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We've moved! 

Please visit us at our new location, Lincoln Hall, on the corner of Algoma Blvd. and Wisconsin St. Mail can still be directed to the address listed above. 

 

LCE Institute 2015 Agenda

View the agenda for the LCE Institute. Breakout sessions offer a variety of topics and perspectives, allowing Institute attendees to customize their experience. 

Please note: Sessions and presenters are subject to change.

8–8:45 a.m. Registration and continental breakfast

8:45–9 a.m. Opening Remarks

Don Hones and Kathy Henn-Reinke

9–9:45 a.m. Keynote

Collaboration and Co-teaching: What Every Educator Needs to Know—Andrea Honigsfeld, Molloy College

One of the 21st century competencies proclaimed by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills is collaboration. This presentation will take a broad-based look at what effective teacher collaboration looks like, what essential frameworks need to be established for ESL and general education teachers to work together, and how integrated approaches to ESL services benefit all stakeholders.

10–10:50 a.m. Breakout Session I

A. Seven Co-teaching Models: Effective Implementation Strategies—Andrea Honigsfeld, Molloy College

The purpose of this workshop is to review, evaluate and adapt seven co-teaching models for the sake of ELLs in K-12 instructional settings. Participants will:

  • Determine how specific co-teaching practices can respond to the needs of diverse English learners and enhance collaboration between co-teachers 
  • Identify, describe and evaluate seven co-teaching models
  • View and analyze video clips of co-teaching in authentic and realistic situations
  • Compare the advantages and challenges of each of the seven arrangements in the ESL context

B. Creating a Working Relationship Between Strategists and Content Teachers—Justin Hable, Patrick Lawton, Stacey Thiede, and Sarah Warren; Oshkosh Area School District

This session will examine how to create a co-teaching relationship between
strategists and content area teachers in order to meet the needs of diverse learners in class. Presenters will discuss techniques used in their classrooms to build effective partnerships between multiple teachers within the same classroom. Presenters will also discuss strategies used in class to meet all needs of learners placed within a single classroom. This session is intended for an audience of K-12 general education teachers, K-12 ELL teachers, K-12 special education teachers, administrators, and teacher candidates. 

C. From Language Learners to Bilingual Teachers: Reflections of Newcomer Students in American Schools—Alessandra Mendez Markowski, Marco Olson-Guillen and Lilian Santos Wenzel; Green Bay Area School District

Alessandra, Marco and Lilian each arrived in the United States and entered American schools without the ability to speak English. At that time, ELL programs were not implemented in schools as they are now. Their experiences have given them the ability to closely relate to and empathize with the challenges that so many ELLs experience on a daily basis in a way that many other educators cannot. As professionals, they are able to reflect on their experiences, feelings and emotions from adolescence through
adulthood to aid them as they work with and teach their students.

D. Indigenous Language and Culture as a Preventative Measure for Community Violence—Toni House, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

This presentation will share the educational principles of peace imbedded in the Indigenous Culture of the Haudenosaunee (People of the Longhouse) in an attempt to combat community violence. These principles address violence prevention for the individual, family, community, and nation. The primary objective would be to create awareness of these ancient principles of peace.

E. SIOP in ESL and Bilingual Classrooms—Corri Gossen, Green Bay School District; Hannah Kestley, Maggie Lottes, Emily McGrath, Amber Miner, and Rebecca Liming, St. Norbert College; Asako, Kamada, and Risa Ikeno, Nihon University; Yoko Mogi-Hein, UW Oshkosh 

Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) is a research-based instructional framework that provides content and academic language to ELLs in pre-K-12 grade level classes. Based on SIOP guiding questions, this collaborative group project examined how teachers can develop content and language objectives, emphasize key vocabulary, promote interaction, and incorporate effective review and assessment techniques within the context of ESL classrooms.

11–11:50 a.m. Breakout Session II

F. Co-planning and Co-assessing: Key to Successful Co-teaching Practice—Andrea Honigsfeld, Molloy College

While co-teaching itself receives substantial attention, teachers need time and
structured opportunities for the other three components of the collaborative
instructional cycle

  1. Co-planning differentiated units and lessons
  2. Engaging in co-assessment practices
  3. Reflecting on the teaching-learning process that took place in the class. 

In this workshop, participants will:

  • Learn about co-planning routines, templates and best practices for differentiating lessons for ELLs
  • Examine collaborative assessment tools and protocols and their impact on
  • student learning
  • Participate in reflection simulations to practice self-assessment and
  • partnership building

G. Games for English Learners—Stacie Mueller, Manitowoc Public School District; and Kristen Bustrak, Green Bay Area Public Schools

In this session participants will learn about a variety of language games that help build vocabulary, listening skills and oral fluency. Be ready for some active learning!

H. “Hands up, Don’t Shoot!” and “I Can’t Breathe”: Using Poetry to Document American Regenerative Racism—Alfred Kisubi, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh 

This will be a poetry session to show how one can document and challenge the regenerative racism in America through poetry.

I. A Wisconsin Seal of Biliteracy: One District’s Journey—Tolu Sanabria, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

The DPI Bilingual-Bicultural Program is working with district staff to develop a Wisconsin Seal of Biliteracy. This seal will be different from similar programs in other states in that there will be added rigor. One district, the Madison Metropolitan School District (MMSD), has developed a district seal that recently obtained board approval. The presentation will consist of a brief review of the group’s work, followed by an in-depth look at the steps taken by MMSD staff to bring their proposal to their board for approval.

Noon–12:45 p.m. Lunch

12:45–1:15 p.m. Performance: UW Oshkosh Taiko Drums

1:30–2:20 p.m. Breakout Session III

J. Seven Co-teaching Models: Effective Implementation Strategies—Andrea Honigsfeld, Molloy College

The purpose of this workshop is to review, evaluate and adapt seven co-teaching models for the sake of ELLs in K-12 instructional settings. Participants will:

  • Determine how specific co-teaching practices can respond to the needs of diverse English learners and enhance collaboration between co-teachers
  • Identify, describe and evaluate seven co-teaching models
  • View and analyze video clips of co-teaching in authentic and realistic situations
  • Compare the advantages and challenges of each of the seven arrangements in the ESL context

K. Incorporating elements of African oral tradition into the teaching of English—Alfred Kisubi, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

This workshop will illustrate how to research and incorporate elements of traditional oral arts into the English literature curriculum.

L. Hmong Values—Snyu Yang, Hmong Globe Newspaper, Appleton, Wis.

It has been more than 40 years since Hmong immigrants first began arriving in the United States. In their expedition of living in America, they face many obstacles. One of these obstacles is the difficulty of passing on the importance of many Hmong values from one generation to the next. This session focuses on the loss of some of these values by the Hmong community, and it hopes to explore situations surrounding why these values are not carried on by Hmong youths.

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