UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN OSHKOSH

MATHEMATICS



John Koker, Chairperson
Department Office: Swart 115
Department Telephone: 920-424-1333

Code 67 or MATH

I. FACULTY

Benzaid, Edwards, Eroh, Ganapathy, Gunawardena, Khosravani, Koker, McDougal, Moghadam, Moussavi, Muthuvel, Oman, Price, Ramanayake, Seaman, Szydlik J., Szydlik S., Winters, Zhang

II. DEGREES

Undergraduate: A major in Mathematics can lead to the degree(s): Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Science; Bachelor of Science in Education.

Graduate: Students who complete a major in the Mathematics Department may want to continue in our graduate program leading to the degree: Master of Science in Mathematics Education.

For specifics, please see the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Graduate Bulletin.

III. SUMMARY OF FIELDS OF STUDY

1. GOAL(S)
The Mathematics Department has six general goals for students who major in mathematics. 1) Communication - Communicates effectively using appropriate mathematical language, symbolism, ideas, techniques and models. 2) Problem Solving-Uses problem solving strategies, algorithms, logic and heuristic reasoning to define, understand, and solve problems. 3) Technology-Uses appropriate technology to preform routine calculations, graph and analyze functions, and to create models. 4) Modeling-simplifies a non-mathematical problem making reasonable assumptions, interprets it mathematically and finds a solution. 5) Validation-Provides a convincing argument that the answer to a question or the solution to a problem is correct and consistent. 6)Connections-Recognizes relationships within and across the general content domains of discrete mathematics, continuous mathematics and probability.

2. THE MAJOR(S)
The Department offers a choice of four emphases within the Mathematics Major. These are: 1) Applied Mathematics, 2) Statistics, 3) Secondary Education, 4) Liberal Arts.

3. THE MINOR(S)
The Department offers five minor(s): 1) Mathematics for Letters and Science or Business Students, 2) Operations Research, 3) Mathematics for Secondary Education Certification, 4) Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Certification, 5) Statistics.

IV. ADMISSION/GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

To be eligible for graduation, students must meet all requirements for the degree being sought in addition to earning a minimum grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the Mathematics major or minor. Refer to the following Sections for complete major/minor course requirements.

Those students seeking Wisconsin teacher certification must earn a minimum grade point average of 3.00 in all courses required for their majors and minors in order to meet requirements of the College of Education and Human Services.

V. REQUIRED CORE COURSES

Mathematics
  • Mathematics 171 Calculus I 4 cr.
  • Mathematics 172 Calculus II 4 cr.
  • Mathematics 222 Intro to Abstract Mathematics 3 cr.
  • Mathematics 256 Intro to Linear Mathematics 3 cr.
  • Mathematics 273 Calculus III 4 cr.
  • Mathematics 301 Intro to Probability and Statistics 3 cr.

VI. THE MAJOR(S), WITH EMPHASES AND/OR OPTIONS

1. MATHEMATICS MAJOR

A. Applied Mathematics Emphasis
Recommended for students who would like to develop and use their mathematical ability for careers in business and industry.

Required Units (crs.): 40 minimum

Required Courses: In addition to the Core Courses:
  • Mathematics: Mathematics 365, 371, 355, 356, and 467.
  • Computer Science: Computer Science 221 (does NOT count toward the 40 unit (cr.) minimum).

Electives: Sufficient courses from the Department's offerings to meet the Minimum Requirement including these studies:
Mathematics: Mathematics 302, 304, 305, 331, 333, 334, 342, 346, 349, 357, 375, 376, 381, 385, 386, 401, 402, 480, and 485.

Comment:
Students interested in this Emphasis should pick up a handbook from the department secretary or advisor.

B. Statistics Emphasis

Required Units (crs.): 42 minimum

Required courses: In addition to the Core Courses:
  • Mathematics: Mathematics 200, 302, 401, 402, and 403.
  • Computer Science: Computer Science 221 (does not count toward the 42 unit (cr.) minimum).

Electives: three courses from the following: Mathematics 304, 305, 381, 385 and 386

C. Secondary Education Emphasis
Recommended for students who plan to teach junior or senior high school mathematics.

Required Units (crs.): 39 minimum

Required Courses: In addition to the Core Courses:
  • Mathematics: Mathematics 331; 333 or 334; 485; plus one course from: Mathematics 342, 346, or 349.

Electives: Sufficient courses from the Department's offerings to meet the Minimum Requirement selected so that at least one elective is selected from two of the following four areas (may not be double counted from the required courses): 1) Algebra-Mathematics 342, 346, or 349; 2) Geometry/topology-Mathematics 333, 334, or 480; 3) Probability/Statistics-Mathematics 302, 381, 385, 401, or 402; 4) Computing-Mathematics 352, 355, 356, or 357; 5) Analysis-Mathematics 371, or 467.

Comment:
Students interested in this emphasis should pick up a handbook from the department secretary or advisor.

D. Liberal Arts Emphasis
Recommended for students who want to continue the study of Mathematics beyond a Bachelor's Degree.

Required Units (crs.): 40 minimum

Required Courses: In addition to the core courses:
  • Mathematics: Mathematics 365 or 485; two courses from: Mathematics 342, 346, or 349; two courses from: Mathematics 375, 376, 467, or 480.

Electives: Sufficient courses from the Department's offerings to meet the minimum requirement including these studies: Mathematics 331, 333, 334, 352, 355, 356, 357, 365, 371, 381, 385, 401, 402, 480.

Comment:
Students interested in any emphasis in the mathematics major may obtain handbook from the department secretary or advisor.

VII. MINOR(S)

1. MATHEMATICS MINOR FOR LETTERS AND SCIENCE OR BUSINESS STUDENTS
Recommended for students who are majoring in fields related to Mathematics such as Business, Computer Science, Economics, Natural Sciences, Physical Sciences.

Required Units (crs.): 25 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Mathematics: Mathematics 171, 172, 222, 256, 273 and 301.

Electives: Choose courses from the following to meet the 25 credit minimum requirements: Mathematics 200, 302, 331, 334, 342, 346, 349, 355, 371, 375, and 376

Comment:
Electives must be approved by a mathematics advisor.

2. OPERATIONS RESEARCH MINOR
Recommended for students who are majoring in Business, Computer Science, Physical Sciences or similar fields.

Required Units (crs.): 26 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Mathematics: Mathematics 171, 172, 222, 256 and 301.
  • Business: Business Administration 341, 342, 441 or 449.

Electives: Sufficient courses from the Mathematics Department's offerings to meet the Minimum Unit (cr.) Requirement.

3. MATHEMATICS MINOR FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION LICENSURE
Recommended for students who have had four years of high school mathematics, are earning a degree in Secondary Education, and are planning to teach mathematics or a related field.

Required Units (crs.): 25 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Mathematics Minor (Secondary Education): Mathematics 171, 172, 222, 256, 301, 331 and 334.

Electives: One additional course in Algebra (Mathematics 342, 346, 349) or Geometry or Probability/Statistics or Computing Mathematics selected from department offerings.

4. MATHEMATICS MINOR FOR ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL LICENSURE
Recommended for students who have had four years of high school Mathematics, are earning a degree in Elementary Education, and are interested in teaching Elementary or Middle School Mathematics (Certification K-3/1-6/1-8/5-9).

Required Units (crs.): 24 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Mathematics: Mathematics 110, 211, 217, 490; plus three courses from: Mathematics 317, 319, 413, and 415.

Comment:
Since the upper level courses are necessarily offered at regularly ""spaced times,'' it is important that interested students declare the minor no later than their sophomore year. Courses numbered above 300 all have Mathematics 104 or equivalent as a prerequisite. Students who place into Mathematics 104 must complete it but that unit (cr.) does not apply to the minor.

5. STATISTICS MINOR
Recommended for students who are in the areas of Business, Computer Science, Education, Mathematics, Natural Science, Physical Science and Social Science.

Required Units (crs.): 27 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Computer Science: Computer Science 221 (does not count towards the 27 unit (cr.) minimum).
  • Mathematics: Mathematics 171, 172, 200, 222, 301, 302, and at least two courses from: Mathematics 304, 305, 381, 385, and 386.

Electives: Sufficient courses to meet the Minimum Unit (cr.) Requirement selected from these studies:

  • Business: Business Administration 341, 342, or 460.
  • Computer Science: Computer Science 351.
  • Economics: Economics 473.
  • Mathematics: Mathematics 304, 305, 381, 385, 386, 401, or 402.

Comment:
Mathematics majors with an emphasis other than statistics may earn a minor in statistics but they must have a minimum of 52 units (crs.) in Mathematics and Statistics approved by the Statistics advisor.

VIII. COURSE OFFERINGS

NOTE:
Prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better. The Mathematics Department recommendation for students entering their first course in mathematics is made on the basis of the student's high school record, ACT score, University objectives, and mathematics placement exam.

Students whose first mathematics course at UW Oshkosh is Mathematics 172 Calculus II and who have not received credit for Mathematics 171 Calculus I, may receive retroactive credit for Mathematics 171 under the following conditions:
  • Students must receive permission from the chair of the Math Department to register for Mathematics 172. The chair will take into account the student’s Math ACT score and evidence that the student is properly prepared for Mathematics 172.
  • Students must earn a grade of C or better in Mathematics 172.
  • The student must request in writing to the chair of the Math Department that retroactive credit be granted.

Mathematics 100 4 units (crs.)
Basic Algebra
Basic concepts about numbers, fundamental operations of arithmetic, algebraic expressions, an introduction to linear equations, functions, and factoring. Only those students failing to meet the prerequisites for Mathematics 103 will be recommended for this course. This course does not count toward the 120 units (crs.) necessary for graduation. A grade of C or better is required to remove mathematics deficiency. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 102 4 units (crs.)
Introduction of Modern Mathematics and its Applications (MA)
This is a course intended for students whose major program does not require algebra or calculus. Students will see that the connection between the mathematics presented and down-to-earth, concrete real-life problems is direct and immediate. Topics are selected from social choice (voting systems, fair division, apportionment), management science (graphs, networks, scheduling), growth and symmetry (growth, populations, patterns), statistics (data analysis, probability, distributions) and computer technology (algorithms, data storage, coding, graphics). Prerequisite: Mathematics 100 with a grade of C or better or placement. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 103 3 units (crs.)
Introduction to College Algebra (MA)
The structure of the real numbers, open sentences in one variable (equalities and inequalities), systems of linear open sentences, functions and graphs, polynomials and factoring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 100 with a C or better or placement. Not open to students who have completed Mathematics 104 or higher. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 104 3 units (crs.)
College Algebra
Equations and inequalities; graphs, functions and models; polynomial and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions. May not receive credit for both Mathematics 104 and 108. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103 with grade of C or better or placement.

Mathematics 106 2 units (crs.)
Trigonometry
A first course in trigonometry. Basic circular functions and their inverses. Trigonometric identities and equations. Triangle trigonometry. Law of Sines and Law of Cosines. Students may not receive credit for both Mathematics 108 and 106. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 with a grade of C or better or placement. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 107 3 units (crs.)
Introduction to Statistics (MA)
Descriptive statistics/elementary probability/basic problems of statistical inference: estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 100 with a C or better or placement. Not open to students who have completed Mathematics 104 or higher. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 108 5 units (crs.)
Pre-Calculus
A functional approach to college algebra and trigonometry. Polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, circular and trigonometric functions. Recommended for all students who place at this level and who expect to take the Mathematics 171 - 172 calculus sequence. May not receive credit for both Mathematics 104 and 108. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103 with a grade of C or better or placement.

Mathematics 110 3 units (crs.)
Number Systems
Exploring, conjecturing, communicating and reasoning within the content domain of the whole numbers, the integers, the rational numbers and the real numbers. Includes experiences with sets, number sense and numeration, number systems, number theory, concepts of operations on numbers, computational algorithms and estimation. Open only to students in Elementary and Special Education. Prerequisite: Initial math placement above the remedial level or a C or better in Mathematics 100. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 122 3 units (crs.)
Mathematics for Computer Science
Required of all Computer Science majors and minors. An introduction to truth tables and boolean functions, set theory, counting principles and the use of permutations and combinations, recurrence relations and the mathematical analysis of algorithms. Topics in discrete probability including random variables and expected values are also discussed. Prerequisite: Mathematics 108, 104, 106 or placement, and Computer Science 221 with a grade of C or better.

Mathematics 171 4 units (crs.)
Calculus I
Real valued functions of a single variable. Concept of derivative, antiderivative, and definite integral. Differentiation and applications, including optimization and curve-sketching. Emphasis on problem solving, approximation, data analysis, visualization. A graphics programmable calculator is required. Prerequisite: Mathematics 108 or 104 and Mathematics 106 with grade(s) of C or better or 4 years of college preparatory mathematics and a satisfactory score on a placement examination. (Fall-Spring)
Mathematics 172 4 units (crs.)
Calculus II
Definite integration and applications, several techniques of integration, approximation, and improper integrals. Numerical differential equations, slope fields, Euler's method, and mathematical modeling. Taylor and Fourier Series. A graphics programmable calculator is required. Prerequisite: Mathematics 171 with a grade of C or better. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 175 4 units (crs.)
Honors: Calculus I
Covers the same subject matter as Mathematics 171 but with greater mathematical depth and emphasis on heuristic problem solving processes, computer or calculator graphics, and applications. Prerequisite: University Honors status in addition to the prerequisites for Mathematics 171.

Mathematics 200 1 unit (cr.)
Minitab Statistical Computing
An introduction to the statistical computing package MINITAB. Descriptive techniques, graphical presentations of data, correlation and regression, random numbers and simulation, statistical tests. Prerequisite: A statistics course at the level of Mathematics 107 or higher or concurrent registration in such a statistics course.

Mathematics 201 3 units (crs.)
Applied Statistics
An introduction to applied statistics using a statistical computing package such as MINITAB. Topics include: Descriptive statistics, elementary probability, discrete and continuous distributions, interval and point estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation. Credit cannot be earned for both Mathematics 107 and 201. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or 108 with a grade of C or better. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 204 4 units (crs.)
Mathematics for Business Analysis I
This course is designed to acquaint business students with mathematical techniques which are useful in business and management. Topics include functions, matrix algebra and applications, linear programming, probability, and mathematics of finance. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103 or 108 with a grade of C or above. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 206 4 units (crs.)
Mathematics for Business Analysis II
This course follows Mathematics 204. Topics include logarithmic and exponential functions, differential and integral calculus and their application to business problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104,108 or 204 with a grade of C or better or placement. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 207 4 units (crs.)
Short Course in Calculus
A basic calculus course designed to give students a practical working knowledge of differential and integral calculus. Applications of algebraic, logarithmic and exponential functions will be presented in the areas of business, natural sciences, and the social sciences. Students may not receive credit for both Mathematics 206 and 207. Not open to students who have completed Mathematics 171 or equivalent. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or 108 with a grade of C or better or placement test.

Mathematics 211 3 units (crs.)
Fundamentals of Geometry and Measurement for Elementary and Special Education Programs (MA)
Intuitive geometry and topology. Introduction to motion geometry. Measurement of length, area, volume and angle size. Includes a content foundation for teaching the geometry and measurement concepts recommended in the DPI K-8 guidelines. Prerequisite: Mathematics 110 with a grade of C or better. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 217 3 units (crs.)
Data Exploration and Analysis
This course uses activities and experiments to develop ideas about analyzing and reporting data, statistical techniques, probability and simulation. Most activities will involve data gathered from real life situations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 110 with a grade of C or better. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 222 3 units (crs.)
Introduction to Abstract Mathematics
Basic properties of functions, sets, and relations presented in various contexts. Emphasis on the precise use of language, the logical structure of mathematical statements, and the structure of proofs. Proof methods include induction, proof by contradiction, direct proof, and the construction of examples and counter examples. Examples may be drawn from various topics such as the integers, rational and real numbers, geometry, calculus, combinatorics, modern algebra and real analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 172 and either Mathematics 256 or 273, all with grades of C or better.

Mathematics 256 3 units (crs.)
Introduction to Linear Mathematics
An introduction to linear algebra based on the study of matrices, with an emphasis on situations which can be interpreted geometrically in the plane or in space. Topics include: matrix operations, systems of linear equations, determinants, eigenevectors and eigenvalues, properties of Rn(with emphasis on R2 and R3 and applications of each of these topics. Most computation will be done on TI-85 or equivalent technology. Prerequisite: Mathematics 171 with a grade of C or better. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 273 4 units (crs.)
Calculus III
Vectors in two and three dimensions and vector functions. Multivariate differential and integral calculus, partial derivatives and multiple integrals. Line and surface integrals. Prerequisite: Mathematics 172 with a grade of C or better. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 287 1 unit (cr.)
Elementary Topics in Mathematics
Elementary level topics from such areas as: decision theory, game theory, graphs and networks, linear programming, applications of calculus to biology, ecology, and the social
sciences, mathematical modeling, and statistics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or 108 with a grade of C of better.

Mathematics 301 3 units (crs.)
Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Elementary probability models, discrete and continuous random variables, sampling and sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Mathematics 122 and 172 with a grade of C or better. (Fall-Spring)

Mathematics 302 3 units (crs.)
Intermediate Statistical Methods
Emphasis on models & methods used in statistical applications. Topics covered include: two-sample procedures, linear regression and correlation, analysis of variance, goodness of fit tests. Prerequisite: Mathematics 200 (may be taken concurrently) and Mathematics 301. (Spring)

Mathematics 304 3 units (crs.)
Introduction to Nonparametric Methods
Statistical methods when the functional form of the population is unknown. Emphasis on applications and comparison of methods. One and two sample tests, contingency tables, tolerance limits, confidence intervals for means, tests of significance for some measures of correlation, and K-sample tests. Prerequisite: Mathematics 200 and a statistics course at the level of Mathematics 201 or higher.

Mathematics 305 3 units (crs.)
Statistics for Quality and Productivity
Statistical process control charts including Shewart and CUSUM. Design of experiments including factorials, fractional factorials and designs to explore response surfaces. The roles of blocking, confounding and randomization. The course will be about 25% statistical process control and about 75% design of experiments. Prerequisite: Mathematics 302. 305/505

Mathematics 317 4 units (crs.)
Probability and Statistics for Elementary and Middle School Programs
An introduction to probability and statistics emphasizing problem solving and communication. Topics include sample spaces, permutations and combinations, random variables, expected value, probability distributions, hypothesis testing and statistical inference. This course will employ technology and contain a historical component. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or equivalent, Mathematics 211 and 217 each with a grade of C or better. 317/517

Mathematics 319 4 units (crs.)
Infinite Processes for Elementary & Middle School Programs
An introduction to infinite processes; this course emphasizes problem solving and communication. Topics include functions, continuity, limiting processes, rates of change, optimization, approximation of areas and volumes, sequences and series. This course will employ technology and will contain a historical component. (May not receive credit for both Mathematics 319 and Mathematics 171.) Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or equivalent, Mathematics 211 and 217 each with a grade of C or better.

Mathematics 331 2 units (crs.)
Fundamentals of Geometry
An introduction to the evolution of geometry, modern elementary geometry, transformation theory, and modern axiomatic Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 222. (Spring)

Mathematics 333 2 units (crs.)
Synthetic Projective Geometry
Topics include duality, harmonic sequences, projective transformations, and conics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 331 with a grade of C or better.

Mathematics 334 2 units (crs.)
Hyperbolic Geometry
This course will survey the history of non-Euclidean geometry and develop the basic properties of hyperbolic geometry. A consistency model will be constructed in the Euclidean plane and hyperbolic trigonometry developed by the use of this model. Prerequisite: Mathematics 331 with a grade of C or better. (Spring)

Mathematics 342 3 units (crs.)
Abstract Algebra I
A survey course in modern algebra including such topics as: basic properties of the integers, a study of groups and their properties with examples and applications, other systems including rings and fields. Prerequisite: Mathematics 222 with a grade of C or better. 342/542

Mathematics 346 3 units (crs.)
Linear Algebra
An introduction to finite dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices and determinants (with applications to systems of linear equations) and characteristic values and characteristic vectors. Additional topics may include advanced work involving: characteristic values and characteristic vectors, Jordan canonical form, inner products, quadratic forms. Prerequisite: Mathematics 256 with a grade of C or better. 346/546 (Fall)

Mathematics 349 3 units (crs.)
Elementary Number Theory
Divisibility, primes, congruences, quadratic reciprocity, number theoretic functions, Diophantine equations, continued fractions, and selected topics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 222 with a grade of C or better. 349/549

Mathematics 352 3 units (crs.)
Computing Mathematics with Applications
An introduction to programming in Mathematica or a similar software package. The course begins by exploring the numerical, algebraic and graphical capabilities of the software. Topics include lists, functions and programming with applications to number theory, discrete mathematics, analysis and probability. Prerequisite: Mathematics 172. 352/552

Mathematics 355 3 units (crs.)
Introduction to Numerical Analysis
Topics in numerical computations selected from polynomial interpolation, solution of nonlinear equations, numerical integration, numerical solution of differential equations, and approximation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 273, Computer Science 151 or equivalent. 355/555 (Fall)

Mathematics 356 3 units (crs.)
Linear Numerical Analysis
Topics in numerical linear algebra selected from: Gaussian elimination, matrix inversion, eigenvector and eigenvalue computations, error analysis, condition numbers and pivoting strategies. Prerequisite: Mathematics 273, Mathematics 256, Computer Science 151 or equivalent. 356/556 (Spring)

Mathematics 357 3 units (crs.)
Linear Programming
Application and theory of linear programming. Primal and dual formulations, sensitivity analysis, simplex method, transportation algorithm, and the assignment problem. Students will learn modeling and how to apply linear programming to problems. Case studies are used. This course is appropriate for mathematics students as well as students from other fields. Prerequisite: Mathematics 256.

Mathematics 365 2 units (crs.)
Math Modeling
Research, analysis, and construction of mathematical models for 'real world' problems. Application to areas within and outside mathematics. Oral group presentations and a written technical report are required. Prerequisite: Completion of core plus 12 units (crs.) in math numbered 300 or above. (Spring)

Mathematics 371 3 units (crs.)
Differential Equations
An introductory course treating ordinary differential equations of the first and second order; linear equations with constant coefficients; solutions using series, the Laplace transform, and numerical methods. Prerequisite: Mathematics 172. 371/571 (Spring)

Mathematics 375 3 units (crs.)
Applied Mathematical Analysis I
Topics in mathematics applicable to the physical sciences: Vector analysis, Green's theorem and generalizations, analytic function theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 273. 375/575 (Fall)

Mathematics 376 3 units (crs.)
Applied Mathematical Analysis II
Topics in mathematics applicable to the physical sciences: solutions of certain classical differential equations (ordinary and partial), Fourier methods, and applied linear algebra. Prerequisite: Mathematics 371. 376/576 (Spring)

Mathematics 381 3 units (crs.)
Stochastic Modeling
Conditional probability and conditional expectation, Markov chains, Poisson processes,branching processes and population growth. Prerequisite: Mathematics 256 and 301. 381/581

Mathematics 385 3 units (crs.)
Applied Regression Analysis
A practical introduction to regression emphasizing applications rather than theory. Simple and multiple regression analysis, basic components of experimental design, and elementary model building. Both conventional and computer techniques will be used in performing the analyses. Prerequisite: Mathematics 200, 256 and 301. 385/585

Mathematics 386 3 units (crs.)
Linear Statistical Models
A unified approach to the application of linear statistical models in analysis of variance (ANOVA) and experimental design. In ANOVA topics from single-factor ANOVA and multifactor ANOVA will be considered. Experimental design will include randomized blocks, Latin squares, and incomplete block designs. Prerequisite: Mathematics 256 and 302. 386/586

Mathematics 401 3 units (crs.)
Mathematical Statistics I
Probability and combinatorial methods. Discrete and continuous, univariate and multivariate distributions, expected values, moments, normal distributions and derived distributions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 273 and 301. 401/601 (Fall)

Mathematics 402 3 units (crs.)
Mathematical Statistics II
Estimation, testing hypothesis, analysis of variance, comparison of means, least squares analysis, regression and correlation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 401. 402/602 (Spring)

Mathematics 403 2 units (crs.)
Issues in Statistical Practice
Selected readings and projects illustrating some of the special problems encountered by professional statisticians in their roles as consultants, educators and researchers. Prerequisite: Mathematics 401 and at least two courses from Mathematics 303, 305, 381, 385 and 386. (Spring)

Mathematics 413 4 units (crs.)
Modern Algebra for Elementary and Middle School Programs
An intuitive and investigative study of selected mathematical structures (groups, rings, integral domains, fields and vector spaces), sets, operations and functions including historical aspects. Emphasis is on problem solving. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or equivalent, Mathematics 211 and 217 each with a grade of C or better. 413/613

Mathematics 415 4 units (crs.)
Modern Geometry for Elementary and Middle School Programs
An informal approach to geometry. Topics are chosen from transformational (motion) geometry (reflections, rotations, translations and glide-reflections), symmetry, fractal geometry, spatial visualization, topology and graph theory including historical aspects. Emphasis is on problem solving and reasoning using technology and math manipulatives. The course will contain a historical component. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104, or equivalent, Mathematics 211 and 217 each with a grade of C or better. 415/615

Mathematics 446 1-3 units (crs.)
Independent Study
See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

Mathematics 467 3 units (crs.)
Advanced Calculus
Real number properties and the topology of the real numbers. Limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration. Sequences and infinite series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 273 with a grade of C or better. 467/667

Mathematics 474 1-6 units (crs.)
Honors: Thesis
Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study: e.g. a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be 'Honors Thesis.' Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Prerequisite: University Honors program and junior standing.

Mathematics 480 3 units (crs.)
Introduction to Topology
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of point set topology. Topics are chosen from: general topological spaces, functions and continuity, open and closed sets, neighborhoods, homeomorphism, properties of topological spaces, subspaces, products, and quotients. Emphasis will be placed on proofs and examples, with particular attention given to metric spaces. Prerequisite: Mathematics 222 and 273. 480/680

Mathematics 485 2 units (crs.)
Seminar in Mathematical Problem Solving
General heuristic strategies applied to non-routine mathematical problems. Interactive problem solving and analysis by participants. Designed for communicators of mathematics. Prerequisite: Completion of core, Mathematics 222 and 9 units (crs.) in math numbered 300 or above. 485 (Spring)

Mathematics 490 3 units (crs.)
Senior Seminar for Elementary and Middle School Programs
Seminar emphasizing problem solving and mathematical modeling in Elem/Middle School programs. Survey and study of research literature on the teaching and learning of mathematics, connections between the other courses in the mathematics minor. Experience with units from demonstration projects in middle school curriculum materials. Prerequisite: Senior status with major in elementary education and completion of 17 units (crs.) toward a minor in mathematics.

Questions, Comments...
  Please Email registrar@uwosh.edu

Last Updated July 1, 2001