Information Literacy

Contained on the first page is an information literacy definition, skills, and importance. Subpages contain information related to library instruction and research services.

Information literacy: definition

Information literacy is "the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning". The 21st century student in higher education lives in a dynamic and often uncertain information ecosystem: the ability to effectively understand and navigate this environment is critical to their success.

 

What skills are associated with information literacy?

The Association of College and Research Libraries' (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education has organized six concepts (frames) central to information literacy, each with its own set of knowledge practices and dispositions which describe ways that address the affective, attitudinal, or valuing dimensions of learning. The six concepts that anchor the frames, presented alphabetically, are:

  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Scholarship as Conversation
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration

Why is it important to be information literate?

To be information literate is to be an informed citizen in a democratic society. To become informed, however, requires an individual to have the ability to sift through the overwhelming amount of information produced by our society each day: from the 24/7 news cycle on the radio, television, Internet, and other media formats to the ever-expanding scholarly disciplines and sub-disciplines. Information literacy allows a person to not only search for and find information relevant to their personal, professional, and civic lives: it also allows them to critically evaluate information for accuracy and bias, and to understand and effectively apply that information.

Like any advanced skill, information literacy is a skill which takes time to develop, and will not occur immediately. A great deal of time, practice, and support must be invested to make the transition. UW Oshkosh Libraries play an important role in making this transition; please see the links to the right to discover how we can help your students.

For more information on information literacy and standards for higher education, please visit the Association of College and Research Libraries' website on information literacy.

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"Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education," American Library Association, January 11, 2016.

Information literacy: Definition

Information literacy is an individual's ability to effectively find, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information. Such abilities are central to the success of the 21st century higher education student, since the qualities attained through information literacy directly influence the fostering of critical thinking skills and lifelong learning.

 

What skills are associated with information literacy?

The Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education is organized into six frames, each consisting of a concept central to information literacy, a set of knowledge practices, and a set of dispositions. The six concepts that anchor the frames are presented alphabetically:

  • Authority Is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Scholarship as Conversation
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration

 

Why is it important to be information literate?

To be information literate is to be an informed citizen in a democratic society. To become informed, however, requires an individual to have the ability to sift through the overwhelming

amount of information produced by our society each day: from the 24/7 news cycle on the radio, television, Internet, and other media formats to the ever-expanding scholarly disciplines and sub-disciplines. Information literacy allows a person to not only search for and find information relevant to their personal, professional, and civic lives: it also allows them to critically evaluate information for accuracy and bias, and to understand and effectively apply that information.

Like any advanced skill, information literacy is a skill which takes time to develop, and will not occur immediately. A great deal of time, practice, and support must be invested to make the transition. UW Oshkosh Libraries play an important role in making this transition; please see the links to the right to discover how we can help your students.

For more information on information literacy for higher education, please visit the Association of College and Research Libraries’ website on Information Literacy.

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"Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education," American Library Association, January 11, 2016.

Information literacy: Definition

Information literacy is an individual's ability to effectively find, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information. Such abilities are central to the success of the 21st century higher education student, since the qualities attained through information literacy directly influence the fostering of critical thinking skills and lifelong learning.

 

What skills are associated with information literacy?

The Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education is organized into six frames, each consisting of a concept central to information literacy, a set of knowledge practices, and a set of dispositions. The six concepts that anchor the frames are presented alphabetically:

  • Authority Is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Scholarship as Conversation
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration

 

Why is it important to be information literate?

To be information literate is to be an informed citizen in a democratic society. To become informed, however, requires an individual to have the ability to sift through the overwhelming

amount of information produced by our society each day: from the 24/7 news cycle on the radio, television, Internet, and other media formats to the ever-expanding scholarly disciplines and sub-disciplines. Information literacy allows a person to not only search for and find information relevant to their personal, professional, and civic lives: it also allows them to critically evaluate information for accuracy and bias, and to understand and effectively apply that information.

Like any advanced skill, information literacy is a skill which takes time to develop, and will not occur immediately. A great deal of time, practice, and support must be invested to make the transition. UW Oshkosh Libraries play an important role in making this transition; please see the links to the right to discover how we can help your students.

For more information on information literacy for higher education, please visit the Association of College and Research Libraries’ website on Information Literacy.

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"Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education," American Library Association, January 11, 2016.