UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN OSHKOSH

PRE-PROFESSIONAL
EDUCATION



University of Wisconsin Oshkosh offers opportunities for students to obtain pre-professional training in most of the major professional fields. The student will enroll in courses that are required by the appropriate professional school and then transfer to that school for the professional training required in such areas as dentistry, engineering, law, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy and many others. In some areas such as law and medicine, students complete the baccalaureate degree before being admitted to a professional school. Other pre-professional programs provide the first, second or third year of study for students who will then transfer to a professional school.

The following summaries cover some of the more popular pre-professional interests of the students enrolled in pre-professional studies.

Gary Simonsen and Melanie Harring, Advisors
Office: Dempsey 130
Telephone: 920-424-3454
E-mail: simonsen@uwosh.edu,harrim87@uwosh.edu

PRE-CHIROPRACTIC

Students wishing to train for the chiropractic profession may take the required two years (60 units (crs.) of pre-chiropractic studies at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and then transfer to a college which offers a degree in that field. As of Fall 2001, most chiropractic colleges will require 90 units (crs.)or a baccalaureate degree for admission to their programs.

The professional education that required to become a Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) takes five plus years, including two years at Oshkosh. With the future requirement of 90 units (crs.) or completion of a bachelor’s degree prior to enrollment in their programs, the total number of years of education required at each level may be different. Contact the chiropractic school you plan to attend for additional information.

The following is a typical two year pre-chiropractic study program:
Freshman Year
Term I   Term II   
Biology105 4 cr. Biology
Biology
211 and 212 or
303
5 cr.
Chemistry 105 5 cr. Chemistry 106 5 cr.
Communication 111 3 cr. English 101 3 cr.
Mathematics* xxx 3-5 cr. Mathematics* xxx 3-5 cr.
   Elective xxx 3 cr.
Total: 15-17 units (crs.)   Total: 19-21 units (crs.)  
*Select from Mathematics 108 or (104 and 106) depending on Placement Test results. Complete through trigonometry.

Sophomore Year
Term I   Term II   
Chemistry 235 4 cr.Chemistry 335 4 cr.
Physics 107 5 cr. Physics 108 5 cr.
Psychology 101 3 cr. Electives xxx 6 cr.
Elective xxx 3 cr.   
Total: 15 units (crs.)  Total: 15 units (crs.)  

Junior Year
Additional course work, preferably at the 300 or 400 level, to include a concentration of classes in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities with an average of 15-16 units (crs.) per term.

Additional information: Professional
American Chiropractic Association
1701 Clarendon Blvd
Arlington, VA 22209
703-276-8808, 1-800-986-INFO

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-DENTISTRY

90 units (crs.) of pre-dental work is generally required for admission to dental school, although many students enter dental school upon completion of a Bachelor's degree. The Dental Admission Test (D.A.T.) and good college grades are required. In Wisconsin, the dental school is at Marquette University in Milwaukee. Because there is no state-supported dental school, a student wishing to attend dental school at Marquette can get tuition support.

A typical program of study is given below. It includes only those courses required for dental school. Students should select additional courses from the list of suggested electives.

Note: Mathematics 103 is a prerequisite for the Chemistry courses, and Mathematics 108 or 104 followed by Mathematics 106 are prerequisites for Physics 107 and 108. Select mathematics course according to your placement test results.

Freshman Year
Term I   Term II   
Biology105 4 cr. Biology 230 4 cr.
Chemistry 105 5 cr. Chemistry 106 5 cr.
Mathematics* xxx 3-5 cr. Mathematics* xxx 3-5 cr.
English 101 3 cr. Communication 111 3 cr.
   Electives xxx 3 cr.
Total: 15-17 units (crs.)   Total: 18-20 units (crs.)  

*Select from Mathematics 103, 108 or (104 + 106)

Sophomore Year
Term I   Term II   
Chemistry 235 4 cr. Chemistry 335 4 cr.
English 2xx 3 cr. Electives xxx 8-12 cr.
Mathematics complete sequence
Electives xxx 6-8 cr.   
Total: 16-18 units (crs.)  Total: 12-16 units (crs.)  

Junior Year
Term I   Term II   
Physics* 107 5 cr. Physics* 108 5 cr.

*Physics sequence may be started sooner depending on the level of mathematics.

Electives: Quantitative analysis, speech, literature, history, psychology, philosophy, foreign languages, art, biology (human related), child and adolescent psychology, mathematics, economics, biochemistry, accounting or management. Additional biology and biochemistry courses (human related) are strongly recommended.

Additional Information: Professional
The American Dental Association
211 E Chicago Ave
Chicago, IL 60611
312-440-2500, www.ada.org

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-ENGINEERING

Engineering professions include a variety of fields such as electrical, computer, mechanical, civil, mining, architectural, biomedical, environmental, industrial, chemical, geological, materials science, manufacturing, and nuclear.

Engineering Education:
  • Two years of liberal arts (pre-engineering) courses to include calculus, physics, chemistry, English, economics and, in some cases, speech
  • Two to three years of engineering course work

Engineering programs in Wisconsin include:
University of Wisconsin Madison
University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
University of Wisconsin Platteville
University of Wisconsin Stout
Marquette University
Milwaukee School of Engineering

Course suggestions for students attending UW engineering schools:
Required courses will vary depending on the school and engineering specialty selected. It is important that pre-engineering students meet regularly with pre-engineering advisors, and that they contact the school where they plan to complete the engineering program early in their college careers.

The following first semester courses are suggested, with exceptions to this schedule noted below:

  • Chemistry 105 5 credits
  • Computer Science 221 3 credits
  • Mathematics 171 (or begin the math sequence based on placement test results) 4 credits*
  • Practical Arts 101 3 credits**

* Start math sequence according to Placement Test results. Note that lower placement will delay taking Physics 109 which is calculus-based. If placed into Mathematics 104 or 108, it is best to take 108 or take 104 in Fall term and Mathematics 106 in January Interim (104 + 106 = 108) to progress through the math sequence more quickly.

** Practical Arts 101 is required for all engineering programs at UW Platteville; industrial, civil and mechanical at UW Milwaukee; and agricultural, mechanical and engineering mechanics at UW Madison. Do not take 101 for electrical or materials engineering at UW Milwaukee or for electrical, materials, chemical, civil, geological, industrial, metallurgical, and nuclear at UW Madison. Instead substitute a social science or humanities elective. Economics 206 would be a good choice.

Of the four courses listed, Computer Science 221 may be taken later so the student substitute a social science, humanities or English composition course.

English 101 is required by both UW Platteville and UW Milwaukee. Students attending UW Madison must have taken it or tested out of it. Communication 111 is appropriate for all engineers attending UW Platteville, but only for electrical, civil and chemical engineers at UW Madison. It does not meet any requirement for other engineering specialties at UW Madison and is not needed for engineering at UW Milwaukee.

Sample Schedules: Exact course depend on the engineering specialty and the university the student plans to attend later.

Mechanical Engineering:

Freshman Year
Term I   Term II   
Chemistry 105 5 cr. Chemistry 106 5 cr.
Mathematics 171 4 cr. Mathematics 172 4 cr.
Practical Arts 101 3 cr. Practical Arts 102 3 cr.
Comp Sci 221 3 cr. Physics 109 5 cr.
Total: 15 units (crs.)   Total: 17 units (crs.)  

Sophmore Year
Term I   Term II   
Mathematics 273 4 cr. Mathematics 301 3 cr.
Physics 110 5 cr. Mathematics 371 3 cr.
Mathematics 201 3 cr. Physics 202 3 cr.
Elective xxx 3 cr. Physics 206 3 cr.
Total: 15 units (crs.)   Total: 16 units (crs.)  

Chemical Engineering:

Freshman Year
Term I   Term II   
Chemistry 105 5 cr. Chemistry 106 5 cr.
Mathematics 171 4 cr. Physics 109 5 cr.
Comp Sci 221 3 cr. English 101 3 cr.
Elective xxx 3 cr. Elective xxx 3 cr.
Total: 15 units (crs.)   Total: 16 units (crs.)  

Sophmore Year
Term I   Term II   
Mathematics 172 4 cr. Mathematics 273 4 cr.
Physics 110 5 cr. Chemistry 335 4 cr.
Chemistry 235 4 cr. Chemistry 221 5 cr.
Elective xxx 3 cr. Elective xxx 3 cr.
Total: 16 units (crs.)   Total: 16 units (crs.)  

Electrical Engineering:

Freshman Year
Term I   Term II   
Mathematics 171 4 cr. Mathematics 172 4 cr.
Chemistry 105 5 cr. Physics 109 5 cr.
Comp Sci 221 3 cr. English 101 3 cr.
Economics 206 3 cr. Elective xxx 3-6 cr.
Total: 15 units (crs.)   Total: 15-18 units (crs.)  

Sophmore Year
Term I   Term II   
Mathematics 273 4 cr. Mathematics 371 3 cr.
Physics 110 5 cr. Physics 206 4 cr.
Elective xxx 6 cr. Mathematics 355 3 cr.
    Elective xxx 6 cr.
Total: 15 units (crs.)   Total: 16 units (crs.)  

Electives/Fall and Spring Interims: Electives (3 cr. each) are to be selected from social sciences and humanities. Most engineering programs, including mechanical and chemical, require 16-18 units (crs.) of liberal electives, roughly divided between these categories. Several schools require English 101 and Communication 111. Economics 206 and Psychology 101 are recommended choices from the social sciences. Interims provide an opportunity to complete some of these courses and to lighten the regular semester unit (cr.) load.

Mechanical engineering students who choose to take a lighter load in the freshmen year could take Computer Science 221 and English 101 at a later time.

Faculty Advisors:
Roy Knispel, Physics Department, 424-4431
Sandra Neuendorf, Chemistry Department, 424-7101

AcademicAdvisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-LAW

A Bachelor's degree is required for entrance to most American law schools, and the degree may be earned in any major a student chooses. There are no prescribed courses for admittance to law school, which is a three year program. In Wisconsin, there are law schools at UW Madison and Marquette University. It is recommended that students contact those institutions for specifics about their programs.

A student planning to apply to law school should be aware to the following deadlines:

  • Most law schools require applicants to take the Law College Admissions Test (LSAT). The test is administered four times a year. A mock LSAT is available at our Testing Center.
  • Nearly all law schools require first year students to begin their studies in the fall term.
  • Some law schools make admission decisions as early as October of the year prior to student entry.
  • A student who plans to graduate in May and enter law school that same year (September) should plan to take the LSAT in June after the junior year and complete the law school application forms during that summer after receiving the results of the June exam.

Additional Information: Programs
University of Wisconsin Law School
Admissions and Financial Aid
975 Bascom Hall
Madison, WI 543706-1399
Phone: 608-262-5914
E-mail:admissions@law.wisc.edu

Marquette University Law School
Office of Admissions
Sensenbrenner Hall
1103 W Wisconsin Ave
Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881
Phone: 414-288-6767
E-mail: law.admission@marquette.edu

Additional Information: Professional
American Bar Association
750 North Lake Shore Dr
Chicago, IL 60611
312-988-5000
Web Site: www.abanet.org

National Lawyers Association
Information Services City Center Square
PO Box 26005
Kansas City, MO 64196
1-800-471-2994
Web Site: www.nla.org

Faculty Advisor:
Martin Gruberg, Political Science, 424-0146

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-MEDICINE

Admission to a medical school is based for the most part on two requirements; 1) a Bachelor's degree with excellent grades, and 2) high scores on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). Contact the medical school you plan to attend for additional information.

Medical school includes four years of training and a hospital internship of one or two years. In Wisconsin, medical schools are located at UW Madison and the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

Medical schools generally require the following pre-medical courses as a requirement for acceptance into their program:
  • one year of general biology or zoology
  • one term of advanced biology
  • one year of general chemistry
  • one year of organic chemistry
  • one year of English
  • mathematics through college algebra and trigonometry
  • one year of physics
  • one term of quantitative analysis

In addition, one term of calculus and one term of biochemistry are recommended.

All medical schools require applicants to take the MCAT, which is given each August and April. The MCAT scores are submitted with the student's application to medical school in early fall of the year prior to entrance.

Additional Information: Programs
University of Wisconsin Madison
Medical School
1300 Unniversity Ave
Madison, WI 53706-1532
608-263-4925

The Medical College of Wisconsin
Office of Admissions
8701 Watertown Plank Rd
Milwaukee, WI 53226
414-456-8246

Additional Information: Professional
American Medical Association
515 N State St
Chicago, IL 60610
312-464-5000
Web Site: www.ama-assn.org

Faculty Advisor:
Robert Moore, Chemistry, 424-1486
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

The occupational therapist is a health professional who aids people in acquiring and maintaining life tasks which include motor skills, interpersonal skills, self-care abilities, work-related skills, and the use of leisure time. When these skills fail to develop or are limited due to illness or injury, occupational therapy may be utilized to train or restore some of these functional abilities.

Pre-occupational therapy students take some science courses along with a number of General Education courses. Accredited occupational therapy programs in Wisconsin are located at University of Wisconsin Madison, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Mount Mary College (Milwaukee) and Concordia University Wisconsin (Mequon). Both UW Madison and UW Milwaukee award Bachelor’s degrees in occupational therapy as do Mount Mary and Concordia. Beginning in the fall of 1999, Concordia will offer an OT master’s degree and will discontinue the undergraduate OT degree. UW La Crosse has a program and is in the development/accreditation process now.

Students beginning their course work at UW Oshkosh who plan to become occupational therapists should plan to transfer to one of the above programs after one year. This is important as certain pre-professional courses are not available at UW Oshkosh. All students are encouraged to contact the school they will transfer to early in their college careers.

The following is a sample freshman year for those students planning to transfer to the UW Madison:

Freshman Year
Term I   Term II   
Biology* 105 4 cr. Biology 230 4 cr.
English 101 3 cr. English 2xx 3 cr.
Mathematics** 104 3 cr. Chem+ 101 or 105 4-5 cr.
Anthropology 232 3 cr. Statistics++  3 cr.
Psychology 101 3 cr.   
Total: 16 units (crs.)   Total: 14-15 units (crs.)  

* Biology 105 is a prerequisite for Biology 230 at Oshkosh, but otherwise is not required by Madison.
**Course taken depends on Math Placement Test. If not exempt from Mathematics 103, student would have to take this first.
+ Chemistry 101 may be appropriate if student has not had high school chemistry; otherwise select Chemistry 105.
++Choose from several courses including Mathematics 201, Psychology 203, and Sociology 181. Mathematics 107 is an appropriate statistics course only if the student has not yet taken math beyond Mathematics 103.

Pre-occupational therapy students planning to transfer to UW Milwaukee should contact the School of Allied Health Professions. During their freshman year at UW Oshkosh they should plan to complete courses which will fulfill some of Milwaukee’s distribution education requirements. These could include English 101,courses through Mathematics 104, two humanities courses, two natural science courses, Psychology 101, and Psychology 205 or Sociology 151. See an academic advisor for other pre-professional course suggestions.

Additional Information: Professional
American Occupational Therapy Association
4720 Montgomery Ln
PO Box 31220
Bethesda, MD 20824-1220
301-652-2682
Web Site: www.aota.org

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-OPTOMETRY

Students interested in optometry as a profession can take their three years (90 units (crs.)) of pre-optometry course work at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and then transfer to one of 17 optometry schools for four years of professional optometry training leading to a Doctor of Optometry (O.D.). Some schools give preference to students who have completed a Bachelor’s degree.

There is no requirement that a student major in a particular area as long as the program of study includes the following courses:

  • one year of general chemistry (Chemistry 105 and Chemistry 106)
  • one year of physics (Physics/Astronomy 107 and Physics/Astronomy 108)
  • two years of biology (Biology 105 and Biology 233 or Biology 309; Biology 343 and Biology 323 are recommended)
  • Chemistry 235
  • Statistics (course taken depends on mathematics background)
  • Mathematics 171
  • Psychology 101
  • other social science electives

In addition, applicants for admission to schools and colleges of optometry in the United States are required to take the Optometry Admission Test (OAT). Many schools would like this to be taken in the spring term of the year before application is made. Students are also encouraged to contact the school at which they plan to complete their Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) degree early in their academic career.

Additional Information: Professional
American Optometric Association
243 N Lindbergh Blvd
St Louis, MO 63121-7881
314-991-4101
Web Site: www.aoanet.org

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076
Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

The field of osteopathic medicine is very similar to the field of medicine. The difference between the degree of Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) and the M.D. degree lies primarily in the emphasis placed during the training years on palpatory diagnosis and manipulative treatment in conjunction with all other recognized diagnostic and therapeutic modalities in total health care management.

Acceptance into one of the 18 colleges of osteopathic medicine is very competitive. The student will need high grades and should score well on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), which is required before application. All colleges of osteopathic medicine require that at least 90 term hours be completed at the time of application. In addition, certain basic science courses are required. While only 90 term hours are the minimum requirement for entrance to osteopathic medical colleges, most students will enter with either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree.

Colleges of osteopathic medicine generally require the following courses as the minimum requirement for acceptance into their program:
  • one year of general biology
  • one year of general chemistry
  • one year of organic chemistry
  • one year of English
  • one year of physics

Additionally, courses in the social sciences, humanities, mathematics and advanced biology are highly recommended.

Additional Information: Professional
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine
5550 Friendship Blvd, Ste 310
Chevy Chase, MD 20815-7231
301-968-4100
Web Site: www.aacom.org

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-PHARMACY

Becoming a pharmacist usually requires six years of study: two years in pre-professional study at a school like the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and four years at a pharmacy school. The pharmacy school in Wisconsin is at the University of Wisconsin Madison.

The following program of study will fulfill the pre-pharmacy requirements of the University of Wisconsin Pharmacy School. Students must have a minimum of 70 units (crs.) to enter the Pharmacy program. This may require interim or summer courses and could take more than two years depending on math placement.

Freshman Year
Term I   Term II   
Biology* 105 4 cr. Biology 230 4 cr.
Math** 108 5 cr. Math 171 4 cr.
Chemistry 105 5 cr. Chemistry 106 5 cr.
English 101 3 cr. Psychology 101 3 cr.
Electives xxx 3 cr.   
Total: 20 units (crs.)   Total: 16 units (crs.)  

Sophomore Year
Term I   Term II   
Chemistry 235 4 cr. Chemistry 335 4 cr.
Physics 107 5 cr. Physics 108 5 cr.
Economics 206 3 cr.Biology+ 323 or 231 or
308
3-5 cr.
Anthropology++ 232 3 cr. English xxx 3 cr.
Social Science or
Elective
xxx 3 cr.   
Total: 18 units (crs.)   Total: 15-17 units (crs.)  

*Biology 105 is a prerequisite for all biology classes listed above.
**The mathematics course a student takes depends on the Placement Test results. Mathematics through calculus is required for admission to pharmacy school.
+Biology 323 is preferred.
++An ethnic studies course is required and counts as a social science as well as an ethnic studies course.
Humanities and social science courses (psychology, sociology, history, economics) may be available during interims and/or summer sessions. As mentioned above, completion of the required course work may take longer than two years, depending on math placement and number of units taken each semester.

Faculty Advisor:
Robert Moore, Chemistry, 424-1486

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY

The profession of physical therapy serves individuals whose ability to function has been impaired by disease or injury. Physical therapy programs in Wisconsin are located at the UW Madison, UW La Crosse, UW Milwaukee,Concordia Univer-sity, and Marquette University. Each of these universities awards a Master’s degree in physical therapy.

A Bachelor’s degree is required of students applying for admission to one of these Master’s degree programs. Since some of the prerequisite courses for the Master’s program can be completed while earning a Bachelor’s degree at the universities listed above, students enrolled at the UW Oshkosh should transfer to a school having a physical therapy program after one year of course work. Students should contact the school where they will complete their undergraduate degree early in the first term of their freshman year.

The following are suggested first year classes for those students who will be transferring to either the UW Madison or the UW La Crosse.

  • one year of general chemistry (Chemistry 105 and Chemistry 106)
  • mathematics (complete mathematics through Mathematics 171, beginning the math sequence according to the math placement test results.)
  • one year of biology (Biology 105 and Biology 230)
  • English 101
  • Psychology 101
  • English xxx (literature)
  • other humanities electives

Other suggested courses include: physics (Physics/Astronomy 107 and Physics/Astronomy 108), statistics, and additional psychology courses.

Additional Information: Professional
American Physical Therapy Association
1111 N Fairfax St
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-684-APTA
Web Site: www.apta.org

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT

Physician Assistants (PA’s) practice medicine with supervision by licensed physicians in the United States. PA’s practice in a wide variety of medical specialties from family practice to cardiovascular surgery. Their duties depend on the type of practice, their experience and education, the relationship with the physician supervisor and other health care providers, and the state laws that regulate the PA’s.

The typical PA program is 24 - 25 months long, requires at least two years of college and some health care experience prior to admission to a program. The two years of PA training is similar to two years of medical school. The majority of PA students already have a BA/BS degree and four years or more of health care experience (ex. nurses, paramedics, emergency medical technicians) before admission to a PA program. Students interested in a PA program should contact the school at which they intend to complete the PA program as soon as possible in their academic or health care careers.

The following courses are prerequisites for the UW La Crosse program. At the time of application candidates must have these completed or demonstrate a plan for completion prior to enrollment in the program. Additional information is available on the UW La Crosse website (www.uwlax.edu).

Completion of courses to satisfy UW La Crosse general education requirements or already holding a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college. Coursework must total a minimum of 90 semester hours and must include a minimum of:

  • five semesters of biology with at least two laboratory courses (courses must include at least 1 semester of general/intro biology; one semester each of anatomy and physiology or a two semester combined course sequence covering this material; one semester of microbiology; and one semester from one of the following -- genetics, immunology, vertebrate embryology, or endocrinology)
  • four semesters of chemistry with at least two laboratory courses (courses must include two semesters of general/introductory/inorganic chemistry; one semester of organic chemistry for majors or the two semester sequence; one semester of either biochemistry, molecular chemistry or cell physiology)
  • two semesters of mathematics (statistics and pre-calculus or college algebra and trig or calculus)
  • general/introductory psychology with additional courses in psych and sociology recommended
  • one semester of physics recommended
  • cumulative grade point of 3.0

Applicants must also meet the program’s technical standards.

Additional Information: Professional
The Association of Physician Assistants Programs
950 N Washington St
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-548-5538
Web Site: www.aapa.org

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-PODIATRY

The field of podiatric medicine is an area of medicine which is concerned with prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and disorders affecting the human foot and its related structures.

Acceptance into one of the seven colleges of podiatry is very competitive. The pre-podiatry student will need excellent grades and will also have to score well on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), which is required before application. All colleges of podiatry require that a minimum of 90 term hours be completed at the time of enrollment. Recent statistics show most entering students have obtained the Bachelor's degree prior to entering podiatry school. Colleges of podiatry generally require the following courses as the minimum for acceptance into their program:

  • one year of general biology (Biology 105 is a prerequisite to other biology courses)
  • one year of general chemistry (Chemistry 105 and Chemistry 106)
  • one year of organic chemistry (Chemistry 235 and Chemistry 335)
  • one year of English composition (English 101 and an advanced composition course)
  • one year of physics (Physics/Astronomy 107 and Physics/Astronomy 108)
  • mathematics (through Mathematics 108 or Mathematics 104 and Mathematics 106)

Additional courses in advanced biology as well as social sciences, humanities and mathematics are highly recommended. Please see an advisor for assistance in selecting courses. Also, students are strongly encouraged to contact the podiatry school they plan to attend for information regarding that school’s specific requirements.

Additional Information: Professional
American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine
1350 Piccard Dr Ste 322
Rockville, MD 20850
301-984-9350 or 1-800-922-9266
Web Site: www.aacpm.org

Faculty Advisor:
Dana Vaughan, Biology, 424-3076

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE

Veterinarians work in small and/or large animal practices, public health agencies, research settings, and a variety of other positions. While two years of pre-veterinary study are the absolute minimum, some veterinary medical colleges give priority to applicants if they are a candidate for the baccalaureate degree.

Acceptance into one of the 27 veterinary medical schools in the United States is extremely competitive. The student will need very high grades and should score well on the admission test required by the school. Veterinary medical schools require four years of professional training in order to receive the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree (D.V.M.)

In Wisconsin, the veterinary medical school is located at the UW Madison. The following are suggested courses for a student in the pre-veterinary program who ultimately plans to attend the UW Madison.

  • Biology 105 and 230
  • Biology 323 and 343
  • Chemistry 105 and 106
  • Chemistry 235, 335 and 303 (335 is not required by Madison but is a prerequisite at Oshkosh for 302, which is recommended)
  • Physics 107 and 108
  • Mathematics 103, 104 and 106 or 108 (begin math according to placement test results; math 108 OR 104 AND 106 must be completed prior to physics)
  • Statistics (math 107 is acceptable if taken prior to math 104; otherwise take a different statistics class)
  • English 101
  • social science electives
  • humanities electives

Additional Information: Programs
University of Wisconsin Madison
School of Veterinary Medicine
Office of Academic Affairs
2015 Linden Dr W
Madison, WI 53706-1102
608-263-2525
Web Site: www.vetmed.wisc.edu.oaa/oaa.html

Additional Information: Professional
American Veterinary Medical Association
1931 N Mecham Rd Ste100
Schaumberg, IL 60173
847-925-8070
Web Site: www.avma.org

Faculty Advisor:
Colleen McDermott, Biology Department, 424-1102

Academic Advisors:
Gary Simonsen, Melanie Harring (Dempsey 130)

Questions, Comments...
  Please Email registrar@uwosh.edu

Last Updated July 1, 2001