott , Biology, 424-1102

Academic Advisors:
Ron Cardo, cardo@uwosh.edu
Erin Finnel, finnel@uwosh.edu
Dempsey 130, (920) 424-1268