UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN OSHKOSH

HISTORY



Andrew O’Shaugnessy, Chairperson
Department Office: Clow Faculty, Room 323
Department Telephone: 920-424-2456

Code 57 or HISTORY

I. FACULTY

Barricelli, Earns, Kercher, Mouton, O'Shaughnessy, Parsons, Rivers

II. DEGREES

Undergraduate: A major in History can lead to the degree(s): Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Science; Bachelor of Science in Education.

Graduate: The Department does not offer a graduate program.

III. SUMMARY OF FIELDS OF STUDY

1. GOAL(S)
The goals of the department of history are to ensure that each student majoring in history has been taught to assess historical events and historical writing in a critical fashion and to conduct research appropriate to the undergraduate level. In order to implement and evaluate these goals, the department requires students, with the assistance of faculty advisors, to compile a portfolio containing two samples of their work each year, including all papers produced in the senior seminar. History majors must meet with their advisors upon declaring their majors and then once a year thereafter in the fall to review their work from the previous year.

2. THE MAJOR(S)
The Department offers a single major, History.

3. THE MINOR(S)
The Department also offers a History minor.

IV. ADMISSION/GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

To be eligible for graduation, students must meet all requirements for the degree being sought in addition to earning a minimum grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the History major or minor.

Those students seeking Wisconsin teacher certification must earn a minimum grade point average of 3.00 in all courses required for their majors and minors in order to meet requirements of the College of Education and Human Services.

V. REQUIRED CORE COURSES

History
  • History 101 Early Civilization 3 cr.
  • History 102 Modern Civilization 3 cr.
  • History 201 U.S. History to 1877 3 cr.
  • History 202 Modern U.S. Since 1877 3 cr.

VI. THE MAJOR(S), WITH EMPHASES AND/OR OPTIONS


1.HISTORY MAJOR
Recommended for students who plan to study law, to do graduate work in History or Library Science, or to pursue careers in historical societies, museums, archives; local, state, or national governmental service; or business; and for secondary education students who wish to teach history at the high school level.

Required Units (crs.): 36 minimum

Required Courses: In addition to the core courses:
  • One 300-level course from American History.
  • One 300-level course from European History.
  • One 300-level course from Non-Western History.
  • One Seminar (History 411, History 412, History 413).
  • History 401 Historiography and Historial Methods

Electives: Sufficient courses from the Department's upper-level offerings to meet the minimum requirement.

Course Offerings:
  • American History courses: History 341, 358, 361, 362, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 385, 386, 390, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 397, 398.
  • European History courses: History 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 308, 310, 316, 318, 319, 322, 323, 329, 340, 350, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 379, 380, 387, 388, 389.
  • Non-Western History courses: History 375, 376, 377, 378, 381, 382, 383, 384.
  • Related courses: History 446, 456, 474.

Course Substitutions: Transfer students may substitute history units (crs.) earned at other institutions only after consultation with the chairperson of the History Department.

Comment:
The Department also provides support for a Broad Field Social Science Major that is recommended for students who plan to teach high school courses in the Social Science fields and courses such as civics, social problems, American problems, area studies, and vital issues in grades 7-12. See the College of Education and Human Services entry for Broad Field Social Science major requirements.

VII. MINOR(S)

1. HISTORY
Recommended for students who wish to add a minor in History to a related major such as Anthropology, Art, Business Administration, Criminal Justice, Economics, Geography, Library Science, Political Science, Speech.
Required Units (crs.): 24 minimum

Required Courses:
  • History: History 101, 102, 201, 202.

Other Requirements:
  • One 300-level course from American History.
  • One 300-level courses from European History.
  • One 300-level course from Non-Western History.

Electives: Sufficient courses from the Department's offerings to meet the Minimum Requirement

VIII. COURSE OFFERINGS

History 101 3 units (crs.)
Early Civilization (SS)
Survey of development of civilizations, including beginnings in Mesopotamia and Egypt, through Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. (Fall-Spring)

History 102 3 units (crs.)
Modern Civilization (SS)
Survey of development of Civilizations, including the high Renaissance through Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, and the emergence of nationalism and democracy to recent times. (Fall-Spring)

History 103 3 units (crs.)
Honors: Modern Civilization (SS)
Survey of development of Civilization, including the high Renaissance through Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, and the emergence of nationalism and democracy to recent times. Prerequisite: University Honors student.

History 201 3 units (crs.)
United States History to 1877 (SS)
Survey of United States history from voyages of discovery and early European settlement in North America, through colonial rivalries, struggle of English colonies for independence, expansion and development of young republic, and crisis of Civil War and Reconstruction. (Fall-Spring)

History 202 1-3 units (crs.)
Modern United States History Since 1877 (SS)
Survey of United States history from 1877; emergence of a modern industrial state, expansion abroad, First and Second World Wars, and role as a great power. (Fall-Spring)

History 203 1-3 units (crs.)
Honors: Modern United States History Since 1877 (SS)
Survey of United States history from 1877; emergence of a modern industrial state, expansion abroad, First and Second World Wars, and role as a great power. Prerequisite: University Honors student. (Fall-Spring)

History 204 3 units (crs.)
Honors: Early United States History to 1877
Early United States history will be examined within the framework of the new social history. Primary sources will be used to eliminate the relationship between myth and reality, to analyze national values and their origins, and to examine the struggle for national unity in a culturally diverse society.

History 302 3 units (crs.)
Ancient Greece
Greek civilization from the Homeric Age to Alexander. Greek democracy's triumphs and failures. Colonization of the Mediterranean, conflicts with Persia and between Greek city-states. The mind and expression of the Hellenic Age and its influence on the modern world.

History 303 3 units (crs.)
Roman History
Rome from earliest times to end of the Western Roman Empire. Political, social, economic, and intellectual aspects of the rise and fall of Roman civilization, with attention to the influences of the Etruscans, Greeks, and Carthaginians, as well as the influence of Rome on Western Culture.

History 304 3 units (crs.)
Early Middle Ages, 476-1122
Political, cultural, and institutional aspects of early medieval Europe. Among the topics of discussion will be the importance of the Church, the Byzantine and Islamic contributions, as well as the rise of feudalism.

History 305 3 units (crs.)
Late Middle Ages, 1122-1517
Political, cultural, and institutional aspects of the late Middle Ages. Among the topics of discussion will be the decline of feudalism, the birth of towns, the emergence of the national state, and the beginning of secularism.

History 306 3 units (crs.)
The Crusades
An examination of the social, economic, political, and religious motivations underlying the Crusading Movement from the eleventh to the fourteenth centuries. Particular attention will be devoted to contrasting views of the Crusades from the perspective of Christian, Moslem, and Jewish participants.

History 308 3 units (crs.)
Renaissance Europe
Cultural origins and achievements of the Renaissance. Political, economic and social conditions of Italy and the North, Art and Literature, origin of modern states, European expansion overseas, and Renaissance contributions to western culture.

History 310 3 units (crs.)
Reformation Europe
Political, social, economic, and intellectual bases of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. The development of modern states, rise of modern economics, science and technology. Reformation literature and art.

History 316 3 units (crs.)
Romanticism and Revolution in Europe
Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the Franco-Prussian War. Reaction, revolution, social classes, intellectual ferment, and development of ideologies.

History 318 3 units (crs.)
Modernism and Nationalism in Europe
European history from end of the Franco-Prussian War through World War I. Political, economic and cultural developments, social and intellectual history, the operation of forces of nationalism and democracy and causes of the Great War.

History 319 3 units (crs.)
Europe Since 1919
Europe since World War I. Political, economic, and cultural developments; fascism, communism, nazism; World War II; post-war efforts at European unity; the East-West conflict.

History 322 3 units (crs.)
European Absolutism
Studies the emergence and the politics of absolutist monarchical societies in Europe with emphasis on France in the 17th and 18th centuries.

History 323 3 units (crs.)
Old Regime, French Revolution and Napoleon, 1763-1815
Examines the collapse of the traditional monarchy and society in France, the revolutionary changes of 1789-99, and the domestic and international policies of Napoleon Bonparte from 1799-1815.

History 329 3 units (crs.)
Culture and Society in Eighteenth-Century Europe
This course examines the nature and interaction of elite culture and popular culture during the age of Enlightenment; how new forms of public discourse reflected and reformed an hierarchical social structure based on tradition, status and wealth.

History 340 3 units (crs.)
The Scientific Revolution, 1500-1800
Surveys the development of European early modern science and technology in context and in relation to their broad cultural effects.

History 341 3 units (crs.)
History of Wisconsin
Cultural, economic, political, and social history of Wisconsin. Meets cooperative requirement for education students.

History 342 3 units (crs.)
Environmental History
A survey of the major topics and issues in North American environmental history from the early native American experience through the twentieth century.

History 343 3 units (crs.)
The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and the Making of the African Diaspora, 1441-1807
Topics include slavery and economy in Africa, as well as the organization and structure of the slave trade in Africa and the diaspora. The course also examines important themes in the creation of the African diaspora, including religion and spirituality, kinship, "family", gender, sexuality, language oral tradition, resistance, and creolization. (3+0)

History 344 3 units (crs.)
Comparative Race Relations (NW)
This course focuses on the social and historical evolution of race in the United States, Brazil, and south Africa from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Topics include the origins of racial ideologies, the impact of race on science and medicine, the role of race in shaping political consciousness and nationhood, the multiple meanings of "reconciliation", and the contested meaning of race in the present day. (3+0)

History 350 3 units (crs.)
Modern East Europe
History of East-Central Europe, concentrating on Poland, the Czech lands, Slovakia and Hungary, from circa 1700 to the present. Topics include the emergence of nationalism and nationalism movements, relations with cultures to the west and east, 'modernization', war and the Holocaust, the Communist era, the fall of Communism and cultural, economic, political, religious and social developments within each area.

History 358 3 units (crs.)
Asian American History (ES)
A history of Asian Americans in the United States from the mid-19th century to the present. Peoples from China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, India and Southeast Asia will be examined.

History 361 3 units (crs.)
British America
English colonies in America, from 1607-1760, with particular attention to cultural, economic, and political foundations of American civilization.

History 362 3 units (crs.)
The American Revolution, 1760-1786
An examination of the revolutionary era in America. It traces the origins of the imperial crisis, the campaigns of the war of independence, loyalism, the citizen army, the British perspective on events, the foundations of the Republic and the social impact of the American Revolution.

History 364 3 units (crs.)
The Early Republic, 1787-1800
The Constitution and the Federalist administrations of George Washington and John Adams within the context of the republican vision of 1776 and the American environment and society in the last decade of the 18th century.

History 365 3 units (crs.)
The Age of Jefferson, 1800-1820
The genius, complexity, and statecraft of Thomas Jefferson through primary sources and biographies. Jeffersonian policy in the era of war and nationalism that followed his presidency.

History 366 3 units (crs.)
United States Democracy
An examination of the nature, practice and limits of democracy in mid-19th century United States. Nationalism/sectionalism, expansion, the market revolution, racism/slavery, party politics, women's work and status, reform and romanticism will be studied in order to assess the myth and reality of United States democracy in the antebellum era.

History 367 3 units (crs.)
The Civil War Era
The process of division, war, and reunion between the years 1845 and 1877. The social and economic structure of the United States in the antebellum era, evolution of the political crisis, Union and Confederate home fronts, narrative of battles, Black experience during war and peace, and politics of reunion.

History 368 3 units (crs.)
The Gilded Age 1870-1900
The transformation of life between in the United States between the Civil War and the 20th century. The rise of industry in the United States, working class response, creation of the urban society, settlement of the New West, transformation of agriculture, reassessment of sex roles, creation of a new political structure, and rise of United States as an international power.

History 369 3 units (crs.)
America Since World War II
An examination of the cultural, intellectual, political, economic and social trends that developed in the United States between American entry into the Second World War and the present. Includes the origins of the Cold War, McCarthyism, the civil rights movement; the counterculture and protest movements of the 1960s, modern feminism, the end of the Cold War, conservative resurgence.

History 370 3 units (crs.)
Russia to 1861 (NW)
This course will examine the social, political and economic development of Russia from the medieval era through 1855. Topics to be discussed include the rise and fall of the Kievan state, the impact of the Mongols, the rise of Muscovite absolutism and the steadily increasing influence of the West in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries which highlighted the need for drastic reforms in order for Russia to enter the modern age.

History 371 3 units (crs.)
Modern Russia (NW)
This course will examine the social, political and economic development of Russia from 1855 to the present. Topics to be discussed include the Era of Great Reforms, Russia's constitutional experiment, the impact of the First World War, Lenin and the Bolshevik seizure of power, Stalin and his attempt to construct a totalitarian state, the foreign and domestic policies of Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Gorbachev and the events which led to another Russian revolution in 1991.

History 372 3 units (crs.)
Medieval Britain to 1485
Society and institutions in Britain from Roman times to 1485. The development of the Church, the origin and decline of feudalism, the evolution of royal government and Parliament.

History 373 3 units (crs.)
Britain and Ireland 1485-1714
British and Irish history from 1485 to 1714. The rise of Protestantism, the Puritan revolution and its consequences, the beginning of overseas exploration/ colonization, and the union of England and Scotland.

History 374 3 units (crs.)
Britain and Ireland 1714-1914
British and Irish history from 1714-1914. Topics of discussion will be the growth of the cabinet system, the advent of the industrial revolution, the rise of democracy, and the founding of the second empire and Irish Home Rule.

History 375 3 units (crs.)
Traditional Japan (NW)
Japanese civilization from its origin to 1800. Early native developments, borrowing from China, the rise of the samurai and the development of shogunal governments through the mid-Edo period.

History 376 3 units (crs.)
Modern Japan (NW)
Rise of modern Japan against the background of 19th-century developments. The arrival of the West, Meiji restoration, industrialization, the rise of militarism, World War II, the American occupation, and Japan's emergence as a post-industrial economic power.

History 377 3 units (crs.)
Traditional China (NW)
Chinese civilization from its origin to 1800.

History 378 3 units (crs.)
Modern China (NW)
Chinese civilization from its origin to 1800.

History 379 3 units (crs.)
Imperial Germany
The movement for unification in Germany, focusing on the role of Prussia in creating the Second German Empire; domestic developments from 1871 to 1918, foreign affairs as they led to the First World War, and a description of the military struggles of the war that ended in Germany's defeat and the collapse of the empire.

History 380 3 units (crs.)
Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, 1919-1945
The rise of the Nazi Party and Adolf Hitler's role in the years from 1919 to 1932; the development and decline of the Third Reich from 1933 to 1945, analyzing politico-economic and socio-cultural policies of coordination; the events that triggered World War II; the military struggles that characterized the unfolding of the conflict.

History 381 3 units (crs.)
Latin America to 1825 (NW)
Colonial foundations based on fusion of Indian, Spanish, Portuguese, African and French cultures in Latin America; Colonial control by Spain, Portugal, and France; revolts for independence and search for national maturity.

History 382 3 units (crs.)
Modern Latin America (NW)
Political evolution of the twenty Latin American states; 19th century revolutions and economic invasions by industrial countries; effects of the world wars.

History 383 3 units (crs.)
Traditional Middle East, 330-1789
History and institutions of the Middle East from 330 to 1789. The rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire, Muhammad and the emergence of Islam; the establishment of the Turkish and Persian empires.

History 384 3 units (crs.)
Modern Middle East 1789-1979
The decline and fall of the Turkish and Persian empires, the imperial interests of the Great Powers; the advent of nationalism and Zionism.

History 385 3 units (crs.)
African American History (ES)
The Black experience from African origin to the present; the slave experience; African-American culture; the civil rights movement.

History 386 3 units (crs.)
Women in the United States
The status, work, role, and leadership activities of white, Native American and African American women in United States history. Exceptional women, and the feminist, suffrage, and liberation movements examined within the perspective of the life and attitudes of the mass of women in the United States. Prerequisite: History 201 or 202. Cross-listed: History 386/Women's Studies 386. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

History 387 3 units (crs.)
German Witch Craze of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
The origins of the witch craze, study of selected witch hunts; the factors that caused the witch craze to decline in the late 17th century. Cross-listed: History 387/Women's Studies 387. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

History 388 3 units (crs.)
Holocaust: Destruction of European Jews
The way in which the Nazi totalitarian dictatorship was able in Germany and elsewhere to pervert morality and justice in order to exterminate European Jewry in death camps such as Auschwitz, Treblinka, and Maidanek.

History 389 3 units (crs.)
German Spies
The workings of German government agencies charged with gathering intelligence and undertaking espionage and counterespionage; how the clandestine activities of these agencies exercised influence over their governments in making policy.

History 390 3 units (crs.)
Constitutional History of the United States
United States constitutional development from colonial origins to the present. Major Supreme Court decisions relative to economic problems, political issues and social trends throughout American history.

History 391 3 units (crs.)
Western Frontier
The westward expansion of the United States from the Mississippi to the Pacific Coast with attention to the cultural, political, and economic development of the region.

History 392 3 units (crs.)
Social and Intellectual History of United States 1607-1860
Thought and culture from Colonial period to the Civil War. Roles of religion, science, the arts, education, and the development of social values and mores in the United States.

History 393 3 units (crs.)
Modern United States Cultural and Intellectual History
American thought and culture since the late nineteenth century; roles of science, religion, the arts, and education in the development of social values and cultural perceptions with particular attention given to the effects of urbanization and industrialization.

History 394 3 units (crs.)
United States Economic History
From European discovery to the present; a survey of agriculture, manufacturing, labor, transportation, commerce and finance in the United States, and the role of government and human relations.

History 395 3 units (crs.)
United States Military History
American military history from Spanish conquest to present, including growth and development of military science and impact of military activity on history of the United States.

History 397 3 units (crs.)
American Foreign Relations to 1917
The history of American foreign relations from the colonial era until U.S. entry into World War I; examines the cultural, intellectual, political, economic and social forces that influenced the development of American foreign policy before U.S. emergence as a twentieth-century 'superpower.'

History 398 3 units (crs.)
American Foreign Relations from 1917 to the Present
The history of American foreign relations from U.S. entry into World War I until the present; examines the cultural, intellectual, political, economic and social forces that influenced the development of American foreign policy during and after U.S. emergence as a international 'superpower.'

History 399 1-6 units (crs.)
Internship in History
An individually arranged internship that enables students to gain practical experience as public historians in a variety of settings. The internship is intended for advanced students with extensive course work relating to History. Students will submit papers based upon their experiences and be evaluated by their supervisors. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and two upper-division history classes.

History 401 3 units (crs.)
Historiography and Historical Methods
An analysis of the conceptual frameworks employed by historians and the methods which historians have used to arrive at conclusions. Nature of history, evolution of the discipline of history, analysis of documents, process of drawing conclusions from evidence, use of different methodologies, and practical experience of writing history. Prerequisite: One 300-level history course.

History 411 3 units (crs.)
American History Seminar
An in-depth analysis of a given topic in American history. The topic will be announced each time course is offered. Students will be exposed to a variety of different materials including primary sources. A major paper will be required. Prerequisite: Senior status with a major in history.

History 412 3 units (crs.)
European History Seminar
An in-depth analysis of a given topic in European history. The topic will be announced each time course is offered. Students will be exposed to a variety of different materials including primary sources. A major paper will be required. Prerequisite: Senior status with major in history.

History 413 2-3 units (crs.)
Non-Western History Seminar
An in-depth analysis of a given topic in non-Western history. The topic will be announced each time course is offered. Students will be exposed to a variety of different materials including primary sources. A major paper will be required. Prerequisite: Senior status with a major in history.

History 446 1-3 units (crs.)
Independent Study
See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

History 448 3 units (crs.)
Special Topics
Selected topics in history.

History 456 1-3 units (crs.)
Related Readings
See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

History 474 1-6 units (crs.)
Honors: Thesis
Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be 'Honors Thesis.' Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Prerequisite: University Honors status and junior standing. Maximum of 6
units (crs.).
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Last Updated July 1, 2001