UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN OSHKOSH

Course Offerings - CHEMISTRY


32-101 General, Organic and Biochemistry (NS) (3+2) 1-4 cr. (Fall-Spring)

Matter, energy, atomic structure, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, solutions, chemical equilibrium; organic chemistry topics of nomenclature and hydrocarbons. Together with 32-102, constitutes a terminal course sequence designed for students desiring or required to have one year of chemistry with an organic and biochemistry emphasis.
32-102 General, Organic and Biochemistry (NS) (3+2) 1-4 cr. (Fall-Spring)
A continuation of 32-101 covering the organic chemistry topics of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, amines and the biochemistry topics of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, and metabolism. Prerequisite: 32-101 with a grade of "C" or better.

32-103 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (NS) (3+2) 4 cr. (Spring)

The chemistry of such environmentally relevant topics as air pollution, ozone depletion, water pollution, acid rain, solid waste disposal and energy production will be covered. Occasionally, tangentially related topics such as drug design and nutrition may also be discussed. This course is intended as a terminal chemistry/science course for nonscience students and as an introduction to chemistry for students with litter or no high school preparation. Prerequisites: None. 32-103 is not a prerequisite for higher level chemistry courses.
32-105 General Chemistry I (NS) (4+3) 1-5 cr. (Fall-Spring)
Fundamental laws and concepts of chemistry: atomic theory, atomic and electronic structure, chemical bonding, mole concept, nomenclature, stoichiometry, states of matter, formulas and equations, solutions and colloids. A foundation course with greater emphasis on the theoretical and mathematical aspects of chemistry than in 32-101. Designed for students taking chemistry beyond the first year course. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent enrollment in mathematics 67-103. Recommend high school chemistry background.
32-106 General Chemistry II (NS) (4+3) 1-5 cr. (Fall-Spring)
A continuation of 32-105: kinetics and chemical equilibrium, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, molecular structure, chemistry of metals and selected non-metals. Laboratory to include qualitative analysis. Together with 32-105, constitutes the foundation course for further course work in chemistry. Prerequisite: 32-105 with a grade of "C" or better. Chemistry 32-101 and 32-102 may be substituted for 32-105 with the consent of the instructor.
32-109 General Chemistry (NS) (4+3) 5 cr. (Fall)
Mathematical emphasis placed on major topics of chemical structure including atomic and electronic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, and states of matter; and of chemical relationships including stoichiometry, kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, and redox reactions and electrochemistry. Recommend 1-1/2 to 2 years of high school chemistry or 1 year of high school chemistry with a "B" average. Prerequisite: Chemistry Placement Exam and credit or concurrent enrollment in 67-108. Designed for qualified students who have taken no previous college chemistry and intend to take chemistry beyond the first course.
32-110 Honors: General Chemistry (NS) (4+3) 5 cr. (Fall)
The same course content and prerequisites as 32-109. Prerequisite: University Scholars only.
32-221 Quantitative Analysis (3+6) 1-5 cr. (Fall-Spring)
Emphasis on ionic solution equilibria as applied to analytical chemistry. Specifically, statistical analysis of data, theoretical principles of solubility, acid-base, redox and complex equilibria discussed stressing calculations involving system constants and species concentrations. Laboratory techniques to include gravimetric, volumetric, potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods with stress on quantitative determinations of inorganic and organic species and system constants. Prerequisites: 32-106 or 32-109 or 32-110 with a grade of "C" or better.
32-235 Organic Chemistry I (3+3) 1-4 cr. (Fall-Spring)
Major topics include nomenclature, reactions and mechanisms of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and their halogen derivatives; aromaticity; qualitative molecular orbital approach to bonding and structure; and stereochemistry. Techniques; methods for separation, purification, and identification of organic compounds; and syntheses are included in the laboratory work. Prerequisites: 32-106 or 32-109, or 32-110 with a grade of "C" or better.
32-303/503 Biochemistry I: Clinical Emphases 3 cr. (Fall)

This course is the first semester of the two-semester sequence (32-303/503 and 32-305/505) for the Professional Emphasis Chemistry Major Biochemistry option. This course replaces 32-301. It serves as a terminal course for Medical Technology majors, and those of other clinically oriented programs, when taken with the 32-304/504 Laboratory. Topics include: Amino acids, proteins, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, carbohydrates, lipids, hormones, vitamins, electrolytes, and xenobiotics. Clinical correlations will be presented which emphasize: biochemistry, pathophysiology, and quantification of body fluid constituents. Prerequisites: 32-221 or 26-372, 32-335, or consent of the instructor. Graduate students are required to submit an additional paper.
32-304/504 Biochemistry I: Clinical Emphases Laboratory 2 cr. (Fall)

This laboratory is required for Medical Technology majors and is recommended for those in other clinically-oriented programs (e.g., premed., prevet.). Laboratory experiences are correlated to topics presented in 32-303/503. (Note: Students electing the Biochemistry option may take the 32-3-4/504 laboratory in addition to required 32-306/506 laboratory.) Techniques include aspects of spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, chromatography, immunoassays, fluorescence, and computer applications. A significant amount of writing is expected. Some of the laboratory modules utilize a cooperative learning/small group approach to problem solving reminiscent of a clinical laboratory setting. Pre(co)requisites: 32-303. (Qualified Biology or Microbiology majors may take 32-304/504 without taking 32-303/503 with the consent of the instructor.)
32-305/505 Biochemistry II: Lec 3 cr. (Spring)

This course is the second semester of The two-semester sequence (32-303/503 and 32-305/505) for the Professional Emphasis Chemistry Major Biochemistry option. This course replaces 32-302/502. Topics focus on the more chemical aspects of: proteins, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, bioenergetics, carbohydrates, and lipid chemistry presented in 32-303/503. Students (e.g., Microbiology majors) with sufficient background may enroll without taking 32-303/503, with consent of the instructor. Additional topics include: nucleic acid structure, conformation, repair, and processing, and recombinant technology; protein translation; and regulation; and regulating of gene expression. The use of computer technology is expected. Graduate students are required to submit an additional paper. Prerequisite: 32-221, 32-335, or consent of the instructor.

32-306/506 Biochemistry II: Laboratory 2 cr. (Spring)

This laboratory is required for students electing the ACS Chemistry Major Professional Emphasis Biochemistry Option. Laboratory experiences are correlated to topics presented in 32-305/505. (Note: biochemistry majors may take the 32-304/504 laboratory in addition to required 32-305/506 laboratory.) Techniques include: spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and computer modeling. A significant amount of writing is expected. Some of the laboratory modules utilize a cooperative learning approach to problem solving. Pre(co)requisites: 32-305 or consent of instructor. (Qualified Biology or Microbiology majors may take 32-304/504 without taking 32-303/503, with the consent of the instructor.

32-310/510 Chemistry Workshop for K-12 Teachers 1-3 cr.

This course is intended to be a workshop in Chemistry for K-12. The focus will be on activities to improve the effectiveness of the classroom teacher. The course does not apply to any graduate degree program at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh.
32-320 Introduction to Instrumental Analysis (2+3) 3 cr. (Spring)
A survey of modern instrumental techniques commonly employed in modern chemical laboratories including spectroscopic, absorption and emission analysis, conductance, pH measurements, polarography, separations, automatic titrations and radiochemical tracer techniques. Prerequisite: 32-221 and 32-335 or consent of instructor. Credit may not be obtained in both 32-320 and 32-421.
32-323/523 Analytical Separations (2+3) 3 cr. (Fall-every other)
The principles and theoretical foundations, experimental variables, and applications of solvent extraction and the primary chromatographic techniques, including: column, liquid-liquid, ion exchange, paper, thin-layer, gas-liquid and other recent modern chromatographic methods. The laboratory will involve applications of the above to demonstrate the utility of the methods. To count as an elective towards the professional Chemistry major, credit or concurrent enrollment in 32-347, and a special project, are required. Prerequisites: 32-221 and 32-335.
32-330 Scientific Glassblowing (0+3) 1 cr.
Fundamental principles of scientific glassblowing. Practice in the basic techniques and the development of skill in the art of glassblowing. Introduction to the use of the glass lathe and the design of complex equipment. Prerequisites: two years of chemistry, and the consent of instructor.
32-335/535 Organic Chemistry II (3+3) 1-4 cr. (Fall-Spring)
A continuation of 32-235 which includes a discussion of alcohols, phenols, ethers, carbonyl containing compounds, amines, anilines, carbohydrates and proteins. Particular emphasis is placed on the mechanistic and theoretical aspects of the various topics covered. Infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopies are discussed in a qualitative manner. Laboratory includes advanced synthesis work and introductory, qualitative organic analysis emphasizing modern spectral techniques. Prerequisite: 32-235 with a grade of "C" or better.
32-336/536 Advanced Organic Laboratory (0+3) 1 cr. (Spring)
A continuation of the laboratory in 32-335, which includes qualitative organic analysis, advanced synthesis and/or independent special projects. Prerequisites: 32-335 with a grade of "C" or better.
32-347/547 Physical Chemistry I (3+0) 3 cr. (Fall)
Fundamental principles of physical chemistry. Topics include ideal and real gases, kinetic theory, thermodynamics and thermochemistry, chemical equilibria, phase equilibria, properties of solutions and surface and colloid chemistry. Prerequisites: Credit in 67-172; 32-221 and 32-235. Credit or concurrent enrollment in 82-110.
32-348/548 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (0+3) 1 cr. (Fall)
Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the material presented in Chemistry 32-347. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent enrollment in 32-347.
32-349/549 Physical Chemistry II (3+0) 3 cr. (Spring)
A continuation of Chemistry 32-347. Topics include: electrochemistry, quantum chemistry, elementary statistical mechanics, atomic and molecular spectra, chemical kinetics, photochemistry and transport properties of liquids and gases. Prerequisite: 32-347 and 67-273.
32-351/551 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (0+3) 1 cr. (Spring)
Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the material presented in 32-347 and 32-349. Prerequisite or corequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in 32-349.
32-360/560 Special Topics 1-3 cr.
A chemistry course on a topic not covered in the department's curriculum. This course may be repeated with different content. Each time it is offered, the topic will be announced in the class schedule. This course will not offer topics which are covered by existing courses. Graduate students will be required to do an extra project or paper. Prerequisites: consent of Instructor.
32-421/621 Instrumental Analysis (2+3) 3 cr. (Fall)
Theory and application of instrumentation to chemical analysis. Discussion of system constraints, used for measurement, instrument design, constraints, and chemical applications; electronics, spectroscopic methods including uv-visible, infrared, flame, and magnetic resonance; and electrochemical methods including potentiometry, polarography, amperometry, coulometry and modern electroanalytical procedures. Laboratory to stress instrumental determination of physical constants, methods comparison and quantitative determination of system species using the above. Prerequisites: 32-221 and 32-349. Credit may not be obtained in both 32-320 and 32-421/621.
32-435/635 Interpretive Spectroscopy (2+3) 3 cr. (Spring-every other)
The application of spectral methods to the characterization of the structure of inorganic and organic compounds will be presented. Specific topics will include infrared, Raman, ultraviolet and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies and mass spectrometry. The laboratory will involve the use of these techniques to identify the structure of unknown samples. Prerequisites: 32-335/535 or consent of instructor and credit or consurrent enrollment in 32-347.
32-446 Independent Study/Research (0+3 to 9) 1-3 cr. (Fall-Spring)
Supervised research in chemistry. See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.
32-452/652 Polymer Science (2+3) 3 cr.
An introduction to the study of the chemistry of macromolecules including: polymerization reactions and kinetics, physical and chemical characterization methods, and the relationship between chemical and mechanical properties. Prerequisites: 32-349.
32-456 Related Readings (0+3 to 9) 1-3 cr. (Fall-Spring)
Supervised readings in Chemistry. See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies Information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.
32-461/661 Inorganic Chemistry (3+0) 3 cr. (Fall)
Major topics are group theory; atomic and electronic structure; coordination chemistry, including comparison and discussion of current bonding theories; applicability of several types of spectroscopy to inorganic chemistry; introduction to organometallic chemistry. Prerequisites: 32-335 and credit or concurrent enrollment in 32-349.
32-463/663 Inorganic Laboratory (0+3) 1 cr. (Spring)
Techniques and syntheses emphasized. Includes reaction chemistry and mechanisms of main group and transition metal compounds. Preparation of coordination complexes and organometallic compounds by inert atmosphere, high temperature, nonaqueous and vacuum techniques, and their isolation and characterization. Prerequisites: Credit in 32-461.
32-474 Honors: Thesis 1-6 cr.
Prerequisites: University scholar status and junior standing. Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study e.g. a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be "Honors Thesis." Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Maximum of 6 credits.
Preparation of a formal seminar paper based on research, an industrial internship, and/or a thorough review of a specific area from the chemical literature, followed by an oral seminar based on this paper. Prerequisites: Chemistry major with junior standing.

32-490 Chemistry Seminar (1+0) 0-1 cr. (Fall-Spring)

Oral presentation of scientific papers, research, or selected topics which require a thorough study and use of the chemical literature. Prerequisites: Chemistry major with junior standing.
32-495 Chemistry Research Internship (0+3 to 18) 1-6 cr. (Summer, if available)
An off-campus research experience in an industrial/academic/governmental laboratory under the joint supervision of the department and participating agency. Prerequisites: Application and admission into the program six months prior to the commencement of the internship. Normally, course work through 32-349 must be completed prior to the internship.
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Last Updated July 1, 1999