UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN OSHKOSH

COLLEGE OF
EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES


Carmen I. Coballes-Vega, Dean
Office: Nursing/Education 113
Telephone: 920-424-3322

Michael P. Ford, Associate Dean
Office: Nursing/Education 113
Telephone: 920-424-3324

Barbara J. Cook, Director
Professional Education Program
Office: Nursing/Education 113
Telephone: 920-424-0115

MaryBeth Petesch, Director
Office of Field Experiences and Internships
Office: Nursing/Education 113
Telephone: 920-424-3323

Department Chairpersons

Margaret J. Olson, Counselor Education
Telephone: 920-424-1475
Ava McCall, Curriculum and Instruction
Telephone: 920-424-2477
Anthony Koyzis, Educational Foundations
Telephone: 920-424-1490
Janet Hagen, Human Services and Professional Leadership
Telephone: 920-424-1490
Judy C. Lambert, Reading Education
Telephone: 920-424-4444
Craig R. Fiedler, Special Education
Telephone: 920-424-3421

Service Center Directors

Byron Malsin, Center for Career Development and Employability Training
Telephone: 920-424-3034
Polly Montgomery, Fox Valley Writing Project
Telephone: 920-424-3325
Nancy Samida, Head Start Project
Telephone: 920-424-2166
William Kitz, Project Success
Telephone: 920-424-1033
Victoria Haydock, Reading Study Center
Telephone: 920-424-1031
Peg Hamblin, CESA 6 Media Center
Telephone: 920-424-3418
Penny Reed, Wisconsin Assistive Technology Initiative
Telephone: 920-424-2251

PHILOSOPHY OF THE COLLEGE
The College of Education and Human Services is committed to providing its students with quality instruction in degree programs that are designed to prepare graduates for employment in a variety of educational settings. The College is highly responsive to changing societal needs and provides programs which enable students to obtain the broadest possible professional preparation, without sacrificing the depth of training which is so essential to prospective employers.

Established over one hundred years ago, the College has developed an outstanding reputation based on the exceptional quality of its graduates.

I. FACULTY

Adams, Chiang, Christian-Smith, Cimera, Clark, Coballes-Vega, Cramer, Drecktrah, Erdman, Fast, Fiedler, Fischer, Fluharty, Ford, Frisch, Garcia, Genisio, Hagen, Hankes, Hargis, Havens, Henn-Reinke, Hones, Kader, Kisubi, Kitz, Koyzis, Lambert, Lampe, Lemberger, Leung, Liske, Marchel, McCall, Meyerson, Morrison, Muench, Olson, Paxton, Petronicolos, Rettig, Rose, Rylance, Saginak K., Saginak M., Scanlan, Shearer, Simmons, Stiver, Swanger, Tapley, Tipps, Urofsky, Wineberg, Winterfeldt

II. DEGREES

Undergraduate: A major in Education or Human Services can lead to the degree Bachelor of Science in Education or Bachelor of Science in Human Services. Music Education majors earn the Bachelor of Music Education; Art Education majors earn the Bachelor of Fine Arts.

Graduate: Students who complete a major in the College may want to continue in a graduate program, leading to the degrees Master of Science, Master of Science in Education, or students may wish to consider advanced study in other Colleges at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. For specifics, please see the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Graduate Bulletin.

III. SUMMARY OF FIELDS OF STUDY

1. GOAL(S)
See the department for a listing of their goal(s).

2. THE MAJOR(S)
The College offers 6 majors. These are: 1) Elementary Education, 2) English as a Second Language (ESL), 3) Human Services, 4) Broadfield Natural Science, 5) Broadfield Social Science, 6) Special Education Cross Categorical (Cognitive Disabilities [CD], Emotional/Behavioral Disorders [ED], and Learning Disabilities [LD]), 7) Dual Elementary 1-6 and Special Education Cross Categorical (CD, ED, LD), 8) Dual Early Childhood Pk-3 and Special Education Birth Through Age 8.

The College does not offer a Secondary Education major as such. It does provide programs leading to licensure to teach at the secondary (6-12, 9-12, and PK-12) levels. University of Wisconsin Oshkosh licenses teachers within the following areas: Adaptive Physical Education, African American Studies, Anthropology, Art, Bilingual Education: Hmong, Bilingual Education: Spanish, Biology, Chemistry, Coaching, Computer Science, Drama Education, Earth Science, Economics, English, English as a Second Language, French, Geography, German, Health, History, Journalism, Latin American Studies, Library Science, Mathematics, Music Education, Natural Science (Broadfield), Philosophy, Physical Education, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Social Science (Broadfield), Sociology, Spanish, Speech Communications Education.

3. THE MINOR(S)
The College offers 8 minors. Within the Education Major, these are: 1) Elementary Language Arts, 2) Elementary Social Science, 3) Elementary Science, 4) Library Science, 5) Reading, 6) English as a Second Language, 7) Bilingual Education Spanish, and 8) Bilingual Education Hmong.

A list of licensable minors including those offered by departments in the College of Letters and Science are available from Education Advisors in Dempsey 130.

4. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
The Professional Education Program has been designed to provide an undergraduate degree in four years, graduate unit (cr.) and licensure in five. The program provides high performance standards, with strong liberal arts components, and professional education requirements including some graduate level studies, extensive field experience requirements, additional licensure alternatives, entrance (PPST), and exit testing, and post licensure follow-up.

Because of the calendar (14 weeks with 3-week interims and summer school options) there are varied plans available to students for gaining licensure. Among them are:
1). An undergraduate degree with licensure and graduate units (crs.) in five years.
2). An undergraduate degree, with extra term units (crs.) and a summer session, earning licensure and graduate units (crs.) in 4-1/2 years

The program provides undergraduate degrees for elementary (PK-3, PK-6, 1-6, 1-9, 5-9), secondary (6-12, 9-12, PK-12), special education (PK-9, PK-12), elementary and special education dual (Elementary PK-3 with ECSE or Elementary 1-6 with special education cross categorical (CD, ED, LD). Licensure in these areas is earned, usually in one more year, upon completion of Admission II program requirements, student teaching, and required graduate coursework. Students may elect to graduate prior to Admission II or to graduate upon completion of all licensure requirements:

Many of the graduate units (crs.) necessary for licensure are applicable to one or more of the graduate programs in education at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Consult your advisor(s) and the Graduate Bulletin.

Students who transfer to or re-enter the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh after July 1, l992 will be required to complete the licensure requirements of the Professional Education Program.

5. COOPERATIVE URBAN TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM
Cultural diversity is increasing in urban school districts, in the Fox Valley and throughout the country. Thus, the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and Milwaukee Area Technical College have joined together to offer the Cooperative Urban Teacher Education Program to talented students who wish to become teachers. Black, Hispanic, American Indian and Asian students are especially encouraged to consider the cooperative program. Students of color who are eligible for admission to the general education program at MATC and want to become teachers may enroll.

The program offers students the opportunity to begin their college education in their own backyard. When students join the Cooperative Teacher Education Program, they enroll in the General Education Curriculum at MATC in liberal arts coursework, level 200 and above. Students may earn an Associate of Arts degree at MATC or may earn a minimum of 40 term hours of unit (cr.) to be eligible to enroll in upper-level courses at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh.

After completion of a minimum of 45 term hours of unit (cr.) at MATC, students then enroll at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. An additional two to three years of coursework is needed to complete the program, depending upon the students' class standing when they transferred to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Upon successful completion of the program, students receive a bachelor's degree in education. They also receive graduate unit (cr.) and are eligible to apply for Wisconsin State Teacher Licensure.

Students who meet the requirements outlined below will be considered for admission to the College of Education and Human Services at University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Admission to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh does not guarantee admission to the Professional Education Program (PEP) in the College of Education and Human Services. There are a limited number of students admitted biannually. Direct questions to the Director of PEP, Nur/Ed 113.

The requirements are as follows:
  • Application for admission and supporting documentation
  • Completion of a minimum of 40 term hours of 200-level courses approved as meeting the course requirements for pre-education at MATC and a cumulative grade point average of 2.75 or above
  • Letter providing a rationale for the selection of a career in education
  • Two letters of recommendation (non-family), including one from a teacher
  • Passing scores on the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST)

Exceptions Policy: To be considered for the DPI allowable 10% exceptions, a student must meet all of the criteria listed:
  • Pass two parts of the test
  • Miss the third part by no more than three points
  • Take the part of the test not passed at least three times
  • Earn a 2.75 cumulative GPA
To further appeal the Exceptions Policy for the PPST, contact Barbara Cook.

  • Demonstrated proficiency in English, mathematics and communication skills
  • Disclosure Statement regarding criminal history
  • Receipt permitting criminal background check
  • Additional evidence and interviews as determined by departments

Benefits of the Cooperative Program include:
Continuous interaction with faculty, staff and students from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and MATC regarding course selection and program requirements.

An opportunity to become familiar with the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh before enrolling in classes.

Guaranteed equal consideration into the College of Education and Human Services at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh upon successful completion of 40 term hours of unit (cr.) at MATC (as previously outlined).

For more information or to make arrangements for your visit, please contact the Admissions Office, Dempsey 135, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh WI 54901-8602 or call 920-424-0202.

6. ARTICULATION AGREEMENT BETWEEN COEHS HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM AND FOX VALLEY TECHNICAL COLLEGE
Students who complete an associate degree in Alcohol or Other Drug Abuse at Fox Valley Technical College may transfer up to 15 credits of General Education courses and a 21 credit Substance Abuse Minor to a degree in Human Services. For further information, please contact Karen Bowen, Academic Advisment, Dempsey 130, 920-424-1025.

IV. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS OF THE COLLEGE

Students seeking admission to the College of Education and Human Services must meet the minimum requirements as listed. Additional criteria for selecting students for various licensure programs may be required. Admission to the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh does not guarantee admission to the Professional Education Program (PEP) in the College of Education and Human Services. There are a limited number of students admitted biannually. Direct questions to the Director of PEP, Nur/Ed 113.

Any student, undergraduate or graduate, seeking admission to any program in the College of Education and Human Services, UW Oshkosh with a field experience component must submit a disclosure statement and a receipt for a criminal background check, with the application materials before being permitted to enter the field.

1.Professional Education Program requires two admission processes. To be considered for each admission level students must complete the requirements as listed:
ADMISSION I - Admission to the College of Education:
  • Current enrollment in Elementary Education/ Secondary Education 201 or sophomore practicum at time of application.
  • Enrollment in coursework at UW Oshkosh or University of Wisconsin Colleges during the term in which application is made
  • Licensure areas declared
  • Application Form for Admission I
  • Professional Statement
  • Two recommendations (teacher and other)
  • Speech and Listening competencies (Communication 111 Fundamentals of Speech with a grade of “C” or better)
  • Passing scores on PreProfessional Skills Test (PPST)


Pass Scores

PPST

Reading-175

Mathematics-173

Writing-174
 
CBT

Reading-322

Mathematics-318

Writing-320

  • Disclosure Statement regarding criminal history
  • Receipt permitting criminal background check
  • 2.75 GPA on 40 units (crs.) or more
  • Additional evidence and interviews as determined by departments
  • A TB test within one year of application for Admission I.

Make application for Admission I to the Office of Professional Education, Nur/Ed 113.
Application Timelines: September 15 and February 15.

ADMISSION II - Admission to student teaching and graduate courses:
  • Completion of all undergraduate course work
  • Satisfactory completion of clinical experiences
  • 3.00 GPA required in major, minor, professional and cumulative
  • Satisfactory completion of the human relations requirement
  • Additional evidence and interviews as determined by departments

Internships/Overseas Student Teaching:
Students interested in an internship or overseas student teaching must meet the requirements listed below and complete a separate application. For further information, please contact one of the staff in the Field Experience Office.

To be considered for these field experiences a student must:
  • be enrolled in or have completed all undergraduate course work prior to student teaching and have a positive clinical experience recommendation without any noted deficiencies
  • earn a 3.50 professional grade point average for an internship or a 3.25 professional grade point average for overseas student teaching, a 3.10 major grade point average, a 3.10 minor grade point average, a 3.10 cumulative grade point average

Out of Area Student Teaching
Out of Area Student Teaching approved by the respective departments for three compelling reasons: health, spousal relocation, or involvement in an urban experience. Specific GPA required.

Make application for Admission II to the Office of Professional Education, Nur/Ed 113.

2. Admission to the Practicum in Special Education
Requirements include:
  • Completion of 45 term units (crs.)
  • A GPA of 2.75 on all courses attempted at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and other college level institutions. Depending upon term enrollments and program resources, not all students who seek admission to the Practicum in Special Education will necessarily be admitted, even when minimum criteria are met
  • Completion of English 101, Mathematics 110 and Communication 111

Make application to the Special Education Department, Nur/Ed 405.

3. Admission to the Human Services Program
Students may be admitted into the Human Services program and the Intermediate Field Experience when the following requirements have been met:
  • Major GPA of 2.75
  • Cumulative GPA of 2.50 and 60 units (crs.) earned
  • Completion of a minimum of three courses in the Human Services major, two of which must be: Human Services 203 Introduction to Human Services and Human Services 310 Interpersonal Relations in the Helping Professions
  • Recommendation by the Human Services Admissions Committee, independent of the course grades received by the applicant
Applications will be reviewed and acted on by the Human Services Admissions Committee in March and October.

Exceptions to the above admissions policy will be made on an individual basis by petition to and recommendation of the admissions committee.

4. Admission to Human Services Major Field Experience
Students will be admitted into the Human Services Major Field Experience under the following conditions:
  • Cumulative GPA of 2.75
  • Human Services major GPA of 3.00
  • Completion of the following courses:
Human Services 203 Introduction to Human Services
Human Services 310 Interpersonal Relations and Helping Professions
Human Services 315 Value Development in Human Services
Human Services 320 Human Behavior and the Human Services
Human Services 325 Intermediate Field Experience in Human Services
Human Services 340 Social Issues and Human Services
Human Services 350 Task Group Strategies in Human Services
Human Services 360 Program Planning and Evaluation
Human Services 410 Laboratory in Human Services Strategies (may be taken concurrently)
Human Services 415 Legal and Ethical Aspects in Human Services
  • Recommendation by the Human Services Admissions Committee, independent of the course grades received by the applicant.

Comment:
The Human Services GPA will be calculated on all units (crs.) attempted in courses identified by the program as applicable to the Human Services major.

Exceptions to the above admissions policy will be made on an individual basis by petition to and recommendation of the admissions committee.

V. REQUIRED CORE COURSES

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS - COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES PROSPECTIVE GRADUATES
Licensure to teach in the public schools in the State of Wisconsin requires the completion of the Bachelor of Science in Education degree or a Bachelor of Music Education or Bachelor of Fine Arts requirements, plus the program and licensure requirements of the College of Education and Human Services and the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

Included in those requirements are:

All designated University General Education Requirements (GER) for a degree in the College of Education and Human Services must include the following:

Communication
  • Communication 111 Fundamentals of Speech Communication 3 cr.

English (6 units (crs.), three from each group)
  • English 101 College English I 3 cr. OR
  • English 110 Honors: Composition 3 cr. OR
  • English 111 Critical Reading and Writing 3 cr.

  • English 202 College English II 3 cr. OR
  • English 302 Advanced Composition the Humanities 3 cr. OR
  • English 307 Language and Rhetoric 3 cr. OR
  • English 316 Advanced Composition for the Social Sciences 3 cr. OR
  • English 318 Advanced Composition for the Sciences 3 cr. OR
  • English 321 Composition/Elementary and Special Education 3 cr.

Non-Western Culture
  • 3 units (crs.) from General Education list
Physical Education
  • Physical Education and Health Promotion 105 Active Lifestyle 2 cr.

Political Science
  • Political Science 175 National, State and Local Government in the United States 3 cr.

Some of the licensure programs require the completion of specific courses which meet a portion of the General Education Requirements, but for completion of other General Education Requirements, students must consult the list of approved General Education courses.

Curriculum Core Courses which consist of the following undergraduate and graduate course work:

Educational Foundations
  • Educational Foundations 235 Child and Adolescent Development 3 cr.
  • Educational Foundations 380 Educational Psychology 3 cr.
  • Educational Foundations 412 Teaching as a Profession: Legal and Ethical Aspects 3 cr.

Professional Leadership
  • Educational Leadership 205 Introduction to Microcomputers in Education 1 cr. (or test-out option)
  • Educational Leadership 325 Instructional Technology 3 cr.

Special Education
  • Special Education 352 Children and Youth with Disabilities in General Education3 cr.

Educational Foundations
  • Educational Foundations 703 Education and the Making of American Society 3 cr.
  • Educational Foundations 706 Multicultural Education 3 cr.

Additional licensure requirements include program specific coursework and assessment as determined by the Department of Public Instruction and the College of Education and Human Services.

HUMAN RELATIONS CODE
Licensure by the Department of Public Instruction also requires the completion of the Department of Public Instruction's Human Relations requirement. This requirement is fulfilled through undergraduate and graduate coursework and a field experience of direct involvement with approved community groups. The Field Experience Office of the College of Education and Human Services provides information and procedures for meeting these requirements as well as placement opportunities for the field experience. The Human Relations Code must be completed prior to Admission II.

STUDENT TEACHING
The minimum amount of student teaching requires full-day, eighteen-week assignments in conformance with the school year calendar of the cooperating school.

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS - ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
The Elementary Education curriculum may lead to licensure in several areas. Those areas include Preschool, Kindergarten through Grade 3; Preschool, Kindergarten through Grade 6; Grades 1-6; Grades 1-8; or Grades 5-9. Students seeking licensure in an area of Elementary Education and an area of Special Education should select the Dual (Elementary and Special Education) Major.

Elementary Education students will also be licensed to teach in their minor(s) in accordance with the grade levels they have selected as their major; for example, a student seeking Elementary Education, grades 1-6, with a mathematics minor will also be licensed to teach mathematics through grade 6. Exceptions: Students seeking Elementary Education through Grade 8 will be licensed in their minor(s) through Grade 9, except for Bilingual/Bicultural Spanish and Hmong Minors whose licensures are 1-8. Students seeking licensure in Preschool, Kindergarten through Grade 3, will be required to complete a minor. Students completing a minor in Library Science will be licensed in grades PK-12 in that minor.

The curriculum for all areas of Elementary Education consists of several components which include the following:
1. all requirements listed in General Education Requirements, Curriculum Core Courses, Additional licensure requirements;
2. a minor in a licensable academic area of study; students seeking licensure in grades 5-9 are required to complete two minors.

Additional coursework is also required and varies in accordance with the grade levels of licensure sought. Those requirements include:
1. specific coursework in health, humanities, library science, mathematics, music, natural sciences and biology, the social sciences and history;
2. specific coursework in art methods, elementary education, music methods, physical education methods, reading education, special education;
3.specific graduate coursework;
4.student teaching at the appropriate levels for the minimum of 18 weeks, full days.
All students seeking a license in any area of Elementary Education should meet with an advisor in the Academic Advisement Office, Dempsey 130, to obtain a complete requirements worksheet and the listing of approved licensable minors.

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS - SECONDARY EDUCATION
The curriculum in Secondary Education may lead to licensure to teach in specific subject areas in grades 6-12, 9-12, or Preschool Kindergarten-12. While most academic majors lead to licensure to teach in grades 6-12 or 9-12, the following majors provide licensure in grades PK-12: Art, Music, Physical Education. Foreign Language (French, German, and Spanish) licensure is available at the 6-12, 9-12, or PK-12 levels.

Secondary Education students must complete both an academic licensable major and a minor or two licensable majors. Physical Education majors must select a minor other than Coaching. Art and Music majors are not required to complete a minor.

Factors to consider in selecting a minor are the student's aptitudes and interests. The job market is another worthwhile consideration. Students are required to discuss major/minor combinations with an advisor.

In addition to all requirements in General Education Requirements, Curriculum Core Courses, Additional Licensure Requirements, students seeking 6-12, 9-12 or PK-12 licensure must also complete:
1) A licensable major and minor
2) General Education courses to include
  • Art, Music or Drama: course from General Education Humanities list
  • Biology: course from General Education Natural Science list
  • History: History 102, 201 or 202
  • Literature: from General Education Humanities list
  • Mathematics: 3 units (crs.) from Mathematics 102, 103, 107 or exemption
  • Natural Science: (not Biology) from General Education list
  • Philosophy: Philosophy 105 or 109
3) Education: Secondary Education 201, 402, 732, Reading Education 435, 440, (English majors and minors and PK-12 Art, Music, Physical Education Majors are not required to complete Reading Education 435.)
4) Specific graduate coursework

ADDITIONAL LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS - SECONDARY EDUCATION
Students seeking 6-12 or 9-12 licensure must also complete:

3.Education: Secondary Education 356, 357, 358, 359, 361, 362 or 363, Secondary Education 450, 451
4.Health: Health Education 405

Students seeking PK-12 licensure must include:
  • Education: Secondary Education 366, 367, 370, 371 or 372, Secondary Education 460, 461
  • Health: Health Education 401 or 405

Secondary education students must take specific courses required for licensure in accordance with their choice of major and minor. The following list indicates those courses as well as the areas and levels of licensure available.

African-American Studies Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337, Biology 104, History 341
Anthropology Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337, Biology 104, Environmental Studies 211 or Geography 314 or Geology 150, History 341
Art Major (PK-12): Art 354, Art 356
Bilingual Education Hmong (6-12, 9-12, PK-12): Elementary/Secondary Education 346, verified fluency in foreign language
Bilingual Education Spanish(6-12, 9-12, PK-12): Elementary/Secondary Education 346, verified fluency in Spanish
Biology Major or Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 339, 340 (majors only), Biology 104, Environmental Studies 211, Geography 314 or Geology 150
Broad Field Natural Science Major (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 339, 340, Biology 104, Environmental Studies 211, Geography 314 or Geology 150
Broad Field Social Science Major (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337, 338, Biology 104, Environmental Studies 211, Geography 314 or Geology 150 , History 341
Chemistry Major or Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 339, 340 (majors only), Biology 104, Environmental Studies 211, Geography 314 or Geology 150
Coaching Minor (PK-12): none
Communication Major or Minor [Speech Communication Education]: (6-12; 9-12): Communication 441
Computer Science Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 341
Earth Science Major or Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 339, 340 (majors only), Biology 104, Geography 314 or Geology 150
Economics Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337, Biology 104, Environmental Studies 211, Geography 314 or Geology 150, History 341
English Major or Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 335, 336 (majors only)
English as a Second Language (6-12; 9-12; PK-12): Elementary Education 346, Secondary Education 346
Foreign Language Major or Minor [French, German, Spanish] (6-12; 9-12; PK-12): Secondary Education 347, four semesters of foreign language or verified fluency in foreign language

Students may be licensed to teach Foreign Language in PK-12 by completing the following additional courses: Elementary Education 330, and the choice of one of the following: Elementary Education 311, Reading Education 305. Student teaching at the elementary level is also required.

Geography Major or Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337, 338 (majors only), Biology 104, Environmental Studies 211, Geography 314 or Geology 150 , History 341
Health Minor (6-12; 9-12); if combined with Physical Education, (PK-12): Health Education 308
History Major or Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337, 338 (majors only), Biology 104, Environmental Studies 211, Geography 314 or Geology 150, History 341
Journalism Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 496
Latin American Studies Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337, Biology 104, Geography 314 or Geology 150, History 341
Library Science Minor (PK-12): none
Mathematics Major or Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 341, 342 (majors only)
Music Education Major
  • Choral (6-12; 9-12): Music 385
  • General (PK-12): Music 384, Music 386
  • Instrumental (PK-12): Music 301, Music 302
Philosophy Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 335
Physical Education Major (PK-12): Physical Education and Health Promotion 392
Physics Major or Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 339, 340 (majors only), Biology 104, Geography 314 or Geology 150
Political Science Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337, Biology 104, Geography 314 or Geology 150, History 341
Psychology Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337
Religious Studies Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337
Sociology Minor (6-12; 9-12): Secondary Education 337, Biology 104, Geography 314 or Geology 150, History 341

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS - SPECIAL EDUCATION
The Special Education curriculum offers licensure in two areas: (1) Cross Categorical Special Education Licensure: Middle Childhood through Early Adolescence (ages 6-13) and (2) Cross Categorical Special Education Licensure: Early Adolescence through Adolescence (ages 10-21). Early Childhood Special Education (ages birth through 8) licensure is offered through the Dual Program.

The Cross Categorical Special Education licensure program prepares individuals to teach in a classroom serving students who are identified as having either LD, ED, or CD. In the Cross Categorical Special Education licensure program, students must complete a concentration in one of the disability categorical areas of LD, ED, or CD. This area of concentration work will be completed through a portfolio process interwoven throughout the Cross Categorical Special Education licensure course work. The Cross Categorical licensure areas can be combined to create a multiple level licensure.

Early Childhood Special Education licensure prepares individuals to teach in classrooms serving children with disabilities ages birth through 8. The ECSE licensure also requires that a portfolio process be completed by the end of your program.

Department of Special Education Student Achievement Goals

Upon completion of a Special Education major, undergraduate students will be able to demonstrate 1) adequacy in the knowledge base for effectively teaching and managing individuals with exceptional education needs. Further, undergraduate students will demonstrate effective teaching strategies, professional qualities, and classroom management skills for individuals with exceptional education needs in field placements. 2) Knowledge and application of basic competencies in: (1) philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of special education; (2) characteristics of learners with exceptional education needs; (3) assessment, diagnosis, and evaluation; (4) instructional content and practice; (5) planning and managing the teaching and learning environment; (6) managing student behavior and social interaction skills; (7) communication and collaborative partnerships; (8) professionalism and ethical practices; and (9) competence in written and oral communication, using appropriate special education terminology and concepts.

The curriculum for Special Education consists of several components which include all requirements in General Education Requirements, Curriculum Core Courses, Additional Licensure Requirements. Additional coursework is also required and varies in accordance with the certification and the grade levels sought. Those requirements include:
  1. specific coursework in health, humanities, mathematics, music, natural sciences, social sciences and history, and biology;
  2. specific education coursework in elementary education, reading education, special education;
  3. specific graduate coursework;
  4. student teaching at the appropriate levels for the minimum of 18 weeks, full days.


All students seeking a license in any program area of Special Education should meet with an advisor in the Academic Advisement Office, Dempsey 130, to obtain a complete requirements worksheet.

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS - DUAL (ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION)
The Dual Elementary and Special Education Cross Categorical Major leads to licensure in one area of elementary education and special education cross categorical (CD, ED, LD). Students may also be dually licensed in Preschool-Kindergarten-3 (PK-3) and Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE). Students in the Dual Major do not take an academically-oriented minor.

The curriculum for all areas of the Dual Major consists of several components which include all requirements listed in the section entitled “REQUIRED CORE COURSES.”

Additional coursework is also required and varies with the areas of licensure: (PK-3 or 1-6) and (ECSE or Special Education Cross Categorical [CD, ED, LD] Middle Childhood through Early Adolescence):
  1. specific coursework in health, humanities, human services and professional leadership, mathematics, music, natural sciences and biology, the social sciences and history;
  2. specific coursework in art methods, elementary education, music methods, physical education methods reading education, special education;
  3. specific graduate coursework;
  4. student teaching at the appropriate levels and areas for the minimum of 18 weeks, full days.


All students in the Dual Major seek a license in one area of elementary education and one area of special education. All Dual Majors should see an Education advisor in the Academic Advisement Office, Dempsey 130, to obtain a complete requirements worksheet.

LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS - BACCALAUREATE DEGREE HOLDERS
The College of Education and Human Services offers opportunities for individuals with non-teaching baccalaureate degrees to become licensed to teach in any of the programs offered. Individuals who are already licensed to teach are also able to extend their licensure to include additional grade levels or a new major(s) or minor(s).

In elementary and secondary education the student can complete this program at the undergraduate level. Students should contact an advisor at 920-424-1025 or 920-424-3234 for information about licensure. Students wishing to be licensed in Special Education must enroll in the graduate program. Where programs exist, the student should consider the advantages of completing a graduate program to meet the new educational standards. Contact the Graduate School Office, Dempsey 330, 920-424-1223, for information regarding the Special Education programs.

Each person seeking licensure in the above context is usually unique and therefore the requirements to be met cannot be listed here. Students seeking licensure at the secondary level should apply for undergraduate admission to the University and furnish official undergraduate transcripts of all collegiate level work. Upon acceptance by the University, an evaluation of transcripts will be done. Students should then request a unit (cr.) check from an advisor in Dempsey 130. When completed, a copy of the unit (cr.) check is sent to the student indicating all requirements to be met. At this point a conference with an advisor in the Academic Advisement Office, Dempsey 130, to plan the student's program is suggested (920-424-1025 or 920-424-3234). For Special Education students, the unit (cr.) check is done by the graduate coordinator in the Special Education Department and all advisement is handled by that department (920-424-3421). For graduate level elementary students, the unit (cr.) check is done by the graduate coordinator in the Curriculum and Instruction Department and all advisement is handled by the department (920-424-2477).

VI. THE MAJOR(S), WITH EMPHASES AND/OR OPTIONS

1. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJOR
See Licensure Requirements

2. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) MAJOR

The English as a Second Language major (PK-3, PK-6, 1-6, 1-8) requires an Elementary Education (PK-3, PK-6, 1-6, 1-8) licensable major, with Elementary Education PK-3 and 1-6 licensure strongly recommended, as these prepare teachers more specifically for work with young children.

The English as a Second Language major (6-12) requires a licensable 6-12 minor. The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh strongly recommends that ESL 6-12 majors have minors in the natural sciences, the social sciences, or math. This content area licensure has been strongly recommended by area school districts for teachers who wish to be hired, as it will increase their effectiveness in meeting the academic needs of second language learners. Some school districts require licensure in math, social studies, or science, to be hired as a 6-12 ESL teacher.

In addition, English as a Second Language majors are recommended to consider the following in selecting their minors:
  • Examine which courses are currently offered in elementary, middle and high school, then choose a minor on the basis of what is actually taught.
  • Many districts also look favorably on a minor which honors cultural diversity.
  • A second minor in Bilingual Education/Hmong or Bilingual Education/Spanish is recommended for students who are fluent in Hmong or Spanish.

Recommended Minors with ESL (6-12) Major:
  • 6-12 licensure with a minor in the Natural Sciences: Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Geography, Physics
  • 6-12 licensure with a minor in the Social Sciences: Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Latin American Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology
  • 6-12 licensure with other minors: Math

Required Units (crs.): 40 minimum

Required Courses:
Education
  • Elementary Education/Secondary Education:Elementary Education/Secondary Education 348, 349, 351, 352

Language, Linguisitcs and Communication
  • English: English 384
  • Communication: Communication 259
  • English/Spanish/Communication: (two of the following): English 301, 341, 452, Spanish 307, Communication 265, 389, 465

Cross-cultural, Social and Historical Issues
  • Elementary Education/Secondary Education: Elementary Education/Secondary Education 353
  • Two of the following:
  • Anthropology: Anthropology 122, 232, 274, 312, 324,
  • Communication: Communication 318
  • Geography: Geography 111, 316
  • History: History 358, 382
  • International Studies: International Studies 321
  • Political Science: Political Science 304
  • Religious Studies: Religious Studies 102
  • Spanish: Spanish 335

Other Requirements:
Four semesters of foreign language or verified fluency in foreign language.
Elementary Education/Secondary Education: Elementary Education/Secondary Education 346
Elementary Education/Secondary Education: Elementary Education 360 or Secondary Education 363
ESL Major Student Teaching and Problems 12 units (crs.)

3. HUMAN SERVICES MAJOR
Recommended for students who are preparing for, or currently hold, positions in human service agencies and institutions.

Required Units (crs.): 40 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Human Service and Professional Leadership: Human Services 203, 310, 315, 320, 325, 340, 350, 360, 410, 415, 420, 421, 422

In addition to the regular day classes, most major coursework is offered periodically during the evening.

Other Requirements: 3 units (crs.) taken from an approved list of courses. See an academic advisor (Dempsey 130) for the options available.

4. BROADFIELD NATURAL SCIENCE MAJOR
Recommended for students who want broad exposure to the natural science field.

Required Units (crs.): 60 minimum

Required Courses: 54 units (crs.) in science to include:
  • A minor in one of the following areas of science: Biology (25 cr.), Chemistry (23 cr.), Earth Science (24 cr.) or Physics (25 cr.).
  • A minimum of 14 units (crs.) in one of the above science areas which has not been selected for the minor and a minimum of 8 units (crs.) in each of the two remaining science areas. See the academic advisors for lists of those courses approved for meeting the 14-unit (cr.) and 8-unit (cr.) requirements.
  • A minimum of 6 units (crs.) of Mathematics at the level of Mathematics 103 and Mathematics 104 or above.

Electives: Sufficient to meet the Minimum Requirement.
All electives must be science courses.

Comment:
Students can obtain licensure to teach Mathematics in grades 6-9 by completing the following courses:
  • Curriculum and Instruction: Elementary Education 384 or Secondary Education 341
  • Mathematics: Mathematics 108, 110, 211, 413, 415; 4 units (crs.) from Mathematics 317 and 349. For Mathematics 108, 5 units (crs.) may be earned by examination

Students whose high school backgrounds identify them as having advanced preparation in Mathematics will be given an opportunity to complete the Mathematics 110 requirement by earning 2 units (crs.) by examination.

5. BROADFIELD SOCIAL SCIENCE MAJOR
Recommended for students who wish broad field social studies licensure to teach in grades 6-12 or 9-12 social studies fusion courses plus the minor area in a social science discipline.

Required Units (crs.): 54 minimum

Required Courses:


     Option A - 56 units (crs.) minimum to include:
     32 units (crs.) in social science which must include at least
     6 units (crs.) from each of four of the following social
     science areas:

     Anthropology, Economics, Cultural Geography,
     Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or
     International Studies courses (International Studies 205,
     206, 308 341 or 399) 2 cr.



     Option B - 54 units (crs.) minimum to include:
     A minor in one of the following social sciences:
     Anthropology, Economics, Cultural Geography,
     Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology
     History - 6 units (crs.)
     26 units (crs.) which must include at least 6 units (crs.)
     from each of 3 of the following social sciences (not to
     include area chosen as minor):
     Anthropology, Economics, Cultural Geography,
     Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or
     International Studies courses (International Studies 205,
     206, 308, 341 or 399) 26 cr.


Comment:
Students can obtain licensure to teach Language Arts in grades 6-9 by completing the following courses:
  • Curriculum and Instruction: Elementary Education 311
  • English: English 211, 212, 213, 214, 223
  • Reading: Reading Education 305
  • Speech: Communication 111 or 427

6. SPECIAL EDUCATION MAJOR (CROSS CATEGORICAL – CD, ED, LD)
Recommended for students who wish to be a licensed to teach Special Education Cross Categorical. Students will be licensed to teach children identified as CD, ED or LD.

Required Courses: See Licensure Requirements.

Comment:
It is recommended that you work with an advisor throughout your entire program to assure proper sequencing of coursework.

7. DUAL (ELEMENTARY 1-6 AND SPECIAL EDUCATION CROSS CATEGORICAL [CD, ED, LD])
See Licensure Requirements
8. DUAL EARLY CHILDHOOD PK-3 AND SPECIAL EDUCATION BIRTH THROUGH AGE 8
See Licensure Requirements

VII. MINOR(S)

All elementary and secondary education students except art and music are required to complete a licensable minor. A list of licensable minors is available from Education Advisors in Dempsey 130. Specific minors offered by the College of Education and Human Services, available only to students majoring in education, are listed below.

1. ELEMENTARY LANGUAGE ARTS
Recommended for students who wish to concentrate on the general area of communications. This minor can be taken only in combination with the major in Elementary Education.

Required Units (crs.): 24 minimum

Required Courses: 18 units (crs.) from the following list of courses: Elementary Education 375, Reading Education 305, Communication 389, 447; Reading Education 420* OR 440**; Educational Leadership 486* OR 303**.

Electives: 6 units (crs.) from the following list of courses: Reading Education 410, 420; Art 348; English 219, 320, 224, 247, 301, 383; Educational Leadership 303, 358, 486; Communication 265, 465
*required for PK-3, PK-6 licensure students
**required for 1-6, 1-8 licensure students

NOTE:
  • Inclusion of Reading Education 410, 420 and 440 is in response to suggestions by Reading Education Department.
  • Minor courses that will double count against the major include Reading Education 305 and 420 or 440.
  • Minor courses that will double count against General Education 3 unit (cr.) literature requirement include English 219, 220 and 247.

2. ELEMENTARY SOCIAL SCIENCE
Recommended for students who desire a strong social science background for teaching in elementary schools. This minor can be taken only in combination with the Major in Elementary Education.

Required Units (crs.): 24 minimum

Requirements:
  • 3 units (crs.) in each of the following: Economics, Interdisciplinary Studies, Political Science, Sociology
  • 6 units (crs.) from the following list of courses: Geography 213, 313, 314, 317, 324.

Electives: 6 units (crs.) from the following list of courses: Economics 106, 206; History 101, 102, 201, 202, 341, 385, 386, 388; Political Science 302, 330; Religious Studies 265; Sociology 339; Social Work 220; Interdisciplinary Studies 135, 205, 315; Women’s Studies 225, 357; or any course in Anthropology, International Studies, Political Science, Sociology.

3. ELEMENTARY SCIENCE
Recommended for students who desire a strong natural science background for teaching in elementary schools. This minor can be taken only in combination with the major in Elementary Education.

Required Units (crs.): 22 minimum
In addition to the natural science courses required in their licensure program, students must select and complete a minimum of 22 units (crs.) from the following departments: Biology, Chemistry, Geography (Physical Geography courses only), Geology, and Physics/Astronomy. A minimum of three units (crs.) must be selected from each of the listed departments.

The following courses are suggested as being particularly appropriate for this minor. (Courses not listed may be chosen to meet the needs of individuals, with approval of the department chair.)
  • Biology: Biology 105, 106, 107, 230, 231
  • Chemistry: Chemistry 101, 102, 105, 106
  • Geography: Geography 121, 122, 335, 342
  • Geology: Geology 102, 150, 328
  • Physics/Astronomy: Physics/Astronomy 103, 104, 107, 108

4. READING
Recommended for students who wish to strengthen their background in reading. This minor is not approved for licensure at the undergraduate level. See Graduate Bulletin.

Required Units (crs.): 22 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Reading: Reading Education 305, 410, 435, 440, 453, 462

Other Requirements: 4 elective units (crs.) selected in consultation with Reading Advisor.

Special Prerequisites: Students must be in a Teacher Preparation Licensure Major Program.

5. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
Recommended for students who desire strong English as a Second Language background for teaching in elementary or secondary schools. This minor can be taken only in combination with the Major in Elementary Education, with licensure in 6-12 secondary education, with licensure in Foreign
Language Education. All other majors should see an Education Advisor regarding their eligibility for this minor. Four university semesters of a foreign language or verified fluency in foreign language are required as a prerequisite. See an Education Advisor for assistance.

Required Units (crs.): 25 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Curriculum and Instruction: Elementary/Secondary Education 346, 348, 351, 352, 353
  • English: English 384

Other Requirements:
  • 3 units (crs.) from the following list of courses: Communication 259, English 301, 341, 452; Spanish 307;.
  • 3 units (crs.) from the following list of courses: Anthropology 122, 232, 274, 312, 324; Communication 318, Spanish 334, 335; History 382; International Studies 321.
  • Noncredit cross-cultural experience.
  • Student teaching.

6. BILINGUAL EDUCATION HMONG
Recommended for students who are fluent who desire a strong background in Bilingual Education for teaching in elementary or secondary schools. This minor can be taken only in combination with the Major in Elementary Education, with licensure in 6-12 secondary education, with licensure in Foreign Language Education. All other majors should see an Education Advisor regarding their eligibility for this minor. Fluency in Hmong is a prerequisite for this minor. See an Education Advisor for assistance.

Required Units (crs.): 25 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Curriculum and Instruction: Elementary/ Secondary Education 346, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353
  • English: English 384
Other Requirements:
  • 3 units (crs.) from the following list of courses: English 301, 341, 452.
  • Noncredit cross-cultural experience Hmong.
  • Student teaching.

7. BILINGUAL EDUCATION SPANISH
Recommended for students who are fluent in Spanish and who desire a strong background in Bilingual Education for teaching in elementary or secondary schools. This minor can be taken only in combination with the Major in Elementary Education, with licensure in 6-12 secondary education, with licensure in Foreign Language Education. All other majors should see an Education Advisor regarding their eligibility for this minor. Fluency in Spanish is a prerequisite for this minor. See an Education Advisor for assistance.

Required Units (crs.): 27 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Curriculum and Instruction: Elementary/ Secondary Education 346, 348, 349, 351, 352
  • English: English 384

Other Requirements:
  • 6 units (crs.) from the following list of courses: English 301, 341, 452; Spanish 307.
  • 3 units (crs.) from the following list of courses: Anthropology 122, 232, 274, 324; Spanish 334, 335, History 382; International Studies 321; Communication 318.
  • Noncredit cross-cultural experience Spanish.
  • Student teaching.

8. LIBRARY SCIENCE
Recommended for students who wish to be licensed to work in a school library/media program. This minor can be taken only in combination with the major in Elementary Education or an academic major in Secondary Education. Completion of this minor and appropriate student teaching experience will license the student as Initial Instructional Library Media Specialist (901). This is a five year non-renewable license. Information on requirements for additional licensure may be obtained from the Department Chairperson.

Required Units (crs.): 24 minimum

Required Courses:
  • Library Science: Educational Leadership 302, 303, 308, 317, 321, 325, 329, 334
  • Curriculum and Instruction: Elementary Education 453 or Secondary Education 453

VIII. COURSE OFFERING

COUNSELOR EDUCATION

Counselor Education 201 1 unit (cr.)
Career Planning and Exploration
This seven-week course is recommended for all students who are undecided about an academic program and career choice. Through the process of self-exploration and career planning, they will learn how to match personal needs and expectations with satisfying career options. Students will learn how to assess themselves, research career alternatives, make decisions on factual information, and how to conduct an effective job-search campaign.

Counselor Education 480 3 units (crs.)
Introduction to Counseling
This course is designed to give an overview of counseling theories, helping skills, and the counseling profession to non-counselor education majors. It is designed to serve as an introduction/overview to the field of counseling. 480/680

EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS

Educational Foundations 235 3 units (crs.)
Child and Adolescent Development
Principles, theories, and methods of study of childhood and adolescence from prenatal development through graduation from high school Physical, motor, cognitive, emotional, social, and moral development are studied. Applications of knowledge to working with, nurturing, and helping children and adolescents learn in educational settings are emphasized. Prerequisite: 2.75 GPA.

Educational Foundations 310 2 units (crs.)
Measurement and Evaluation in Education
Role of measurement and evaluation in educational decision making. Characteristics of acceptable measurement and evaluation procedures. Principles underlying utilization of commonly used standardized tests. Elementary statistical techniques used in the interpretation of test results. Constructing and using teacher-made tests. Methods of reporting student progress. Prerequisite: Admission I, Educational Foundations 280 or equivalent.

Educational Foundations 343 3 units (crs.)
The Adult Learner
The biological, psychological, and social characteristics of the adult learner, including middle aged persons as well as those in later life. The intellectual abilities adults possess will be examined with specific references to educational processes. Prerequisite: Educational Foundations 235, 377 or equivalent. 343/543

Educational Foundations 350 3 units (crs.)
Adolescent Psychology
A study of pre-adolescence and adolescence as a psycho-socio-cultural phenomenon. Emphasis will be placed upon the basic conflicts and adjustment patterns of adolescents. Contemporary interests and problems of pre-adolescents and adolescents in school situations will be stressed. Prerequisite: Advanced standing including Psychology 201. 350/550

Educational Foundations 377 3 units (crs.)
Human Growth and Development
Study of theory and problems in the various areas of human development as interrelated phenomena. Psychological, social, emotional, intellectual, and physical development from infancy to maturity. Environmental factors will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Psychology 201.

Educational Foundations 380 3 units (crs.)
Educational Psychology
The psychological study of the principles, theories and recent research findings of teaching that affect classroom procedures. Included in the field of educational psychology are: theories and conditions of learning; theory and practice of motivation of students; classroom management, individual differences, basic assessment, and standardized testing. Emphasis in the broad concept of student diversity will be interwoven throughout the course. This course will build upon the fundamental understanding of cognitive, social/emotional, and moral development from Educational Foundations 235. Prerequisite: Educational Foundations 235 or equivalent and Admission I for Education Majors.

Educational Foundations 389 3 units (crs.)
Education of Gifted and Talented Students
Issues in identifying, motivating, and providing for the learning of gifted and talented children and youth. Attention is given to creative processes taught on individual and group bases. 389/589

Educational Foundations 407 3 units (crs.)
Education and Diverse Populations
This course deals with the educational needs of members of diverse populations (African-Americans, American Indians, Hispanic-Americans, Asian-Americans, disabled individuals, lower socio-economic and/or female persons) and related concerns they may face in the traditional educational settings. 407/607

Educational Foundations 412 3 units (crs.)
Teaching as a Profession: Legal and Ethical Aspects
This course will introduce aspiring teachers to various aspects of the profession, including what a profession is and how it may be differentiated from other occupations. The structure and various roles of school systems will be explored. Significant ethical and legal issues regarding teachers and students will be examined through case studies and analyses.

Educational Foundations 435 2-3 units (crs.)
Human Development and Education
Consideration of major theories, principles, problems, issues, and recent research findings on human development. Physical, intellectual, social, and personality development throughout the lifespan will be examined in the context of education. One emphasis will be on students' reflections of their own development and their observations of the development of others. A second emphasis, related to the first, is how these reflections and observations may contribute to the development of children and adolescents under their care as whole persons. Students may enroll for 2 or 3 credits at either the undergraduate or graduate level. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree or consent of instructor. 435/635

Educational Foundations 471 2-3 units (crs.)
Learning Processes in Children
Reading and discussing a variety of new materials in the areas of early childhood learning and generating applications of research findings to working with children. Some areas discussed: learning in the newborn, learning to love and to fear, play, attitude conditioning, motivation for learning, self-concept development, Piaget, Montessori, cognitive growth, IQ change, approaches to teaching young children. Prerequisite: Educational Foundations 235 or equivalent. 471/671

Educational Foundations 496 1-3 units (crs.)
Independent Study
Supervised research or independent study in Educational Psychology. The outline of the student's proposal must be approved prior to registration. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and department chairperson.

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

Educational Leadership 199 1 unit (cr.)
Practicum in Individual Instruction
Designed to provide individual teaching experience for students at all levels. Registration is limited to one of these courses in any one term and is not available during the first term of the freshman year and during the professional term. Prerequisite: Registration of Elementary Education and Special Education majors requires approval of the respective department chairperson and registration of Secondary Education students requires the approval of the chairperson of both the Curriculum and Instruction Department and the academic department involved (normally the student's major department). Registration of students outside the College of Education and Human Services requires the approval of the chairperson of the Human Services and Professional Leadership Department. Pass/Fail course.

Educational Leadership 205 1 unit (cr.)
Introduction to Microcomputers in Education
An introduction to the use of the microcomputer as a tool of instruction. A variety of microcomputers and instructional packages will be examined and used in class activities. The course includes a brief introduction to the computer languages BASIC, PILOT, and LOGO. The major emphasis is on computer awareness and developing student confidence in using a microcomputer as a learning/ teaching aid.

Educational Leadership 299 1 unit (cr.)
Practicum in Individual Instruction
Designed to provide individual teaching experience for students at all levels. Registration is limited to one of these courses in any one term and is not available during the first term of the freshman year and during the professional term. Prerequisite: Registration of Elementary Education and Special Education majors requires approval of the respective department chairperson and registration of Secondary Education students requires the approval of the chairperson of both the Curriculum and Instruction Department and the academic department involved (normally the student's major department). Registration of students outside the College of Education and Human Services requires the approval of the chairperson of the Human Services and Professional Leadership Department. Pass/Fail course.

Educational Leadership 302 3 units (crs.)
Literature for Children
Literature for children aged three to twelve. Emphasis on: criteria for evaluation and aids for selection of materials; the reading interests, needs, and abilities of children; and reading, listening and viewing guidance in the classroom and in school and public libraries. Prerequisite: Admission I required for PEP students. 302/502

Educational Leadership 303 3 units (crs.)
Literature for Young Adults
Criteria for evaluation and aids for selection of materials or young people aged thirteen to eighteen as well as extensive reading of the literature. Reading, listening and viewing guidance techniques appropriate for the classroom and for the school and public library. 303/503

Educational Leadership 304 3 units (crs.)
Methods of Bibliographic Instruction
Preparing the librarian to teach students the use of books and libraries through the study of the aims, organization and methods of library instruction. Concurrent enrollment: Secondary Education 372. 304/504

Educational Leadership 308 3 units (crs.)
Multimedia Design and Production I
A direct experience in the development and production of media materials. Focus will be on students' needs and objectives related to their professional fields such as education, library, business, or health. Special fee: $10.00. 308/508

Educational Leadership 317 3 units (crs.)
Classification and Cataloging
Theory and principles of library classification and cataloging. Practical problems in classifying by the Dewey Decimal system; main entry of personal authors, practice in constructing unit cards. 317/517

Educational Leadership 321 3 units (crs.)
Building Library Collections
Principles of developing and managing collections; investigation of selection aids and reviewing tools with emphasis on national and trade bibliography; acquisition procedures; and the current state of the book trade.

Educational Leadership 325 3 units (crs.)
Instructional Technology
A basic course in the selection and utilization of media and computers in the teaching-learning process. Media technology is studied as a means of enhancing and improving learning. Prerequisite: Admission I for PEP students. 325/525

Educational Leadership 329 3 units (crs.)
General Reference
Study of basic titles in a general reference collection. Organization by type of material: encyclopedias, dictionaries, yearbooks, indexes. Theory, current trends, and future prospects of reference services. 329/529

Educational Leadership 334 3 units (crs.)
Administration of the School Media Center
Techniques of administering the multi-media instructional materials center in elementary and secondary schools. Problems in planning quarters, equipment, personnel, budgets, services, investigation of current standards. Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 317/517 and 321/521. 334/534

Educational Leadership 358 3 units (crs.)
Multicultural Education Materials for Children and Adolescents
This course will introduce students to a variety of Multicultural books, non-print media and electronic databases for children and adolescents. It will prepare them to incorporate these materials into the curriculum of the K-12 classroom and into activities of the school media center. 358/558

Educational Leadership 375 1-3 units (crs.)
Current Issues in Technology/Media
A series of discussions on current trends, issues, problems, and services in librarianship followed by class discussion. Theme will vary frequently. Course may be taken three times provided the subject of the course is not repeated. Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 317, 321 and 329. 375/575

Educational Leadership 399 1 unit (cr.)
Practicum in Individual Instruction
Designed to provide individual teaching experience for students at all levels. Registration is limited to one of these courses in any one term and is not available during the first term of the freshman year and during the professional term. Prerequisite: Registration of Elementary Education and Special Education majors requires approval of the respective department chairperson. Registration of Secondary Education students requires the approval of both the chairperson of the Curriculum and Instruction Department and the chairperson of the academic department involved (normally the student's major department). Registration of students outside the College of Education and Human Services requires the approval of the chairperson of the Human Services and Professional Leadership Department. Pass/Fail course.

Educational Leadership 409 3 units (crs.)
Classroom Microcomputer Applications
Survey of contemporary instructional microcomputer applications, providing hands-on experiences with those applications most commonly used by classroom teachers. Students develop operational proficiency with drill and practice, tutorial, simulation, and word processing programs, and learn how to appropriately integrate each of these courseware types into classroom practice. No previous experience with computers is required. 409/609

Educational Leadership 420 3 units (crs.)
The Internet as an Instructional Tool
Integration of the Internet into classrooms to promote student learning is the focus of this course. Topics covered will include: electronic communication, the Internet, search engines and online searching, information literacy, legal and ethical issues, hardware and software requirements, web page design and evaluation, and development and delivery of instructional units which incorporate the Internet. Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 325/525 Instructional Technology, another technology class or consent of instructor. 420/620

Educational Leadership 441 1-3 units (crs.)
Instructional Strategies
The course focuses upon such instructional strategies as developing appropriate objectives, developing creative thinking, exercises in deductive and inductive thinking, methods of effective questioning, and techniques for clarifying values. The course is an introduction into the self-directed learning environment. 441/641

Educational Leadership 451 1-3 units (crs.)
Field Tour of Libraries
Field tours to famous libraries to enable students to explore history, organization, services, and specialties of famous libraries in the U.S. or abroad. Each time the course is offered, it will involve libraries of a specific geographic area. (Offered in an interim when there is sufficient demand.) 451/651

Educational Leadership 474 1-6 units (crs.)
Honors: Thesis
Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be "Honors Thesis." Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Prerequisite: University Honors program and junior standing. Maximum of 6 units (crs.).

Educational Leadership 486 3 units (crs.)
Library Story Hour
Storytelling and survey of literary sources with emphasis on folk literature. Principles of selection, methods of adaptation, techniques of presentation, and planning story hour programs. Prerequisite: Educational Leadership 302. 486/686

Educational Leadership 496 1-3 units (crs.)
Independent Study
An individual will conduct independent study to meet specific instructional needs not provided by current course requirements or offerings. Prerequisite: The outline of the student's proposal must be approved prior to registration.

Educational Leadership 499 1 unit (cr.)
Practicum in Individual Instruction
Designed to provide individual teaching experience for students at all levels. Registration is limited to one of these courses in any one term and is not available during the first term of the freshman year and during the professional term. Prerequisite: Registration of Elementary Education and Special Education majors requires approval of the respective department chairperson and registration of Secondary Education students requires the approval of the chairperson of the Curriculum and Instruction Department and the academic department involved (normally the student's major department). Registration of students outside the College of Education and Human Services requires the approval of the chairperson of the Human Services and Professional Leadership Department. Pass/Fail course.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Elementary Education 201 3 units (crs.)
Individual, School, and Society
This is an introductory course in education. Its purpose is to expand your understanding of schooling through an analysis of its many connections with the individual and society. This, in part, will be accomplished through a study of social, political, and economic forces in U.S. Society that have a direct bearing on schooling. Prerequisite: 2.75 GPA.

Elementary Education 311 3 units (crs.)
Teaching Languages Arts Pre-K-8
This course is planned for you to study teaching language arts, to provide practice using instructional materials, and to learn about evaluation strategies likely to enhance communication of all learners. An integrated and constructivist approach to reading, writing, speaking, listening, language study and language diversity will be provided. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 201, Educational Foundations 380 (may be taken concurrently) and Admission I.

Elementary Education 312 3 units (crs.)
Education in the Early Years
Designed to give prospective teachers of young children a basic knowledge of Early Childhood Education, particularly emphasizing the curriculum and guidance of a school child's growth, development, and learning as it applies to daily experiences. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 201, Educational Foundations 380 (may be taken concurrently) and Admission I.

Elementary Education 313 3 units (crs.)
Preschool and Kindergarten Curriculum and Techniques
The needs and interests of children of nursery and kindergarten ages; the content of an activity program for the preschool and kindergarten. Emphasis on children's social, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs with suggestions of interest areas and activities which lead into the subjects included in the curriculum for the primary grades. Laboratory experiences are required. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 201, Educational Foundations 380 (may be taken concurrently) and Admission I.

Elementary Education 314 3 units (crs.)
Organization and Administration of Preschool Programs in Early Childhood Education
Different organizational plans of nursery schools, Head Starts, day care, and other preschool programs. This includes staffing, housing, admissions, nutrition and health policies, school records, budgeting, community resources, family/community/agency involvement and relationships, and school/community relations with particular emphasis on State of Wisconsin accreditation and licensing requirements. Prerequisite: Admission I and Elementary Education 312. 314/514

Elementary Education 316 3 units (crs.)
Teaching Science and Environmental Education in the Elementary/Middle School
Provides the student with the knowledge of currently accepted goals of science and environmental education in the elementary/middle school. The examination, evaluation, and practice of techniques compatible with these goals are emphasized, and contemporary elementary/middle school curricula are examined and evaluated. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 201, Educational Foundations 380 (may be taken concurrently) and Admission I. Special fee: $30.00

Elementary Education 317 3 units (crs.)
Teaching Social Studies Pre K - 8
This course is designed to study social studies teaching, to practice using instructional materials and to learn about evaluation strategies likely to enhance social studies knowledge construction and learning by early childhood, elementary and middle school pupils. It is also planned for students to study educational research and practice related to early childhood, elementary and middle level curriculum development in social studies. Emphasis is given to correlation with other school subjects. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 201, Educational Foundations 380 (may be taken concurrently) and Admission I.

Elementary Education 318 2 units (crs.)
Assessment in Early Childhood
This course is designed to address the theoretical and practical issues, practices, and techniques that would guide practitioners toward the meaningful assessment of preschool children. The course includes preschool cognitive assessment, family assessment, preschool screening, and intervention design. Prerequisite: Educational Foundations 380.

Elementary Education 330 1 unit (cr.)
Teaching Foreign Languages in the Elementary School
Study and practice of basic theory, approaches, and materials of teaching and learning a foreign language with special emphasis on the elementary school child and program. Prerequisite: Admission I.

Elementary Education 346 3 units (crs.)
Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language
In this course we will review developments in second language theory and practice; explore ways to teach, and integrate, the skills or reading, writing, listening and speaking, both within ESL classes and in content-area instruction; survey a variety of approaches to ESL methods; discuss ways to focus on culture in language teaching, to create community among second language learners and to build bridges between schools and diverse linguistic and cultural communities; and address the needs of second language learner assessment and classroom management. Prerequisite: Fluency check. 346/546

Elementary Education 348 3 units (crs.)
Principles of Bilingual/Bicultural Education
In this course we will explore historical and political dimensions of bilingual/bicultural education, often from comparative perspectives; examine theoretical assumptions and recent research findings about learning through first and second languages; and discuss practical implications of critical theory and research for those who work with bilingual/bicultural children, adolescents, families and communities. Prerequisite: Fluency check. 348/548

Elementary Education 349 3 units (crs.)
Content Area Instruction Bilingual Education
In this course we will explore the theories, practices, and possibilities for bilingual education across content areas. We will examine the teaching of content area subjects to bilingual children and adolescents in both bilingual (first language) classrooms as well as mainstream classrooms. Students will thus have the chance to prepare for content area teaching in English as well as Hmong or Spanish. Prerequisite: Fluency check. 349/549

Elementary Education 351 3 units (crs.)
Authentic Assessment for ESL/Bilingual Education
A seminar course relating to specific topics in the assessment of English language learners. The course will focus on developments in authentic placement, diagnostic and achievement language assessment, and the use of portfolio and performance assessment with English language learners. Various assessment tools (English and Spanish) will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Fluency check. 351/551

Elementary Education 352 3 units (crs.)
ESL and Multicultural Materials, Elementary/Secondary;
In this course we will review developments in second language theory and practice; explore ways to develop curriculum, and integrate the academic skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in content-area instruction; survey, and critically analyze, a variety of ESL and multicultural materials for elementary and secondary instruction; discuss ways to focus on culture in the curriculum and address ways to connect curriculum to second language learner assessment and instruction. Prerequisite: Fluencey check. 352/552

Elementary Education 353 4 units (crs.)
Hmong Language, Culture & Learning
Designed to familiarize educators and others with the language, culture and educational issues relevant to Hmong people in Wisconsin and the United States. Areas of exploration will include the nature of Hmong language, Hmong history, the traditional family and clan structure, child-rearing mores, healing practices, marriage and funeral practices, and educational beliefs and practices. Contemporary developments and adjustment issues within the Hmong communitites will be discussed, especially school achievements and challenges, intergenerational conflicts, youth gangs, and the need to provide high expectations and supportive educational environments for Hmong children, youth and families. Cross-listed: Elementary Education/Secondary Education 353. 353/553

Elementary Education 360 3 units (crs.)
Clinical Experience in Teaching
Direct pre-student teaching experiences in elementary classroom with seminar for integration of teaching-learning theory. Admission to Student Teaching requires a "Pass" in this course. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 201 (except for Special Education majors), Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission II. Concurrent enrollment in at least one Elementary Education methods course. Pass/Fail course.

Elementary Education 375 3 units (crs.)
Teaching Writing PK-8
A process approach to writing will be utilized to help students learn to teach writing PK-8. This will be a multi-genre course including instruction in expository and narrative writing. Multicultural and gendered dimensions of writing will be explored and writing across the curriculum as an instructional model will be examined. Students will reflect on the improving their own writing as they learn to teach writing to others. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 311 and Admission I.

Elementary Education 384 3 units (crs.)
Teaching Mathematics Pre K - 8 Mathematics
The course is designed to study teaching, to practice using instructional materials and to learn about evaluation strategies likely to enhance mathematical knowledge construction and learning by early childhood, elementary and middle school pupils. It is also planned for students to study educational research and practice related to early childhood, elementary and middle level curriculum development in mathematics. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 201, Educational Foundations 380 (may be taken concurrently), Admission I, Mathematics 110, 211 and 217.

Elementary Education 400 5 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Elementary Education
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experiences for student teachers and interns in grades 1-6 under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education 401 5 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Elementary Education
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experiences for student teachers and interns in grades 1-6 under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education 405 2 units (crs.)
Preschool, Elementary School and Middle School Student Teaching Seminar
Students will integrate teaching-learning theories as they apply to problems which occur in the classroom situations in which the student teacher or intern is working. Prerequisite: Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Elementary Education 400 and 401.

Elementary Education 424 3 units (crs.)
Student Teaching Pre-Kindergarten
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experiences in pre-kindergarten classes under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education 425 3 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Kindergarten
Observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences in kindergarten under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education 452 3 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Elementary Education PK-3/1-6/1-8
A student teaching experience for students wishing additional experiences related to teaching. Prerequisite: Admission II and 10 units (crs.) of student teaching.

Elementary Education 453 5 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Middle/Junior High School
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experiences in middle/junior high school under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education 454 4 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Elementary Education
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experiences in grade 1 through grade 6 under supervision. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education 455 1 unit (cr.)
Preschool, Elementary School and Middle School Student Teaching Seminar
Students learn to apply principles of education to problems of discipline, selection of goals, and media for learning, guiding learning experiences and evaluation of outcomes, as these problems occur in the practical classroom situations in which the student teacher is working. This course must be taken in conjunction with student teaching. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Elementary Education 496 1-3 units (crs.)
Independent Study
An independent study in Early Childhood/Elementary/Middle Level Education for students who would pursue in depth a basic idea in early childhood, elementary and middle level education. Prerequisite: Outline of proposed study presented to elementary faculty member, the student's advisor, the Department Chairperson, and the Associate Dean. (See Department Chairperson first.)

HUMAN SERVICES

Human Services 111 3 units (crs.)
Becoming a Person: Exploring the Self
A study of the individual in the environment, applying methods of psychology to understanding information provided by a review of the self. A description of various psychological models of personality, human learning, communications, and coping is followed by application of the various models to data from participants. Not for credit in the major or minor.

Human Services 203 3 units (crs.)
Introduction to Human Services
A survey course introducing the roles, functions, history, and future of human service workers from a generic skills perspective. Provides opportunities for career exploration by initial field placement in the human services field. Prerequisite: Human Services major.

Human Services 310 3 units (crs.)
Interpersonal Relations in the Helping Professions
Basic human services skills, including listening and interviewing, decision making and problem-solving strategies will be presented, discussed, demonstrated and practiced. Prerequisite: Human Services major or Physical Education major. Human Service majors; completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 203.

Human Services 315 3 units (crs.)
Value Development in Human Services
This course introduces the principles of value development and how those principles contribute to a human service worker's ability to provide services to clients. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 203.

Human Services 320 3 units (crs.)
Human Behavior and the Human Services
This course considers human behavior and interaction from a cognitive, behavioral, and humanistic perspective. This material is then applied to understanding self, others, special populations, and issues in human behavior. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 203.

Human Services 325 3 units (crs.)
Intermediate Field Experience in Human Services
Supervised experiences focusing upon human relations skills in human services. The student has the appropriate environment to observe, participate, and integrate accepted practice in human services. Prerequisite: Human Services 203, Human Services 310, a third Human Services course for a total of 9 units, consent of instructor, and Admission I.

Human Services 340 3 units (crs.)
Social Issues and Human Services
A course designed to familiarize students with the social issues in which human service skills are applied. It is to facilitate an understanding of social issues and their relationship to human services. The course considers the theoretical context for looking at social issues and social action in human services. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 325.

Human Services 345 3 units (crs.)
Treatment Modalities for Substance Abuse
An examination of self-help treatment programs such as AA and Al-Anon, in patient and out patient treatment programs normally provided by general hospitals and mental health institutes, and aftercare treatment such as mental health agencies, half-way houses, social agencies, and religious groups.

Human Services 350 3 units (crs.)
Task Group Strategies in Human Services
A study of the knowledge and skills involved in working with task groups within the human services. Specific strategies will be emphasized through experiential learning in the areas of observation, communication, and problem solving. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 325.

Human Services 353 3 units (crs.)
Domestic Violence
The course will familiarize students with the problem of domestic violence. Special emphasis will be given to spouse abuse, the cycle of violence, alternatives available to the victim, legal options, and counseling approaches used. Aspects of prevention, community intervention will be explored, along with the historical perspective and contributory factors such as sex-role stereotypes, social violence, and cultural norms. Cross-listed: Human Services 353/ Women's Studies 353. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses.

Human Services 360 3 units (crs.)
Program Planning and Evaluation
The knowledge and skills involved in planning, management, and evaluation of programs in the human services. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 325.

Human Services 377 1-3 units (crs.)
Community Development in Human Services Groups
Studies the knowledge and develops the skills involved in group processes of community development. Special emphasis is placed upon the areas of communication, trust, commitment, leadership, community organization and governance.

Human Services 386 1-3 units (crs.)
Psychology of Drug Use and Abuse
Surveys the psychological, sociological, medical, and legal facets of the drug use and abuse problem as it affects our society today. Emphasizes societal pressures which contribute to the problem, personality characteristics of drug abusers, the drugs most commonly abused, and research upon those drugs. Examines the orthodox and unorthodox treatment and rehabilitation programs which are presently operating. Prerequisite: 6 units (crs.) of Psychology to include Psychology 201 or 204. 386/586

Human Services 410 3 units (crs.)
Laboratory in Human Services Strategies
Simulations, laboratory exercises, and experiential learning techniques are used to present problem identification, conflict resolution, change agent, and consultation strategies for application to human services settings. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 325.

Human Services 411 3 units (crs.)
Laboratory in Human Services Program Planning
Simulations, laboratory exercises and experiential learning techniques are used to develop program planning and program management skills in human services settings. Prerequisite: Human Services 320, 340 and 360.

Human Services 415 3 units (crs.)
Legal and Ethical Aspects of Human Services
An introductory course providing an overview of the legal aspects in the field of human services and implications for the human services worker. Included are such topics as liability, confidentiality and privilege, records and rights of clients, due process and equal protection in terms of staff and clients, discrimination, and witnessing. A unit on ethics will also be included. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 325, Social Work 167, Criminal Justice 103 or consent of instructor.

Human Services 420 3 units (crs.)
Field Experiences in Human Services
Supervised experiences which enable the student to observe, participate, and integrate accepted practice in the field of human services. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 410 and Admission II.
Human Services 421 3 units (crs.)
Field Experiences in Human Services
Supervised experiences which enable the student to observe, participate, and integrate accepted practice in the field of human services. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 410 and Admission II.

Human Services 422 1 unit (cr.)
Seminar in Human Services
This course is a seminar in which the student analyzes, integrates and evaluates his/her field experience. Discussion, readings and individual presentations are in the instructional methods. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Human Services 410 and Admission II.

Human Services 496 1-3 units (crs.)
Independent Study
An independent study in the Human Services Program for students who would pursue in depth an idea, process, or belief related to human services. Prerequisite: The outline of the student's proposal must be approved prior to registration.

READING EDUCATION

Reading Education 305 3 units (crs.)
Reading Methods and Strategies
Analyses of trends in reading will be made. Study of basic skills in teaching reading, methods of identifying problems and evaluating progress, and methods of improving reading instruction in the classroom. Prerequisite: Admission I.

Reading Education 410 3 units (crs.)
Assessing and Planning for Literacy Instruction
Provides pre-service teachers a contextually-set opportunity to employ assessment and instructional strategies. Decoding strategies that include phonics are covered along with strategies for the development of fluency and comprehension. Other literacy related aspects such as spelling and writing are included along with the importance of motivating children to read. A supervised field experience is arranged. Prerequisite: Reading Education 305. 410/610

Reading Education 412 3 units (crs.)
Holistic School Reading Programs: Issues and Implications
Provides students with an opportunity to explore in depth issues and ideas related to school reading programs influenced by holistic theories and beliefs. 412/612

Reading Education 420 3 units (crs.)
Literacy and Language Development in Young Children
Prepares teachers of young children to understand language acquisition and emergent literacy. Focus is on developmentally appropriate practice in reading and writing including the use of sound-symbol relationships (phonics). The importance of the home-school partnership is also emphasized. Prerequisite: Reading Education 305 or Elementary Education 311. 420/620 (Fall)

Reading Education 435 3 units (crs.)
Secondary Reading Methods and Programs
Historical perspectives, basic instructional techniques, approaches to problems in one's own instructional area, roles in and designs for a total school program, what research and authorities suggest, and consideration of contemporary issues and concerns. Prerequisite: Admission I. 435/635

Reading Education 440 3 units (crs.)
Reading and Language Arts in the Content Areas
Provides practical guidelines for those who are or will be elementary, middle school, or secondary content area teachers to assist them in using reading, writing, speaking, and listening as complementary learning processes for their content area. Students of this course bring their expertise of the subject to be taught (such as English, social studies, science, mathematics, music, art), and the course assists students in dealing with the language component of that content area. Students will be given experience in producing study, pattern, and concept guides, techniques for effectively presenting vocabulary, and for using reading, writing, speaking, and listening to facilitate learning in content areas. Prerequisite: Admission I. 440/640

Reading Education 453 3 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Reading
Supervised observation, participation, and responsible teaching experiences in reading. Prerequisite: Should be taken after or concurrently with regular student teaching. (Fall)

Reading Education 462 3 units (crs.)
Managing a School Reading Program
The organization and management of effective reading in classrooms and schools. Procedures for planning, facilitating, and maintaining a reading program. Prerequisite: Reading Education 305 and 435. (Spring)

Reading Education 470 1-3 units (crs.)
Current Topics in Reading
Specific concerns related to the teaching of reading are considered. Each offering emphasizes a theme which focuses on current topics in reading, related research, and practice. The course may be retaken provided the subject of the course is not repeated. Prerequisite: Minimum of 6 units (crs.) in Reading.

Reading Education 496 1-3 units (crs.)
Independent Study
An individual conducting an independent study in reading pursues an area or topic related to reading not provided by course requirements or offerings. Prerequisite: Approved outline of student's proposal prior to registration.

SECONDARY EDUCATION

Secondary Education 201 3 units (crs.)
Individual, School, and Society
This is an introductory course in education. Its purpose is to expand your understanding of schooling through an analysis of its many connections with the individual and society. This, in part, will be accomplished through a study of social, political, and economic forces in U.S. Society that have a direct bearing on schooling. Prerequisite: 2.75 GPA.

Secondary Education 335 3 units (crs.)
Teaching of English
By readings, demonstrations, and practical experiences, the student learns to organize the materials and methods of the English curriculum into effective teaching procedures in the secondary classroom. Majors in English take concurrently with Clinical Experience. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission I. (Fall)

Secondary Education 336 3 units (crs.)
Teaching of English II
This course will better prepare students for 6-12 teaching of English/Language Arts. The course will provide learning opportunities for 6-12 English context for school-to-work, technology applications, multicultural and gender equity curriculum issues, methodology and models, lesson planning and presentation skills, and integrating all areas of Language Arts into classrooms. The course will represent a strong affirmation of the standards of professional organizations such as National Council of Teachers of English and National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, and an effort to ensure preparation of teachers as skillful, caring intellectuals. Prerequisite: Admissions I and Secondary Education 335. (Spring)

Secondary Education 337 3 units (crs.)
Teaching of History and Social Studies
The differing points of view in the teaching of history and the social sciences and of the goals which parallel these differing points of view are examined. Consideration is given to selecting appropriate teaching methods and materials necessary to achieve the varied objectives of the social studies. Learning process is examined as it applies to the attainment of the objectives. Majors in History or other Social Sciences take concurrently with Clinical Experience. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission I.

Secondary Education 338 3 units (crs.)
Teaching of Social Studies II
This course will strengthen the teaching of secondary social studies. Topics include standards for content, curriculum, and assessment, as central to preparing skillful practitioners who are caring intellectuals. This course emphasizes constructing a social studies curriculum focusing on central ideas, content and depth. This course will enable students to conceptualize a "thinking" social studies curriculum. Classroom management and conflict resolution, use of computer-based technology, multicultural and global perspectives, integration of cross disciplinary ideas and content, and school to work as it relates to social studies education will be addressed. Prerequisite: Admission I and Secondary Education 337.

Secondary Education 339 3 units (crs.)
Teaching of Science
The student should be able to construct lesson plans which are usable, distinguish between methods of teaching which are effective and ineffective, and demonstrate ability to perform in the capacity of a science teacher making acceptable use of the classroom and the laboratory. Should be able to name the most recent curricular developments in all the areas of science and demonstrate a thorough understanding of their underlying philosophies and their implications for instructional procedures. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission I. (Fall)

Secondary Education 340 3 units (crs.)
Teaching of Science II
This course will provide the student with the opportunity to continue developing the pedagogical content knowledge necessary to teach science. The context for this will be the state and national standards, multicultural and gender equity issues, technology use in the classroom, and assessment. Majors in science take concurrently with Clinical Experience. Prerequisite: Admission I and Secondary Education 339.

Secondary Education 341 3 units (crs.)
Teaching of Mathematics
The objectives, curriculum, and teaching methods related to the courses in secondary school mathematics with emphasis upon trends, changes and investigations in the curriculum, and in teaching procedures. Majors in Mathematics take concurrently with Clinical Experience. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission I. (Fall)

Secondary Education 342 3 units (crs.)
Teaching of Mathematics II
This course will provide 6-12 mathematics education students with the content and skills required to teach mathematics as envisioned by mathematics education organizations. Topics include secondary mathematics education in relation to technology management, conflict resolution, motivation, gender issues, equity issues, mathphobia, multicultural mathematics, school to work issues, and mathematics education theory. This course will result in a more skillful teacher who will be better able to actualize the vision of what it means to empower students with mathematics and be a caring intellectual. Prerequisite: Admission I and Secondary Education 341. (Spring)

Secondary Education 346 3 units (crs.)
Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language
In this course we will review developments in second language theory and practice; explore ways to teach, and integrate, the skills or reading, writing, listening and speaking, both within ESL classes and in content-area instruction; survey a variety of approaches to ESL methods; discuss ways to focus on culture in language teaching, to create community among second language learners and to build bridges between schools and diverse linguistic and cultural communities; and address the needs of second language learner assessment and classroom management. Prerequisite: Fluency check. 346/546

Secondary Education 347 3 units (crs.)
The Teaching of Foreign Languages
The study of a modified audio-lingual approach emphasizing the teaching of basic skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing a modern foreign language. The intended outcome of the course is a familiarity with concepts of what language is and with language learning aims, theory and strategies. Majors in Foreign Languages take concurrently with Clinical Experience. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235, 380 and Admission I.

Secondary Education 348 3 units (crs.)
Principles of Billingual/Bicultural Education
In this course we will explore historical and political dimensions of bilingual/bicultural education, often from comparative perspectives; examine theoretical assumptions and recent research findings about learning through first and second languages; and discuss practical implications of critical theory and research for those who work with bilingual/bicultural children, adolescents, families and communities. Prerequisite: Fluency check. 348/548

Secondary Education 349 3 units (crs.)
Content Area Instruction Bilingual Education
In this course we will explore the theories, practices, and possibilities for bilingual education across content areas. We will examine the teaching of content area subjects to bilingual children and adolescents in both bilingual (first language) classrooms as well as mainstream classrooms. Students will thus have the chance to prepare for content area teaching in English as well as Hmong or Spanish. Prerequisite: Fluency check. 349/549

Secondary Education 351 3 units (crs.)
Authentic Assessment for ESL/Bilingual Education
A seminar course relating to specific topics in the assessment of English language learners. The course will focus on developments in authentic placement, diagnostic and achievement language assessment, and the use of portfolio and performance assessment with English language learners. Various assessment tools (English and Spanish) will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Fluency check. 351/551

Secondary Education 352 3 units (crs.)
ESL and Multicultural Materials, Elementary/Secondary;
In this course we will review developments in second language theory and practice; explore ways to develop curriculum, and integrate the academic skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in content-area instruction; survey, and critically analyze, a variety of ESL and multicultural materials for elementary and secondary instruction; discuss ways to focus on culture in the curriculum and address ways to connect curriculum to second language learner assessment and instruction. Prerequisite: Fluencey check. 352/552

Secondary Education 353 4 units (crs.)
Hmong Language, Culture & Learning
Designed to familiarize educators and others with the language, culture and educational issues relevant to Hmong people in Wisconsin and the United States. Areas of exploration will include the nature of Hmong language, Hmong history, the traditional family and clan structure, child-rearing mores, healing practices, marriage and funeral practices, and educational beliefs and practices. Contemporary developments and adjustment issues within the Hmong communitites will be discussed, especially school achievements and challenges, intergenerational conflicts, youth gangs, and the need to provide high expectations and supportive educational environments for Hmong children, youth and families. Cross-listed: Elementary Education/Secondary Education 353. 353/553

Secondary Education 356 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching English (6-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Concurrent enrollment in Secondary Education 335. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course.

Secondary Education 357 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching History and Social Studies (6-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Concurrent enrollment in Secondary Education 337. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course.

Secondary Education 358 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching Science (6-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Concurrent enrollment in Secondary Education 340. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course. (Spring)

Secondary Education 359 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching Mathematics (6-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of ‘pass’ in this course. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Concurrent enrollment in Secondary Education 341. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course.

Secondary Education 361 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching Foreign Language (6-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Concurrent enrollment: Secondary Education 347. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course.

Secondary Education 362 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching Speech (6-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "'pass" in this course and in Secondary Education 355. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course.

Secondary Education 366 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching Art (K-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of " pass" in this course. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course.

Secondary Education 367 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching Music (K-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course.

Secondary Education 370 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching Physical Education (K-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380 and Physical Education 392 (may be taken concurrently). Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course.

Secondary Education 371 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of "pass" in this course. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Concurrent enrollment in Secondary Education 347 and Elementary Education 330. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course. (Spring)

Secondary Education 372 3 units (crs.)
Clinical in Teaching Library Science (K-12)
Under the guidance of an experienced teacher, clinical students are directed to study individual cases and problems, the diagnosis and solution of which involve the application of teaching-learning principles and the relationship of theory and practice. Contact with small groups in scaled down teaching situations. Taken concurrently with the respective (major) methods course. Admission to student teaching requires a grade of ‘pass’ in this course. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 201, Educational Foundations 235 and 380. Open only to College of Education and Human Services students. Pass/Fail course.

Secondary Education 402 2 units (crs.)
6-12/K-12 Student Teaching Seminar
Provides the opportunity to earn one additional unit (cr.) by pursuing independent study modules designed by the student and the university supervisor. Corequisite: This course or Secondary Education 455 or 465 must be taken in conjunction with Secondary Education 450, 451, 460, or 461. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education 450 5 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Middle Education
For students seeking secondary licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education 451 5 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in High School
For students seeking secondary licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education 453 3 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Secondary Education 6-12, PK-12
A student teaching experience for students wishing additional experiences related to teaching. Prerequisite: Admission II and 10 units (crs.) of student teaching.

Secondary Education 455 1 unit (cr.)
Student Teaching Seminar
Designed to aid the student to integrate teaching-learning theories as applied to problems which occur in the classroom situation. Corequisite: Secondary Education 450 or Secondary Education 451. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education 460 5 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Elementary and Secondary Education
For students seeking K-12 licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education 461 5 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Elementary and Secondary Education
For students seeking K-12 licensure. Supervised observation, participation and responsible teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education 465 1 unit (cr.)
PK-12 Student Teaching Seminar
Designed to aid the student to integrate teaching-learning theories as applied to problems which occur in the classroom situation. Corequisite: Secondary Education 460 or Secondary Education 461 for K-12 licensure. Prerequisite: Admission II.

Secondary Education 496 1-3 units (crs.)
Independent Study
An independent study in Secondary Education for students who would pursue in depth an idea, process, or belief related to secondary instruction. This course can be taken by upper division students. Prerequisite: Outline of proposed study presented to a secondary faculty member, the student's advisor, the Department Chairperson, and the Associate Dean. (See Department Chairperson first.)

SERVICE COURSES IN EDUCATION

Service Courses in Education 097 1 unit (cr.)
Remediation of Mathematics Deficits for Dyslexic Students
This course will use various hands-on manipulatives to teach students admitted to the Project Success summer transition program the basic mathematic concepts necessary to master the basic algebra mathematic workload in college level courses. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of algebra concepts in the following areas: integers, rational numbers, solving equations, polynomials, and radical expressions. This course does not count toward the 128 units (crs.) necessary for graduation.

Service Courses in Education 098 1 unit (cr.)
Remediation of Written Expression Deficits for Dyslexic Students
This course offers direct instruction to remediate the writing skills deficits of dyslexic students enrolled in the Project Success summer transition program. The course will provide the participant with a variety of methods and applications aimed at increasing the participants' knowledge and skill with the intent that participants will apply these skills to passing English 101. This course does not count toward the 128 units (crs.) necessary for graduation.

Service Courses in Education 400 1 unit (cr.)
Assessment of Dyslexia
This course is designed to prescribe the assessment procedures, both Norm and Criterion Referenced, that are needed to identify the presence of dyslexia in individuals 5 years of age through adulthood. Course participants will be required to do a "write up" on the administration of three assessment batteries. 400/600

Service Courses in Education 405 3 units (crs.)
Survival in the Classroom
This course is designed to help teachers identify and explore solutions to fundamental problems of instruction and discipline. 405/605

Service Courses in Education 421 1-3 units (crs.)
Contemporary Topics in Education
Focuses upon professional growth through problem solving, self expression, group thinking and independent study. Educators work on problems growing out of their professional needs. Course may be repeated with change of topic to a maximum of 9 units (crs.). Prerequisite: A practicing professional educator. Pass/Fail course. 421/621

Service Courses in Education 422 1-3 units (crs.)
Contemporary Issues in Education
The focus of this course is on professional growth and development via exploration of theory and practice related to current issues and educational initiatives. Courses may be repeated with change of topic to a maximum of 9 units (crs.). 422/622

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Special Education 99 3 units (crs.)
Direct Instruction Basic Algebra (Project Success)
This course is designed to provide Project Success students who have successfully completed the Project Success summer transition program with additional skills in mathematical problem solving, knowledge of fundamental number properties and operations, use of the calculator as an aid to solving algebraic problems, and reading of mathematical expressions. This course does not count toward the 128 units (crs.) necessary for graduation. Prerequisite: Project Success summer transition program and official acceptance into the Project Success program.

Special Education 100 3 units (crs.)
Remediation of Specific Language Handicaps in Reading and Spelling
This course is designed to provide Project Success students with systematic drill with phonemes, affixes, and roots. A systemactic direct instructional approach is used to develop the ability to read and, therefore, comprehend college-level textbooks and materials. Similar drill is employed to teach spelling. In addition, syllabication for both reading and spelling purposes is also taught. This course does not apply for undergraduate degree credit. Open only to students in Project Success.

Special Education 101 1 unit (cr.)
Simultaneous Multi-Sensory Instructional Procedure Lab
The purpose of this lab is to provide Project Success students who have completed Special Education 100 with review and practice of the Simultaneous Multi-Sensory Instructional Procedures (SMSIP) that are used to decode and encode words. Students also learn and practice the use of SMSIP techniques with college level reading materials and written expression assignments. The lab will provide supervised faculty guidance for the Project Success students needing additional experience to efficiently perform the SMSIP techniques. This course may be taken twice. Unit (cr.) earned does not count toward university graduation requirements.

Special Education 352 3 units (crs.)
Children and Youth with Disabilities in General Education
This course is designed to provide a rigorous overview of current best practice in academic and behavioral methods for maintaining students with disabilities in general education settings. Particular emphasis is placed on high incidence disabilities such as learning disabilities, behavior disorders, cognitive disabilities, and language and speech disorders. Prerequisite: 2.75 GPA. 352/552

Special Education 353 3 units (crs.)
Characteristics of Children and Youth with Disabilities
This course primarily addresses three interrelated topics regarding specific types of disabilities. Interrelated topic areas are: (1) criteria for identification, (2) characteristics of individuals, and (3) causes. Prerequisite: 2.75 GPA. 353/553

Special Education 370 4 units (crs.)
Practicum Experience in Special Education
A series of two 4 week, full day, supervised field placements within public school institutions which deal with students with disabilities, including learning and cognitive disabilities and emotional/behavioral disorders. This course is designed to provide students in special education the opportunity to observe classroom interactions, to participate in instructional planning, and to teach students on an individual, small group, and large group basis. This is the first of several pre-service teaching experiences. Prerequisite: Admission into sophomore practicum.

Special Education 372 2 units (crs.)
Interim Practicum
An optional supervised field placement offered as an additional experience for students who have completed Special Education 370 (Sophomore Practicum), but need or want one extra placement. Open to College of Education and Human Services students only with consent of department chairperson.

Special Education 380 3 units (crs.)
Curriculum and Instruction in Special Education
Students will be introduced to factors that influence curriculum content, scope and sequence, preparation and evaluation of curricular strategies, and materials. A major focus of this course will be extensive student involvement in curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation. Pre/Co-requisite: Special Education 353/553. 380/580

Special Education 381 3 units (crs.)
Behavior Change and Management
Theoretical and practical understanding of methods used in modifying behavior in general, and problem behavior in particular. Methods of controlling behavior will be drawn from research and applied to the classroom. Approaches are developed to anticipate, inhibit, redirect, and prevent problem behavior through techniques which have high probability of encouraging the total learning process. 381/581

Special Education 401 2 units (crs.)
Advanced Practicum Experience in Special Education
This is a field-based experience where special education majors will directly work with children and youth with disabilities birth to age 21. Special Education majors will receive experience in assessment and instructional remediation practices. Registration will be concurrent with a special education methods course. This field-based experience will occur within one or two terms prior to student teaching. Pass/Fail course. 401/601

Special Education 406 3 units (crs.)
Technology in Special Education
This course is to address uses of technology that are specifically related to special education, such as assistive and adaptive technology, and augmentative communication. It will address classroom arrangements for use of technology, uses of technology for content area instruction, and word processing technology for special learners. It will also address legal issues related to the provision of technology and methods of using technology to collaborate with other professionals and to gain information about special education. Prerequisite: Sophomore practicum or equivalent coursework and Educational Leadership 325. 406/606

Special Education 412 3 units (crs.)
Assessment and Curriculum in Early Intervention: Birth to Three
This course will address information necessary to prepare future early interventionists to work with young children ages birth to three years and their families. A family-based, interagency focused approach is outlined in current legislation. Special focus will be given to the unique features of birth to three service delivery models currently in place across the State of Wisconsin and the United States. This course is a required course in the Early Childhood Special Education Teacher Licensure sequence. It complements Assessment and Curriculum for Children with Disabilities Ages Three through Eight Years. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 311, Sophomore Practicum or equivalent coursework and P-K-3 requirements (Elementary Education 312, 313, 314 and 318) taken prior to or concurrently. 412/612

Special Education 413 3 units (crs.)
Assessment and Curriculum for Children with Disabilities Ages Three to Eight Years
This course will focus on the best practices in assessment and curricula for young children with suspected or identified disabilities ages three through eight years. Issues related to service provision in preschool and early primary environments will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on linking assessment finding to intervention practices. Inter- and transdisciplinary team models will be explored as a way to provide quality educational services to young children in the least restrictive environment. Methods to embed and monitor individual education plan goals in the daily routine will be discussed. Information in this course complements content included in the "Assessment and Curriculum in Early Intervention: Birth to Three". Prerequisite: Elementary Education 311, Sophomore Practicum or equivalent coursework and P-K-3 requirements (Elementary Education 312, 313, 314 and 318) taken prior to or concurrently. 413/613

Special Education 414 3 units (crs.)
Advocacy, Family Empowerment, and Special Education Law
This course addresses three interrelated topics: (1) the role and responsibility of special education professionals to serve as advocates for students with disabilities and their families, (2) the skills and strategies needed by special education professionals to effectively support, collaborate with, and empower families of students with disabilities, and (3) special education legal issues.

Special Education 418 1 unit (cr.)
Problems in Teaching EC:SE Students
This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching EC:SE students. Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed. The course is taken concurrently with Special Education 419. Prerequisite: Admission II. 418/618

Special Education 419 5-10 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in EC:SE
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experiences under supervision in a class of early childhood special education students. Prerequisite: Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 418. 419/619

Special Education 423 3 units (crs.)
Direct Instruction Multisensory Methods for Teaching Decoding and Encoding
This course is designed to train individuals how to teach both decoding (reading) and encoding (spelling) to dyslexic students by means of direct instruction and appropriate practice strategies. Issues associated with dyslexia and related reading disabilities will be discussed. The emphasis will be on instruction that uses teaching methods to teach word meaning using the Simultaneous Multi-Sensory Paradigm. Additionally, the course is designed to meet the methodological needs of current and future teachers who work with or anticipate working with students who have difficulty learning to read and/or spell, whether they have been diagnosed as dyslexic or not. 423/623

Special Education 431 3 units (crs.)
Adolescents with Learning and Behavior Problems Best Practices in Middle School and Sec Settings
This course is designed to provide a rigorous overview of current best practice in assessment, curricula, instruction, and transition for students with learning and behavior problems in middle school and secondary settings. Course content will include the following topic areas as they relate to adolescents: legal issues and legislation, problems and issues, service delivery models, transition, academic and behavioral interventions, curricula, and assessment. 431/631

Special Education 463 3 units (crs.)
Teaching Students with Significant Disabilities
This course examines functional curricula, instructional practices and functional behavioral assessment and support for students with severe disabilities. Additional topics include working collaboratively with related services personnel, the use of assistive technology in educational programming, supervising paraprofessionals in the classroom, and teaching self-advocacy skills. 463/663

Special Education 464 2-6 units (crs.)
Practice in Teaching
Participation, observation, and responsible teaching experiences with nondisabled students in regular education classrooms. This course is required for all undergraduate special education majors who are not also seeking licensure in elementary or secondary education. Prerequisite: Elementary Education 360, Special Education 370, Reading Education 305, and at least one of the following: Elementary Education 311 or 384. Application required. Forms are available in the Field Experience office, Nur/Ed 113. Pass/Fail course.

Special Education 465 1-2 units (crs.)
Problems in Teaching Individuals with Mental Retardation/Cognitive Disabilities
This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching mentally retarded/cognitively disabled students. Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed. Prerequisite: Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 466. 465/665

Special Education 466 5-10 units (crs.)
Student Teaching of Individuals with Mental Retardation/Cognitive Disabilities
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experience under supervision in a class for mentally retarded, cognitively disabled children. Restricted to special education majors. Prerequisite: Admission II. 466/666

Special Education 467 1-2 units (crs.)
Problems in Teaching Individuals with Learning Disabilities
This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching learning disabled students. Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed. Prerequisite: Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 468. 467/667

Special Education 468 5-10 units (crs.)
Student Teaching of Individuals with Learning Disabilities
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experience under supervision in a class for children with learning disabilities. Prerequisite: Admission II. 468/668

Special Education 469 2 units (crs.)
Field Experience in Special Education
This field experience is designed for emergency licensed special education teachers without any previous special education teaching experience. This experience allows the students to visit, observe, and study several special education classrooms. Students must submit written observational reports of their classroom visits and prepare a program comparison/contrast paper. Registration is restricted to emergency licensed special education teachers who are unable to complete Special Education 370. Pass/Fail course.

Special Education 470 3 units (crs.)
Fundamentals in Special Education Assessment
This course deals with the appropriate selection, administration, and interpretation of assessment techniques and measures in order to identify students for special education. The course will familiarize the student with basic assessment terminologies and principles as well as various tests measuring achievement, aptitude, readiness, and social skills. The emphasis of this course is on making eligibility rather than instructional planning decision-making. 470/670

Special Education 471 3 units (crs.)
Assessment for Instructional Planning in Special Education
This course provides students with hands-on experience in assessment procedures through observation, administration, and interpretation of formal and informal assessment measures, including curriculum-based assessment. Students will write IEPs and plan instructional lessons with monitoring techniques. Prerequisite: Special Education 353/553 and 470/670. 471/671

Special Education 480 3 units (crs.)
Direct Instruction Strategies
This course presents a general approach to instructional strategies for special education. Topics covered will include principles of design, implementation, delivery and evaluation of effectiveness of direct instruction educational interventions. Prerequisite (for undergraduate students only): Sophomore Practicum or equivalent coursework, Reading 305, Elementary Education 360, Special Education 470/670, Special Education 471/671 (may be taken concurrently). This course should be taken the last term prior to student teaching. 480/680

Special Education 481 3 units (crs.)
Advanced Behavior Management and Instruction
This course builds upon effective behavior management and instruction concepts, principles, and techniques covered in Special Education 381/581 and Special Education 480/680. Course emphasis is on understanding the process of behavioral change, instructional classroom management, self-management strategies, crisis intervention, social skills instruction, study and organizational skills, and metacognitive strategies. Prerequisite: Sophomore Practicum or equivalent coursework and Special Education 480/680 (may be taken concurrently). 481/681

Special Education 482 2 units (crs.)
Practicum in Adaptive Physical Education for Special Education
Supervised field experience with special education students working within existing programs in adaptive physical education. Designed for physical education teachers seeking licensure for adaptive physical education. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Physical Education and Health Promotion 482. 482/682

Special Education 483 1-2 units (crs.)
Problems in Teaching Individuals with Emotional/ Behavioral Disorders
This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching emotionally/behaviorally disturbed students. Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed. Prerequisite: Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 484. 483/683

Special Education 484 5-10 units (crs.)
Student Teaching of Individuals with Emotional/ Behavioral Disorders
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experiences under supervision in a class of emotionally disturbed students. Prerequisite: Admission II and concurrent enrollement in Special Education 483. 484/684

Special Education 485 1 unit (cr.)
Problems in Special Education Teaching I
This course will deal with the problems associated with teaching students in early childhood: special education or students in cross categorical special education programs (students labeled as learning disabled, emotionally/behaviorally disordered, or mentally retarded/cognitively disabled). Innovative programs and intervention strategies will be discussed and analyzed. Prerequisite: Admission II and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 486/686. 485/685

Special Education 486 5 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Special Education I
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experience under supervision in either a class for early childhood: special education students or in a cross categorical special education class (learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders, or mental retardation/cognitive disabilities). Prerequisite: Admission II, restricted to special education majors, and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 485/685.

Special Education 488 2-6 units (crs.)
Seminar in Comparative Special Education
Provisions made by countries outside of the U.S. for dealing with exceptional children. On-site visits for in-depth exploration of programs will be planned. Small seminar groups will be arranged with university and on-site facility faculty.

Special Education 490 5 units (crs.)
Student Teaching in Special Education II
Observation, participation, and responsible teaching experience under supervision in either a class for early childhood: special education students or in a cross categorical special education class (learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders, or mental retardation/cognitive disabilities). Prerequisite: Admission II, restricted to special education majors, and concurrent enrollment in Special Education 489/689.

Special Education 496 1-3 units (crs.)
Independent Study
See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements. Permission of department chairperson required.
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Last Updated July 1, 2001