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University Assessment Plan

Word Document of Plan

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Assessment Plan

(Approved by Faculty Senate on May 15, 2013)

CONTENTS:

I.   The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and Its Mission
II.  Learning Outcome
III. Overview of the Assessment Plan
IV. Purpose of Assessment
V. Assessment Governance
VI. Assessment of the University Studies Program
     A.Description of the University Studies Program
     B. University Studies Program Outcomes                                        
             i.    USP Program Outcomes – First Year (Quest I, Quest II and Explore)
             ii.    USP Program Outcomes – Second Year (Quest III and Explore)
             iii.    USP Program Outcome – Connect Course
     C. Direct Assessments of University Studies Program
     D. Indirect Assessments of University Studies Program
VII. Assessment of Undergraduate and Graduate Programs
     A. Evaluation for Program Assessment Plans
VIII. University-wide Assessment
     A. Descriptions and Administration of University-wide Assessments
IX. Reporting: University-wide Assessment
     A. Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA)
     B. Oshkosh Student Achievement Report (OSAR)
     C. National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)
     D. Oshkosh Survey of Student Engagement (OSSE)
X. Summary
XI. Appendix:  Expectations for the Biennial Program Assessment Report

 

                       

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh is a regional, public, comprehensive university governed by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System. UW Oshkosh offers 30 undergraduate and 16 graduate programs in the colleges of: 1) Business, 2) Education and Human Services, 3) Letters and Science, 4) Nursing, and 5) through the division of Life Long Learning and Community Engagement.

I.        The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and Its Mission

 II.        Learning Outcomes

 The University offers a wide range of academic programs at various levels (bachelor’s, certificate programs, master’s and professional doctorate) in many different areas of specialization including business, nursing, education and arts and sciences. Each program, department and college has formally adopted its own mission statement and learning outcomes. In addition, the University also provides student learning outcomes of its University Studies Program, the general education program, addressed within an interdisciplinary and integrated framework. As an intentional effort to assist student to meet these learning outcomes, the University engages in ongoing assessment of student learning in a variety of contexts. Assessments take place at different levels, from an individual program, department, and college levels as well as the broader University Studies Program level.

UW Oshkosh Essential Learning Outcomes for Students

What follows is a listing of the Essential Learning Outcomes (approved by the Faculty Senate at its May 13, 2008, meeting) that includes a definition for each outcome drafted during Summer 2009 and revised and approved by the Liberal Education Reform Team in September 2009. It is the University Studies Program’s intent to use these outcomes to assess students without regard to disciplinary boundaries; students currently have opportunities to develop each outcome.

KNOWLEDGE:

1. Knowledge of Human Cultures involves understanding and appreciating the customs, values, and beliefs of diverse groups of people.

2. Knowledge of the Physical and Natural World requires scientific study of living systems and/or the world in which they exist.

SKILLS:

3. Critical Thinking involves engaging in appropriate inquiry, evaluation, and analysis of arguments, premises, evidence, and the strength of any logical connection between these items to defend or reject a given conclusion or decision.

4. Creative Thinking is intentionally developing original and appropriate ideas and outcomes.

5. Identification and Evaluation of Theories and Assumptions requires first understanding and articulating hypotheses, policies, or principles as well as the beliefs on which they are based and then using appropriate modes of research and analysis to determine their relative utility and worth.

6. Written Communication is the presentation of information, an idea, or an arguable position through composed language tailored for a specific occasion and/or audience.

7. Oral Communication is the spoken presentation of information, an idea, or an arguable position that is organized for and tailored to both occasion and audience.

8. Quantitative Literacy is the ability a) to explain, interpret, and evaluate equations, graphs, diagrams, and tables within social and professional contexts, and b) to convert relevant information into various mathematical forms.

9. Technical Literacy is the ability to use, analyze, and evaluate computer and communication technology.

10. Information Literacy is the ability to recognize when information is needed and to effectively locate, evaluate, and apply the needed information.

11. Teamwork requires such communication skills as listening, questioning, persuading, and negotiating and such organizational skills as goal development, responsibility assignment, timeline development, decision making, and record keeping, which, taken together, facilitate a group’s achievement of a common goal. Note: teamwork is not group work.

12. Leadership Skills include listening and teaching, planning, and directing group performance; evaluating the performance of the group and its members; counseling/coaching group members; and effectively representing the group.

13. Problem Solving requires applying to an unsettled question, an organized, systematic process consisting of appropriate tools and tactics that lead to a valid explanation.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

14. Knowledge of Sustainability and Its Applications is the ability to understand local and global Earth systems, the qualities of ecological integrity and the means to restore and preserve it, the interconnectedness of ecological integrity, economic well-being, and social justice, in order to analyze complex environmental, economic, and social issues and to respond effectively to them.

15. Civic Knowledge and Engagement entails understanding political and non-political processes that influence a local, state, national, or global community and applying skills and strategies that can affect the life of a community in positive ways.

16. Intercultural Knowledge and Competence is the ability to interact with different groups across a wide variety of social and professional contexts that require adaptation or cultural sensitivity.

17. Ethical Reasoning and Action involves three steps: 1) recognizing and evaluating moral issues and principles from multiple perspectives in personal, professional, and social situations; 2) adopting a position on those issues and principles; and 3) acting in accordance with that position. A course addressing this learning outcome examines one or more of these steps.

LEARNING:

18. Integrated, Synthesized, and Advanced Learning draws upon a variety of skills and knowledge gained during the college career and demonstrates the ability to see connections and adapt knowledge across general and specialized studies.

Also an approved Essential Learning Outcome:

19. Foundations and Skills for Lifelong Learning are emergent properties of a liberal education that encompasses all the other Essential Learning Outcomes. It is not expected to be assessed independently. 

III.        Overview of the UW Oshkosh Assessment Plan

 

The UW Oshkosh Assessment Plan describes assessment of student learning in all undergraduate and graduate programs including the University Studies Program and University-wide data. The plan divides assessment processes and reporting into three major areas: 1) University Studies Program, the general education program at the University, 2) undergraduate and graduate academic programs, and 3) University- wide assessment. Each of these processes is a part of university governance processes. Several assessment methodologies are used to assess student learning. The Assessment Plan is developed in compliance with the UW System assessment guidelines and the criteria of the Higher Learning Commission.

IV.        Purpose of Assessment

The general purpose of assessment is to improve student learning and to inform evaluations of the curriculum or programs through the collection of data about student learning and student experiences. This can be accomplished by: 1) exploring the relationship of student learning and the educational experiences offered by the University; 2) gathering evidence about student learning so that we know what and how students are learning in our programs including the University Studies Program; and 3) using the results to create appropriate responses to our programs. The campus uses an inquiry approach to assessment that involves posing questions and analyzing data about the learning process. Assessment is grounded in the identification and definition of learning outcomes. Faculty members and academic staff plan educational experiences, identify methods for assessment, determine the timeline for data collection, analysis, and reporting and use the data to make informed program responses. Assessment is guided by the following practices:

1. Assessment of learning reflects the University mission, vision and strategic priorities.

2. Assessment includes a wide range of educational experiences, both inside and outside of the classroom that influence student learning.

3. Assessments are developmental in nature and reflect learning over time.

4. Explicit learning outcomes are foundational to the assessment process.

5. The assessment process is collaborative and involves the entire university community.

6. The scholarship of teaching and learning is foundational to the assessment process.

7. Reports about assessment results are shared among the university community.

V.        Assessment and Governance 

Faculty governance and assistance provided by the Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs guide activities to develop and implement the University Assessment Plan. Assessment processes include collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and reporting assessment results to the University community. The University provides administrative support through the Office of the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Curricular Affairs and Student Academic Achievement and the Office of Institutional Research. Each program is responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating its own individual assessment plan. The following governance groups have responsibility for the assessment of student learning.

UW Oshkosh Faculty and Academic Staff Handbook: GOV 3.4 Faculty Senate Committee on the Assessment of Student Learning (FSCASL)

(A) Responsibilities: Coordinate assessment efforts including (but not limited to) assessment in verbal and quantitative areas; assessment of general education, University Studies Program; assessment of undergraduate major programs, assessment of graduate programs. Monitor assessment activity including publication of program goals in appropriate documents; integration of assessment into program review; connecting assessment to program improvement. Plan, including the development of university assessment plan; the development of professional development opportunities related to assessment; and determining budget requirements and advocating budgetary support for assessment activities.

(B) Membership: Twelve members. One faculty member (nominated by Committee on Committees and appointed by the Faculty Senate) from each of these constituencies: Fine and Performing Arts, Social Science, Math/Science, Humanities, Business Administration, Nursing, Education (total (7) members); one Faculty Senator appointed by Senate to serve as liaison to the Senate; two students appointed by OSA; one member of instructional academic staff appointed by the Senate of Academic Staff; one member appointed by the Provost and Vice Chancellor. The seven (7) faculty will serve three-year staggered terms. The Senate liaison term will be the same as the term as senator. OSA will decide student terms. The Senate of Academic Staff will decide the academic staff term.

(C) Chair: The Faculty Senate Executive Committee will select the chair from the membership. The term of the chair shall be for one year. The chair may be reappointed up to three years.

UW Oshkosh Faculty Handbook: GOV 3.2 University Studies Program Committee

(A)Responsibilities: The University Studies Committee is responsible for the management, review, assessment, and approval of courses for the University Studies Program. In carrying out this general charge, the committee will periodically review university studies requirements and curriculum and will formulate and recommend any policy changes it deems appropriate. The committee will develop criteria for approving courses that satisfy the University Studies requirements. The University Studies Committee will participate in any University-wide process to assess, plan or change the University Studies Program. Any proposals concerning the University Studies Program originating outside of the University Studies Committee will be received and considered by the committee. The committee may hold hearings on the University Studies Program or on any proposals concerning it and my submit proposals to a faculty referendum. All actions of the committee will be determined by a majority vote of the committee. All actions affecting the University Studies Program will be determined by recorded vote of the committee. The committee will forward its recommendations directly to the Faculty Senate. As it deems appropriate, the committee send its recommendations to other governance groups, such as the Chair of the Academic Policies Committee (APC), the University Registrar, the President of the Faculty Senate, the Chair of the University Assessment committee and the Provost.

(B) Membership: The committee consists of thirteen (13) members: seven (7) faculty members appointed by the Faculty Senate (to ensure that all three Professional Colleges and all four divisions of COLS are represented); one (1) Director of the University Studies Program; one (1) academic staff appointed by the Senate of Academic Staff; one (1) Director of the First Year Experience; one (1) Chair of the Faculty Senate Committee on Assessment of Student Learning (FSCASL); one (1) non-voting Provost Administrative Representative; and one (1) undergraduate student appointed by the Oshkosh Student Association. The seven (7) faculty members will serve three-year staggered terms so that the terms of all seven (7) do not end at the close of the same academic year. On first implementing staggered terms four (4) faculty will serve for two (2) years. The Director of the University Studies Program, the Director of the First Year Experience, the Chair of the FSCASL; and the Provost’s Administrative Representative will serve indefinite terms for the duration of their respective appointments. The student term will be for one (1) year. If a member does not attend meetings for a semester, that member’s position will be deemed vacant and filled as specified above.

(C) Chair: The Chair of the University Studies Committee will be elected by the members of the committee at its first meeting in the new academic year. The Chair must be a faculty member. The term of the Chair will be for one (1) year renewable for a maximum of three (3) years. The Chair serves on Academic Policies Committee (APC) and may be on additional APC committees.

(D) Reporting: The Chair of the University Studies Committee will forward a copy of the minutes of meetings to the President of the Faculty Senate.

VI.        Assessment of the University Studies Program

A. Description of the University Studies Program (USP):

The purpose of the University Studies Program at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh is to inspire intellectual curiosity in our students, encourage them to understand their responsibilities as educated people, and lay the foundation for the skills and knowledge that will enable them to succeed not only as university students, but also as engaged local and global citizens. The 41-credit program is structured around three interconnected areas: 1) Question; 2) Exploration; and 3) Connection. The USP also reinforces the goal of assisting students in developing responsibility for their own learning while underscoring the fact that knowledge is driven by inquiry. The program consists of three signature themes: 1) Sustainability and its applications; 2) Civic knowledge and engagement; 3) Intercultural knowledge and competence interpreted through the lens of academic disciplines. To build intellectual curiosity among students, these broad themes have in turn been phrased as Signature Questions, which provide the structure of the Quest portion of the USP.

  1. Quest

Incoming students will begin to question in a discipline-based first-year experience (FYE) course while concurrently enrolling in a second course focused upon the skills employers repeatedly name as the most crucial to the success in the 21st century. Among them is the ability to solve complex problems, to locate and evaluate information, to write and speak effectively, and to collaborate successfully with others. By enrolling in these paired courses in their first two semesters on campus, students will be placed in learning communities and will begin to examine the campus’ Signature Questions. By the end of their second year of study, they will have explored all three Signature Questions.

Quest I (1st semester paired courses): First-Year Experience (FYE) Quest I course + Writing (WBIS) or Speaking (COMM 111)

Quest II (2nd semester paired courses): Quest II course + Writing or Speaking

Quest III (3rd or 4th semester): The course has a community engagement project documented through an assessment.

2. Explore

While they question, students will also be engaged in the exploration of disciplinary ways of knowing. Students will explore the question of knowledge itself by engaging in the critical examination of disciplinary content, modeling skills and strategies used to explore that content, cultivating a methodological approach to accumulating, processing, and applying knowledge. Students will explore knowledge of Nature, Culture, and Society as delineated in the learning outcomes.  All Quest courses are also Explore courses.

3. Connect

After students have completed 15 USP credits, or the question components of the USP, they will enroll in a connection course, an advanced writing course, connect will further develop writing competence while synthesizing content related to all three of the signature questions. The connect course will also provide culminating opportunities for student reflection on the purpose and value of Liberal Education while serving as a USP assessment point to be included in the electronic portfolio.

4. Electronic Portfolio Assessment

The primary method for assessment in the USP will be an electronic portfolio process.  While students receive feedback on individual assignments in each USP course, they will also have an opportunity to reflect upon and synthesize the full contents of their electronic portfolio at distinct points in their academic careers. Fully integrated into the USP, this assessment plan supports a cohesive method to evaluate students’ Liberal Education at UW Oshkosh.

B. University Studies Program Outcomes

USP Program Outcomes-First Year (Quest I, Quest II and Explore only courses):

    • Students will be able to describe the value of a Liberal Education.
    • Students will become familiar with the expectations of a college-level education, the UW Oshkosh Essential Learning Outcomes, and the University Studies Program.
    • Students will begin their acculturation to life at this university, developing familiarity with the academic resources and community engagement opportunities at UW Oshkosh.
    • Students will engage in learning communities to enhance their connections to the class, the university, and one another.
    • Students will participate in campus and community life through co-curricular activities.
    • Students will begin to take personal responsibility for their intellectual development by archiving learning artifacts in the electronic portfolio.
    • Students will explore and question as they progress toward the knowledge, skills, and responsibilities of the Essential Learning Outcomes.

 

USP Program Outcomes-Second Year (Quest III Course and Explore only Courses):

    • Students will develop further connections to the university and/or the local community through a community-engagement project (the “Community Experience”) embedded in their Quest III course.
    • Students will be able to reflect upon the relationship between their educational experiences and their actions within communities.
    • Students will increase their awareness of the civic engagement responsibility of college-educated citizens.
    • Students will continue to explore and question as they progress toward the knowledge, skills, and responsibilities of the Essential Learning Outcomes.

 

USP Program Outcome-Connect Course (end of fourth or fifth semester):

    • Students will be able to demonstrate progress toward the knowledge, skills, and responsibilities of the Essential Learning Outcomes during their University Studies Program coursework through a guided reflection.

 

C. Direct Assessments of University Studies Program

Students upload artifacts in an electronic portfolio to demonstrate their learning across the University Studies Program. A faculty member assesses individual student artifacts at the course level.  USP courses will be assessed on a rotation by learning outcome and course type.  Faculty submit assessment reports for USP courses when the course appears on the assessment cycle.  The USP Committee reviews the aggregate ELO assessment data as a part of program assessment for the USP. Results of the University Studies Program direct assessments are a part of the Oshkosh Student Achievement Report (OSAR) which is published on an annual basis.

Direct Assessments:

USP Program Component

Outcomes

Cycle/Target Population

Writing Assessment (QUEST Writing: WBIS)

Written Communication and Information Literacy

Alternate years

Communication Assessment (QUEST Speaking: COMM 111)

Oral Communication and Information Literacy

Alternate years

Quest I

Select learning outcomes and

Knowledge of Sustainability or

Civic Knowledge and Engagement or

Intercultural Knowledge and Competence

 

Annual

Quest II

Select learning outcomes, Ethical Reasoning, and

Knowledge of Sustainability or

Civic Knowledge and Engagement  or

Intercultural Knowledge and Competence

 

Annual

Quest III

Select learning outcomes and

Knowledge of Sustainability or

Civic Knowledge and Engagement or

Intercultural Knowledge and Competence

 

Annual

Explore

Select learning outcomes and

Knowledge of Human Cultures/Society or

Knowledge of Physical and Natural World

 

Annual (Rotation among Explore categories: Nature, Culture, and Society)

Connect

Integrated, Synthesized and Advanced Learning; Written Communication

Annual

 D. Indirect Assessments of University Studies Program

Students complete program surveys at the completion of the Quest courses and an Essential Learning Outcomes Reflection as part of the Connect course. The Office of Institutional Research will summarize the results of these assessments and prepare a report. Results of the University Studies Program indirect assessments are a part of the Oshkosh Student Achievement Report (OSAR) which is published on an annual basis. The Office of Institutional Research administers and analyzes results of the national surveys related to student satisfaction with campus experiences focusing on civic engagement, leadership development opportunities and the development of personal and social responsibility. All survey results will be a part of the OSAR report.

USP Program Component

Outcomes

Cycle/Target/Population

Quest I Survey

USP Program Outcomes: First Year

Annual/Students (after Quest I); Peer Mentors; and Instructors

Quest II Survey

USP Program Outcomes: First Year

Annual/Students (end of Quest II) and Instructors

Quest III Survey

USP Program Outcomes: Second Year

Annual/Students (at the end of their Quest III courses); Instructors; Alumni Mentors; and Community Partners

Connect Reflection

USP Program Outcome #12

Annual (at the end of their Connect course)

 

 

VII.        Assessment of Undergraduate and Graduate Programs

All academic programs are required to develop, implement, and evaluate assessment plans to assess learning outcomes in their programs. It is the responsibility of the academic program to ensure implementation of their assessment plan. Programs submit assessment reports to a committee of the Faculty Senate every two years. The University Faculty Senate Committee for the Assessment of Student Learning collects and periodically reviews these individual assessment plans, offering support to the individual departments, college, and programs in their ongoing assessment plan development and implementation. The Assistant Vice Chancellor for Curricular Affairs and Student Academic Achievement will summarize the committee feedback and share the feedback with the chairperson of the program. The Assessment Plans are on file in the Provost and Vice Chancellor’s Office. Assessment of academic programs is described in the UW Oshkosh Faculty Handbook as follows: “Academic program assessment will occur every two years. The biennial program assessment report will have five sections: 1) program goals and intended student learning outcomes; 2) assessment methods/tools appropriate for learning outcomes; 3) analysis of results feedback mechanisms; 4) interpretation of assessment results; and 5) assessment results used to inform change or improvement. These reports are to be summarized and included in the evaluation portion of the program review self-study document”.

      A. Evaluation Criteria for Program Assessment Plans:

Assessment plans must meet the following expectations to be considered “well established”:

    1. Program goals and intended student learning outcomes are developed and reflect the uniqueness of the program.
    2. Systematic assessment of student learning uses using multiple qualitative and quantitative measures, and reflects the uniqueness of the academic program and discipline.
    3. Assessment data is gathered from more than 3 direct measures and feedback is gathered from all key stakeholders (current students, faculty, alumni, employers of graduates, graduate schools, etc.).
    4. Evidence of a formal and effective feedback and improvement mechanism which includes: a: review process, engagement with all key stakeholders, and demonstration the feedback has been used to improve curriculum, instruction and learning.
    5. Assessment plan is efficient and demonstrates an ease of administration in all aspects.

 

VIII.     University-wide Assessment

In addition to reviewing program assessment plans, the Faculty Senate Committee for the Assessment of Student Learning monitors results of the broader assessment tools used at the University, and regularly evaluates these tools for effectiveness in measuring student learning and development. A table of the assessment tools used for university-wide assessment is included below, along with details for the administration of each assessment. Assessment results are published and reported by the Office of Institutional Research.

A. Description and Administration of University-wide Assessments

  1. Direct University-wide Assessments

Assessment

Focus

Cycle/Target Population

Collegiate Learning Assessment

Written Communication; Critical Thinking; Problem Solving

Alternate years

Freshman/Seniors

Oshkosh Student Achievement Report

Retention rates; graduation rates; First Year GPA; Freshman Profile; Participation in High Impact Practices; Learning Assistance Participation; Transfer Student Participation; Early Alert and Academic Support with Performance; Results of the USP assessments for Quest I, II, III; Explore, Connect

Every year/all students

  • Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) provides data about student achievement of three learning outcomes: written communication; critical thinking; and problem solving. Results from the CLA are nationally normed and include a value-added measure. The CLA serves as a national benchmark for the evaluation of the University Studies Program as well as other local measures. The CLA results are part of the Voluntary System of Accountability (VSA) report.
  • The Oshkosh Student Achievement Report (OSAR) is a report of the results of several campus initiatives related to retention and either UW System or AAC&U initiatives and the University Studies Program. The Office of Institutional Research prepares the report and analysis in collaboration with the University Studies Program and the Faculty Senate Committee for the Assessment of Student Learning.

 2. Indirect University-wide Assessments:

Assessment

Focus

Cycle/Target Population

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)

Engagement; general learning experiences; interaction

 

Every three  years /Freshman/Seniors

Oshkosh Survey of Student Engagement (OSSE)

Engagement; general learning experiences; interaction

Annual except for NSSE administration years/ all students

Graduating Senior Survey

 

Career plans; general satisfaction

Every semester/Seniors

Civic Engagement Survey

Civic Knowledge and Engagement

Alternate years/All students

Leadership Survey

 

Leadership Skills

Alternate years/All students

Personal/Social Responsibility Survey

Signature Questions

Every three years/All students

    • National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) is a norm -referenced survey that examines the student experience of freshman and senior students in five areas: Level of academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, student-faculty interaction, enriching educational experiences, and supportive campus environment.
    • OSSE: The University created its own survey, the Oshkosh Survey of Student Engagement to administer in the years when we are not participating in the UW System NSSE survey. Results are collected, analyzed and reported through the Office of Institutional Research and the Office of the Provost. Data are shared with student, faculty and staff groups for planning purposes.
    • Graduating Senior Survey: Each semester graduating seniors participate in a survey related to career prospects, satisfaction with the UW Oshkosh experience and other selected campus inquiry questions. The survey is administered to all seniors after graduation ceremonies. Career Services consults with the Office of Institutional Research to design and report these data.
    • Civic Engagement Survey: This survey is administered in collaboration with the Division of Student Affairs. The survey focuses on student participation in campus and community activities as well as self-efficacy concepts.
    • Leadership Survey: This survey is administered in collaboration with the Division of Student Affairs. The survey focuses on key leadership skills, abilities and perceptions of students.
    • Personal and Social Responsibility Survey: A norm referenced survey focusing on learning experiences and outcomes related to learning outcomes.

 

IX         Reporting: University-wide Assessment

        A.   Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA)

CLA data are scored and reported by the CLA organization. The Office of Institutional Research will issue a campus level report. The report will be shared by the Office of Institutional Research and the Office of the Provost. Members of the Faculty Senate Committee on the Assessment of Student Learning (FSCASL) review and comment on the analysis. Results are distributed through an Executive Summary for the Deans for discussion and use at the College and program levels. This assessment is administered and reported on a three year cycle.

 

        B.   Oshkosh Student Achievement Report (OSAR):

The reporting of University-wide and University Studies Program assessments will be documented in the Oshkosh Student Achievement Report. The report will be published by the Office of Institutional Research on an annual basis and will consist of two major categories, university wide assessment and the status of student learning on the essential learning outcomes (as assessed in the University Studies Program). The Office of Institutional Research in collaboration with the University Studies Program Committee and the Faculty Senate Committee on the Assessment of Student Learning will review survey results and other assessment data about student learning outcomes. Faculty teams will analyze artifacts from the Connect course in collaboration with the USP Committee and the Faculty Senate Committee on the Assessment of Student Learning. Results are reported in the Oshkosh Student Achievement Report and shared with the colleges and faculty. The report will be shared with major governance groups, the faculty members and academic staff as well as the academic learning support centers. The report will be used as a planning document for academic and programmatic decision-making. Components of the report are listed below.

    • Retention Rates by Race/Ethnicity – disaggregated data reporting retention rates across specific populations
    • Graduation Rates by Race/Ethnicity – disaggregated data reporting graduation rates across specific populations
    • DFW Summary Data – list of gateway courses and the percentage of D, F, or W grades
    • Freshman Profile – demographics of freshmen including ACT scores, HS rank, ethnicity
    • FYE GPA – mean GPA’s of first-year students often disaggregated by race/ethnicity
    • HIP Participation – percentage of student population who are participating in various high impact practices
    • Transfer Student Success – GPA and retention of transfer students
    • Learning Assistance Participation – percentage and number of students using academic learning resource support
    • Early Alert – number of students who receive an Early Alert, percentage of students who use academic support, GPA of students who received an Early Alert as they complete the course
    • University Studies Program report: Quest I, II, III by learning outcomes and signature question. Connect data are reported by learning outcome.


C.   National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)

The Office of Institutional Research will prepare an executive summary of the results of the NSSE survey. The report will be distributed to the Colleges and the Provost Administrative Staff and the Office of Student Affairs for sharing with faculty and staff. These reports are also reported as a part of the Institutional Accountability Report and the Voluntary System of Accountability Report.

D.   Oshkosh Survey of Student Engagement (OSSE)

The Office of Institutional Research will prepare an executive summary of the results of the OSSE survey. The report will be distributed to the Colleges and the Provost Administrative Staff and the Office of Student Affairs for sharing with faculty and staff.

X.   Summary: Review of Assessment Plan

The Faculty Senate Committee on the Assessment of Student Learning, the USP Committee and the Office of Institutional Research will review the UW Oshkosh Overall Assessment Plan on a three-year cycle. Updates, editions, or other changes to the plan will be reported to governance and the Office of the Provost on an annual basis. The plan will be reviewed for the following criteria: a) currency; b) identification of appropriate assessment tools and practices; c) efficacy to produce meaningful data; d) efficiency of use and implementation; e) alignment with accreditation standards; and d) alignment to the mission and learning outcomes of the University.

 XII. Appendix

Expectations for the Biennial Program Assessment Report (approved by the Faculty Senate on November 30, 2010)

 A. Section One: Program Goals and Intended Student Learning Outcomes

What are the programs’ learning outcomes?

    • All programs have full autonomy in selecting their own learning outcomes and selection of assessments.
    • These outcomes can be aligned with college, university, or a professional organization’s stated outcomes.
    • The learning outcomes should reflect the entire program’s mission.
    • Learning outcomes should be specific enough to be measurable: “Students should be able to … analyze, apply, evaluate, synthesize.]”

 

 B. Section Two: Assessment Methods/Tools Appropriate for Learning Outcome

What are the various methods used in assessing program outcomes? Identify the milestone assessment points throughout the program, including entrance into the program, midpoint, internship or field experiences, capstone or end of program. Be sure to include assessment of follow-up surveys after graduation. Multiple methods of assessment are recommended. All programs are responsible for the selection of assessment formats. Possible sources of assessment include:

                  i.        Direct Assessment: Assessments at the course level:

          • Whenever possible use course assessments that address a few program learning outcomes. 
          • Collect assessments from the defined milestone points in the program and assess how student work meets the program’s learning goals.
          • It is up to the program to decide the sampling size of these large-scale assessments.
          • Look for strengths and weaknesses based on program outcomes.
          • Analyze with well-defined qualitative or quantitative measurements.

                ii.         Direct Assessment: Other possible tools:

          • Pre- and Post Tests can show how much students learned over time, but a single measure late in the academic career may be sufficient.
          • Portfolios of student work require a lot of time from students and evaluators. They are useful in demonstrating development over time. (An evaluation rubric should be developed before files are collected.)
          • National exams may be used if they align with the program’s outcomes and if the results are diagnostic (reveal strengths and weaknesses of the curriculum).


                 iii.        Indirect Assessment Survey: Alumni surveys, focus groups, employers’ surveys

          • Questions could be: How well were the learning goals achieved? What parts of the program were most useful in achieving the goals? What parts of the program could be changed to better achieve the goals?

 

Section Two: Table to Align Program Outcomes and Assessment Methods

Program Outcomes

Course/Program Component

Assessment Format

 

 

 

 

 

 

 C. Section Three: Analysis of Results Feedback Mechanisms

How will data from the assessments be collected, stored, and shared? How will the results for each assessment be analyzed? Describe the process that the program is planning to use for the analysis. How will feedback be shared with the program faculty

 D. Section Four: Interpretation of Assessment Result

What process will be used for the interpretation of assessment results? An annual department meeting to share and discuss the results is recommended. Programs are not required to evaluate every learning outcome on a yearly basis—programs may develop a cycle where outcomes are studied on a periodic, but regular, basis. During those meetings:

  • Instructors present the evidence of student learning from chosen classes.

The department should decide on actions that will improve student learning and/or improve the assessment process. Guide questions for the analysis include:
                   i.        What are the program’s strengths? In what ways is the program clearly succeeding in meeting its goals?
                   ii.        What are areas for improvement based on the analysis of results? Look at each program outcome to do this analysis.
                   iii.       What has been learned about the link between the learning outcomes of individual courses and the outcomes of the program overall?                                        How are course sequences, including prerequisites, used to build and reinforce student competencies?
                   iv.       What has been learned about how graduates of the program apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the program?
                   v.        What has been learned about the effectiveness of the general education program as it relates to student learning for your program?

 

Table of Assessment Results and Possible Change

Assessment Method/ context of assessment

Results

Interpretation

Program improvement or change planned

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 E. Section Five: Assessment Results Used to Inform Change or Improvement

  • How was the assessment data used to make changes in your curriculum?
  • How will the effectiveness of any changes made be tracked and reported?

 

 

 

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