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Quin M. Chrobak, Ph.D.

Associate Professor & Graduate Program Coordinator

Office: CLOW F025
Phone: (920) 424-2307
Email: chrobakq@uwosh.edu

  • B.A. (Psychology), Drew University (Madison, NJ) – 2002
  • M.A. (Psychology), American University (Washington, DC) – 2005
  • Ph.D. (Experimental Psychology) Kent State University (Kent, OH) – 2010

My program of research is focused on understanding how memory and cognition operate in complex real world situations.  Specifically, I am interested in distortions in memory, the mechanisms that underlie these errors (e.g., source monitoring) and the application of such mechanisms to situations that involve the suggestibility of eyewitness testimony.  I have two primary lines of research related to that topic.  First, I am interested in how the desire for a coherent mental representation of a witnessed event may induce people to develop false memories for information that is causal in nature. Specifically, my research suggests that people are particularly susceptible to developing false memories for misinformation if it helps explains some witnessed outcome/event (e.g., Rindal, Chrobak, Zaragoza, & Weihing, in press; Chrobak & Zaragoza, 2013).  Second, I am interested in how the format of interview questions influences the accuracy of testimony provided by eyewitnesses. It is well established that in the court of law, lawyers will use complex questions (also referred to as “lawyerese”) in order to confuse witnesses, and thus cast doubt on the accuracy of their testimony.  My research has shown that while such questions impair accuracy of all participants, it is particularly detrimental for participants that had been exposed to misleading false information about the originally witnessed event prior to being questioned (Chrobak, Rindal, & Zaragoza, 2015).

Currently Teaching: Cognitive Psychology (Psych 380); Special Topics: Mind, Memory, and the Law (Psych 490); Advanced Research (Psych 480)

Recent Publications

  • Rindal, E., Chrobak, Q.M., Zaragoza, M.S., & Weihing, C. (in press). Mechanisms of eyewitness testimony: Tests of the explanatory role hypothesis. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review.
  • Shakeel, M.K., Docherty, N.M., Rich, P.R., Zaragoza, M.S., Chrobak, Q.M., & McCleery, A. (2016). Analyzing confabulations in schizophrenia and healthy participants. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 22(9), 911-919.
  • Chrobak, Q.M., Groves, C.L., & Otradovec, T. (2016). The impact of outcome valence on the susceptibility to suggestion for post-event causal information. The Journal of General Psychology, 143(1), 16-32.
  • Lishner, D.A., Groves, C.L., & Chrobak, Q.M. (2015). Are violent video game-agression researchers biased? Aggression and Violent Behavior, 25, 75-78
  • Chrobak, Q.M., Rindal, E.J., & Zaragoza, M.S. (2015). The impact of multifaceted questions on eyewitness accuracy following forced fabrication interviews. The Journal of General Psychology, 142(3), 150-166.
  • Chrobak, Q.M., & Zaragoza, M.S. (2013). The misinformation effect: Past research and recent advances. In A. Ridley, F. Gabbert, & D. La Rooy (Eds.), Suggestibility in legal contexts: Psychological research and forensic implications (pp. 21-44). London: Wiley Blackwell.
  • Chrobak, Q.M., & Zaragoza, M.S. (2013). When forced fabrications become truth: Causal explanations and false memory development. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. 142(3), 827-844.
  • Chrobak, Q.M., & Winterrowd, E. (Jan, 2013). Landing your first teaching job: Tips from two recent hires. Invited online article. Association of Psychological Science Observer, 26(1). Retrieved from http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/publications/ observer/2013/january-13/landing-your-first-teaching-job-tips-from-two-recent-hires.html
  • Chrobak, Q.M. & Zaragoza, M.S. (2009). The cognitive consequences of forced confabulation: Evidence from studies of eyewitness suggestibility. In W. Hirstein (Ed.). Confabulation: Views from Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Psychology, and Philosophy (pp. 67-90). New York: Oxford.
  • Chrobak, Q.M. & Zaragoza, M.S. (2008). Inventing stories: Forcing witnesses to fabricate entire fictitious events leads to freely reported false memories. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 15(6), 1190-1195.

Recent Conference Presentations

  • Johnson, H. N., Gilson, S.L., Steinert, S.W., Bowe, K.L., Braun, B.E., Schreifels, P.E., & Chrobak, Q.M. (2016, November). The effect of suggested misinformation and multifaceted questions on memory for witnessed events. Poster presented to the Psychonomic Society, Boston M.A.
  • Johnson, A.A. & Chrobak, Q.M. (2016). Conflict detection as a mechanism for analytical processing: Evidence from the misinformation paradigm. Poster presented to the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.
  • Drew, A.D., Karst, A., Koch, J., Chrobak, Q.M., & Heiny, E. (2015, October). The N1pc and localization of visual information. Poster presented to the Society for Neurscience, Chicago, Illinois.
  • Bivens, S.A., Steinert, S.W., Weihing, C.A., & Chrobak, Q.M. (2015, May). The impact of personal relevance on the continued influence effect. Poster presented to the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, Illinois.
  • Rindal, E., Chrobak, Q.M., Zaragoza, M.S., & Weihing, C. (2014, November). Mechanisms of eyewitness suggestibility: A test of the explanatory role hypothesis. Poster presented to the Psychonomic Society, Long Beach, California.
  • Rindal, E., Chrobak, Q.M., & Zaragoza, M.S. (2013, November). Explanatory coherence and false recollection of suggested events. Poster presented to the Psychonomic Society, Toronto, Canada.
  • Chrobak, Q.M. (2013, May). Unexpectedness of witnessed outcomes predicts false memory development for suggested causal information. Paper presented to the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago Illinois.
  • Groves, C.L., Lishner, D.A., & Chrobak, Q.M. (2012, May). The lone gunman effect:The impact of character role and social mode of play on the relationship between violent video games and aggression. Paper presented to the Midwestern Psychology Association, Chicago, Illinois.
  • Chrobak, Q.M., & Groves, C.L. (2011, November). The good, the bad, and the neutral:The role of outcome type in the susceptibility to suggestion for post-event causal information.  Poster presented to the Psychonomic Society, Seattle, Washington.
  • Chrobak, Q.M. & Zaragoza, M.S. (2010, November).  Sentence complexity predicts false assents to previously fabricated entire fictitious events.  Poster presented to the Psychonomic Society, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • Chrobak, Q.M. & Zaragoza, M.S. (2009, November).  Causal connections and the development of false memories for entire fabricated events:  The role of alternative explanations. Poster presented to the Psychonomic Society, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Chrobak, Q.M., Gartner, R.L., & Zaragoza, M.S. (2009, May). False memories for entire fabricated events:  The role of causality. Paper presented to the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, Illinois.
  • Zaragoza, M.S., Blanche, J., Chrobak, Q.M. Mitchell, K.J., & Palmeri, P. (2007, November). Memory binding deficits in college students with trauma histories. Poster presented to the Psychonomic Society, Long Beach, California.

Link to CV

by schrod69 — last modified Aug 15, 2017 07:48 AM
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