Baron Perlman & Lee I. McCann

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Main page Psy Curricular Research Teaching Research Teaching Tips Book: Lessons Learned Book: Recruiting Faculty Book Chapters Dr. Perlman's VitaDr. McCann's Vita Psychology Index

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Concerns About "Teaching" at Professional Conferences
Baron Perlman and Lee I. McCann (2002). Poster. National Institute on the Teaching of Psychology.

Faculty, as "students," at professional meetings, expect high quality "teaching." We obtained their peeves about the "teaching" they received at conferences and found concerns across the teaching spectrum. These concerns can serve as guidelines for presenters to improve the quality of their presentations and pedagogy.

Concerns About "Teaching" at Professional Conferences
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Student Perspectives on Grade Changes from Test to Test
Baron Perlman and Lee I. McCann (2002). Teaching of Psychology, 29, 51-53

 We surveyed undergraduate psychology students whose exam grades had gone up or down a minimum of one full letter grade from one exam to the next. We asked about their perceptions of how their studying and preparation differed for each exam. These data may be useful for students and assist faculty in advising about better exam preparation and performance.

Student Perspectives on Grade Changes from Test to Test
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Instructor Evaluations of Introductory Psychology Teaching Techniques
Lee I. McCann, Baron Perlman, and Tanya L. De Both. (2001) Teaching of Psychology, 28, 274-276

We asked experienced introductory psychology instructors to rate the perceived effectiveness of 22 teaching techniques to improve student performance. These teachers rated more in-class examples and activities, writing assignments, emphasizing core concepts in lectures and exams, and providing copies of lecture outlines as most effective. There was no significant correlation between a method's frequency of use and its perceived effect on student learning. Instructors can use perceived effectiveness information to assist in selecting methods to improve their teaching.

 Instructor Evaluations of Introductory Psychology Teaching Techniques
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Concerns About "Teaching" at Professional Conferences
Perlman, B. & McCann, L. I. (2001). Poster. Annual National Institute on the Teaching of Psychology. St. Petersburg Beach, FL.

Most efforts to improve teaching involve undergraduate or graduate instruction. Other pedagogy, largely ignored in the literature, occurs when psychologists teach and learn at professional conferences. How might this teaching be improved?

Concerns About "Teaching" at Professional Conferences
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Entrepreneurship in Public Colleges and Universities
Baron Perlman (January 2002). Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurs. Reno, NV.

Institutions of higher education in the United States are integral to our society's well being, the envy of the world, while at the same time chastised for not performing as well as they should. They must be managed well, especially if new ideas are to be implemented and flourish. Many would consider institutions of higher education to be the future of our society.

Entrepreneurship in Public Colleges and Universities
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What We Need to Know About Teaching and Teachers
Baron Perlman and Lee I McCann. (January 2000). PsychTeacher Excellence in Teaching.

It is critical that we learn all we can about undergraduate teaching both for ourselves and our students. Better understanding of the phenomenology and complexities of college teaching will help faculty, both new and senior alike, and administrators, maintain and improve pedagogy, faculty vitality, and faculty commitment to a teaching career.

What We Need to Know About Teaching and Teachers
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Students' Classroom Experiences as Guides for Better Teaching
Baron Perlman and Lee I. McCann. Keynote Address,17th Annual Mid-America Conference for Teachers of Psychology, October, 2000, Evansville, IN

Teaching conferences are special in that they focus on what faculty do the most &emdash; teach. MACTOP is devoted to the teaching of psychology, providing an occasion for thoughtful discussion and reflection on teaching, as opposed to the often hurried and stressed pace we all encounter at our home institutions. We hope that you will put the everyday work issues away for today and tomorrow, and enjoy the people and ideas here in Evansville. In some small way we hope that you charge or recharge your teaching batteries, and that MACTOP assists you in pursuing your personal goal, however defined, of being a better teacher this semester than you were the last.

Students' Classroom Experiences as Guides for Better Teaching
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Student Perspectives on the First Day of Class
Perlman, B. & McCann, L. I. (1999). Teaching of Psychology, 26, 171-176.

The faculty-oriented literature on the first meeting of a class presents many suggestions for content and process. Student data support these suggestions except those urging starting course content and students' divergent views of icebreakers. Being attuned to both student opinions and the faculty literature will help faculty prepare and teach a good first class. Based on student data, 10 of 11 participating faculty made voluntary changes in how they taught the first class meeting the next semester.

Student Perspectives on the First Day of Class
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Students' Pet Peeves About Teaching
Perlman, B. & McCann, L. I. (1998). Teaching of Psychology, 28, 201-203.

Knowing students' concerns about teaching can improve one's pedagogy. Pet peeves about teacher behavior gathered from 671 undergraduates in psychology classes revealed that organization and planning, mechanics, lecture styles and techniques, and testing were the concerns most frequently mentioned and easily remedied. Eleven of 13 participating faculty members made voluntary changes in their teaching within I week of collecting data and that continue 2 semesters later.

Students' Pet Peeves About Teaching
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A Faculty Perspective on Teaching Assistant Training
Perlman, B., McCann, L. I., & McFadden, S. H. (1997). Teaching of Psychology, 24, 167-171.

The quality and type of instruction teaching assistants (TAs) receive provide basic preparation for a faculty career. We sampled 249 chairs of psychology departments offering doctoral programs. Questionnaire results show that faculty respondents (a) identify TA responsibilities in a variety of pedagogical areas, (b) describe a diverse set of TA training components, and (c) rate TA supervisors as experienced in both working with TAs and as undergraduate teachers. Faculty respondents describe a pedagogical base from which new faculty with TA experience may continue to develop as teachers.

Faculty Perspective on Teaching Assistant Training
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Applicants For a Faculty Position Do Not Emphasize Teaching.
Perlman, B., Marxen, J., McFadden, S. H. & McCann, L. I. (1997). Teaching of Psychology, 23, 103-104.

Cover letters, curricula vitae, and teaching statements of 82 doctoral candidates and 74 PhD applicants for an assistant professor position were examined for teaching-related content. Applicants presented little teaching information. The discussion focuses on understanding this lacuna and offers recommendations for correcting the problem.

Applicants For a Faculty Position Do Not Emphasize Teaching
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New Faculty Want To Teach
Perlman, B., Konop, K., McFadden, S. H. & McCann, L. I. (1996). Teaching of Psychology, 23, 232-234.

Applicants for a tenure-line assistant professor position in cog-nitive psychology at a public regional university were surveyed on their teaching preparation, interest, and experience 3 years later. Respondents (n = 76) rated their preparation to teach under graduates as good or excellent, and they demonstrated a strong interest in teaching.

New Faculty Want To Teach
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Faculty Recruitment and Excellent Undergraduate Teaching
McFadden, S. H. & Perlman, B. (1989). Teaching of Psychology, 16, 195-198.

The successful recruitment of a faculty member who can provide high-quality undergraduate teaching requires a rigorous self-study by the department and careful observations of the candidate. A conceptual model provides a framework that describes charac-teristics of excellent undergraduate teachers. This model can shape both the self-study and contacts with job applicants. Exam-ination of the intellectual, emotional, and moral dimensions of three elements of teaching&emdash;perceived self-efficacy, interpersonal relationships, and pedagogy&emdash;will assist a department in prepar-ing for and conducting a search for a qualified candidate who will teach well

Faculty Recruitment and Excellent Undergraduate Teaching
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