Publishing Opportunities

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Ongoing Book Series

Edited Collections [3 NEW]

Themed Journal Issues [5 NEW]

Ongoing Book Series


Film and History (Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group)

Cynthia J. Miller, series editor

The "Film and History" Series is currently accepting proposals for volumes focused on the ways in which film uniquely reflects and shapes our knowledge of our social and historical worlds. Film is, inescapably, both an artifact and agent of history – a product of the historical moment from which it is created, released, and consumed, a chronicle of lives and times, and a tool of social and historical learning – and as such, mediates our understanding of social and historical themes, genre patterns, and critical events. [Full CFP]

 

National Cinema Reference Book Series (Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group)
Cynthia J. Miller, series editor

The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is seeking authors for new scholarly reference books on a wide range of national cinemas, to be published as part of its rapidly growing “Film and History” book series. Proposals for volumes focused on national cinemas, such as The Encyclopedia of Hong Kong Film, are welcome, as are proposals for particular facets of a nation’s cinema, such as The Encyclopedia of Hong Kong Horror Films. [Full CFP]

 

Outlaws in Literature, History, and Culture (Ashgate Publishing)
Lesley Coote and Alexander Kaufman, series editors

This series seeks to reflect the transcultural, transgendered and interdisciplinary manifestations, and the different literary, political, socio-historical, and media contexts in which the outlaw/ed may be encountered from the medieval period to the modern. [Full CFP]

Science Fiction Television (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers)
A. Bowdoin Van Riper, series editor

The Rowman & Littlefield series “Science Fiction Television” is seeking proposals for books (including reference books) that take a rigorous, scholarly approach to the subject without sacrificing clarity and readability. Volumes that trace themes, subjects, and careers across multiple series and multiple decades; that explore hitherto neglected productions; and that deal with science fiction television outside the United States are particularly welcome. [General CFP][Reference Book CFP]

Edited Collections

Python Beyond Python: Critical Essays on the Work of Monty Python Members Before and After Their Participation in the Comedy
Lynn Whitfield
Abstracts due 1 December 2014; finished essays 1 March 2015

The editors seek well-written and well-researched articles that address texts and performances that fall into the category of Python Beyond Python. While the editors are interested in analysis of the recent 2014 reunion (as live and streamed performance), they will not consider papers related to Monty Python’s Flying Circus or movies like Meaning of Life, Life of Brian, Holy Grail, And Now for Something Completely Different etc. Some texts and topics to consider include (but are not limited to):
non-Python collaborations, fiction writing, non-fiction writing, non-fiction work for television, Illustrated books for children, work in theatre, audio works, graphic novels, non-Python film acting (e.g. John Cleese as "Q" in the James Bond films), etc. [More]

 

NEW Marvel Cinematic Universe - Phase 1
Kristin M. Barton
Abstracts due by 15 December 2014; Essays by 15 May 2015

As one of the biggest and most successful film franchises of all time, Marvel’s approach to developing an interconnected film universe has seemingly revolutionized the way superhero films are being made. Creating a shared universe with elements that crossover and interconnect individual films (culminating in perhaps the ultimate “team-up” film, The Avengers), this approach to filmmaking changed the way characters and storylines are developed. Marvel’s foresight has resulted in a long-term plan for the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), which at this point consists of three distinct phases, each of which is to conclude with an Avengers film Tthis proposed collection will look at Phase 1 of the MCU, which is comprised of the following films:

Iron Man (2008)
The Incredible Hulk (2008)
Iron Man 2 (2010)
Thor (2011)
Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)
The Avengers (2012)

Please note: the chapters contained in the collection will focus exclusively on events in Phase 1 of the MCU, so discussion of development or events from subsequent films should be avoided. Submissions with detailed outlines or in draft form will be given stronger consideration. Brief queries are welcome should there be questions about appropriate submission topics. [More]

 

Plant Horror: The Monstrous Vegetal
Dawn Keetley and Rita Kurtz
Abstracts due 2 January 2015; finished essays Summer 2015

Perhaps because of their irreducible difference from us, their intractable unfamiliarity, plants have often entered popular narratives as terrifying and terrorizing forces. They seem monstrous in their implacability and impersonality, their rooted unfreedom, their unintentionality, and their prolific and non-teleological “wild” growth. With the goal of exploring how and why plants have figured as terrifying in so many of our cultural narratives, we invite proposals for the first collection of essays on “plant horror”—that is, on how plants and all forms of vegetal life have figured as the monstrous in literature, film, television, and other media (video games, comics).

We are interested in essays that address the “canon” of plant horror (e.g. Day of the Triffids, Little Shop of Horrors, Swamp Thing, The Happening), but essays that serve to expand this “canon” are very welcome. We are also eager to receive abstracts that address how vegetal life features in unexpected ways and on the margins of narratives not explicitly about the depredations of plants (e.g. Doctor Who: The Seeds of Doom, Batman and Robin (1997), and Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets). [More]

 

NEW The Gothic and Racism
Universitas Press
Abstracts due 31 December 2014; finished essays 15 March 2015

This edited volume will explore issues of race in all artistic manifestations of the Gothic. The aim of the collection is to analyse forms of racism and racialism put forward by Gothic cultural productions over the last 250 years. We are looking for essays on the many and subtle links between Gothic and racism to be published in a volume in 2015. We encourage scholars from around the world to submit papers that look at classical or contemporary Gothic fiction and film in any and all countries and discuss race in these works. One particular approach that would unify the essays is postcolonialism. That said, readings that pursue a different approach but discuss race in a work and its political, cultural, or social implications are equally welcome. [More]

 

NEW The Loki Collection
Grainne O'Brien
Abstracts due 1 May 2015

Since the release of Marvel’s Thor along with its sequel and the Avengers Assemble movies, there has been a renewed interest in Loki, the Trickster God.Tom Hiddleston’s depiction of this legendary character has seen Loki become an international household name. But how much is Marvel responsible (if at all) for Loki’s now mainstream status? This collection will examine any and all representations of Loki from his appearance in Norse Mythology, up to his appearance in comics, films, TV series, and novels today.It will consider submissions from any academic field. It will be a completely interdisciplinary work, with no limitations on what medium the contributors wish to use when examining this layered and interesting character. Inspiration for analysis of Loki’s representation can be found in film, TV, literature, comic book art, drama, fan fiction and music. The aim of this collection is to demonstrate how popular Loki has become, and the different ways his representation in popular culture can be interpreted. [More]

 

NEW "It's Happening Again:" Twenty-Five Years of Twin Peaks
Eric Hoffman and Dominick Grace
Abstracts due 30 April 2015

Eric Hoffman and Dominick Grace solicit essays for a new collection celebrating one of television's greatest cult phenomena. Originally airing in 1990/91, Mark Frost and David Lynch'sTwin Peaks will be returning, twenty-five years after it went off the air, and this collection will explore the show in the context of its time, and its legacy. We are interested in papers on all aspects of the television program as well as on tie-ins and connected materials (e.g. the film Fire Walk with Me, the new Log Lady material added for the show's run on Bravo, the book The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer, etc.) [More]

 

NEW Marvel Cinematic Universe - Phase 1
Kristin M. Barton
Abstracts due by 15 December 2014; Essays by 15 May 2015

As one of the biggest and most successful film franchises of all time, Marvel’s approach to developing an interconnected film universe has seemingly revolutionized the way superhero films are being made. Creating a shared universe with elements that crossover and interconnect individual films (culminating in perhaps the ultimate “team-up” film, The Avengers), this approach to filmmaking changed the way characters and storylines are developed. Marvel’s foresight has resulted in a long-term plan for the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), which at this point consists of three distinct phases, each of which is to conclude with an Avengers film Tthis proposed collection will look at Phase 1 of the MCU, which is comprised of the following films:

Iron Man (2008)
The Incredible Hulk (2008)
Iron Man 2 (2010)
Thor (2011)
Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)
The Avengers (2012)

Please note: the chapters contained in the collection will focus exclusively on events in Phase 1 of the MCU, so discussion of development or events from subsequent films should be avoided. Submissions with detailed outlines or in draft form will be given stronger consideration. Brief queries are welcome should there be questions about appropriate submission topics. [More]

.

Themed Journal Issues

NEW Misfits: Children with a Twist
Red Feather: An International Journal of Children’s Popular Culture
Abstracts due 31 December 2014

Children fall under the binary of child-like nymph and childish imp. Yet what does it feel like to inhabit and to perform within this binary? Given that, following Kathryn Bond Stockton, that the default image of childhood, innocence, must feel stranger to the child who inhabits it than to the adult who projects it, aren’t we then rather left with nothing but misfits? How is the odd, weird, and strange being lived, negotiated, and questioned when it comes to children and childhood? What are its affects and effects? What function does adulthood play in this? What are the socio-cultural machines that give birth to misfits, and why? What mechanisms do misfits invent in order to thrive? Could we contend that the bogeyman is an odd and strange creature that haunts the adult more than the child? This CFP seeks essays that explore “misfits” in relation to child and adult studies. [More]

 

NEW Horror Classics
Journal of Dracula Studies
Complete essays due by 1 January 2015

In 2015 we will be publishing a special edition of the Journal of Dracula Studies to mark the 20th anniversary of our Chapter. The theme of this edition will be The Horror Classics. We invite manuscripts of scholarly, reader-friendly, articles of 3000 words or less for The Horror Classics. We are looking for articles which explore the classic horror monsters of literature, film, comics from the Golden Age of horror (Tales From the Crypt etc), and TV: The Mummy, Ghosts, The Witch, Mad Scientists, Swamp Monsters, Zombies, The Haunted House, The Werewolf, Aliens, Edward Gory etc. (For this special edition, we are not publishing material on the Vampire). Material is not limited to any historical era. We require that articles be free of jargon and over-dependence on literary criticism. [More]

 

NEW Women's Labor in Film and Media
The Projector: A Journal on Film, Media, and Culture
Complete essays due 31 January 2015

The Projector: A Journal on Film, Media, and Culture is developing a special (potentially double) issue on women’s labor in film, television, gaming, and other media forms. We are interested in research that contributes to the growing body of work on women’s creative labor in the various aspects of film, television, and (new) media production, distribution, and exhibition. The special issue aims to feature research in production studies that sheds light on the gendered dimensions of labor in screen industries, and on women’s ongoing and shifting contributions to film, television, and media practice above and/or below the line. We are interested in research that illuminates women’s participation in film/media industries in different time periods, production venues, and delivery-system formats, as well as research that illuminates women’s labor in relation to cultural context, genre (status), or intersections between gender, race, sexuality, region, and so on The special issue(s) could also be a site for contributions in other forms, including: a forum of coordinated short essays, book reviews of pertinent material, interviews with practitioners, etc. [More]

 

NEW Time
MEDIASCAPE Journal of Film and Media Studies
31 January 2015

MEDIASCAPE, UCLA's open-access peer reviewed journal for film, television, and digital media, is now accepting submissions for its next issue. This next issue considers the theme of Time in Cinema, Media and Visual Culture. MEDIASCAPE is proud to publish high quality work that combines the cutting edge of critical and historical analysis with an impulse to explore the possibilities of digital publishing. We are eager to work closely with authors to publish high-quality work that embeds audio-visual content, video essays, and/or interactive applications. Our journal also publishes traditional scholarly essays, but we encourage all authors to consider graphic and video aids.

Perhaps the property most unique to cinema and media is inclusion of time as a defining element. What is a film if not time applied to a photograph? It is this specific attribute that differentiates cinema and media from the other visual arts and from which all other methods and techniques derive. Only in these arts and only through their use of time is time travel possible. We all know time as a constant stream but through editing and non-linear storytelling that stream can be diverted, redirected, and dammed up altogether. This year alone has featured a number of notable films that played heavily with their relationship to time: "The Grand Budapest Hotel," "Get on Up," "Gone Girl," "The Imitation Game," "Interstellar," "Wild," "Boyhood," "Edge of Tomorrow," "X-Men: Days of Future Past" to name a few. Nonlinearity may be less common in videogames, but as the two mediums converge several games have begun to play with these storytelling methods: "Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception," "Bioshock Infinite," "Assassin’s Creed," "The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time." While this divergence from strict linear narrative storytelling is nothing new, it is worth considering how cinema and media’s use of time structurally, narratively, as a plot mechanic operates both in its effectiveness and functionality.

Brief descriptions of the journal's three sections -- which have different editors and different length and submission requirements -- follow. Please click the "More" link for a given section for full details.

The "Review" section asks contributors to examine these aspects of time creatively and to apply them to their critical pieces. Reviews should focus on media where time is utilized in a specific way or should focus on how time has affected the subject itself, as queried earlier. Further interpretation is allowed and encouraged. Submissions should be between 1200 and 4500 words. [More]

The "Columns" section welcomes submissions of approximately 800-3,500 words (5-15 pages) that explore time in its different forms and the roles it plays in film, television, and digital media - and to also take into account the role it plays for the audience. [More]

The "META" section is looking for essays and/or video essays exploring the ideas of new media’s relationship to time. The topics may include but are not limited to explorations regarding time in cinema, digital media, video games, streaming web based formats (serialized TV-like episodes) media marketing trends, binge watching/gaming, and seriality that expand beyond previous media limited by time; or limited to access because of time. The META section strives to use digital media in its presentation. Submissions should be between 1000 and 5000 words, and must include a short video accompaniment: Either a video essay created by the user or one already available on the Internet to exemplify the issues discussed. [More]


NEW Contemporary Film and Public Life
Ethos: A Digital Review of Arts, Humanities, and Public Ethics
Complete essays due 15 May 2015

Ethos—a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary online journal and digital forum based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill—invites submissions for its April 2015 issue, entitled “Contemporary Film and Public Life.” For this issue of Ethos, we invite submissions of original scholarly work that consider recent films (roughly defined in terms of the past twenty years) and the weight they bring to bear on our contemporary public life. What patterns and preoccupations characterize the current generation of films? How do certain popular genres of film (the Western, the romantic comedy, etc.) differ from their predecessors? How may the idea of genre itself be altered in contemporary film? What are the politics underlying the institutions (such as festivals and academic departments) supporting film studies? Where in public life do films surface, and how do they seem to inform public discourse? This issue will also consider studies of foreign-language films, although the essays themselves must be written in English and must translate quotations from the films. Furthermore, we invite essays that make interventions in recent film theory. Ethos publishes articles written for a wider intellectual audience, so authors are encouraged to avoid—or, in the least, explain—technical jargon whenever possible. [More]


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