Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
Personal tools
You are here: Home > Inspirations > Environmental Philosophy

Environmental Philosophy

by Barnhill, David L last modified Aug 28, 2010 02:58 PM

What is nature? What value does it have? What is our relationship to it? What is our responsibility to it?

“A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise."
--Aldo Leopold, Sand County Almanac (London: Oxford University Press, 1968), 224-225. 

“[A] land ethic changes the role of Homo sapiens from conqueror of the land-community to plain member and citizen of it. It implies respect for his fellow-members, and also respect for the community as such.”
--Aldo Leopold, Sand County Almanac (London: Oxford University Press, 1968), 204.

“No important change in ethics was ever accomplished without an internal change in our intellectual emphasis, loyalties, affections, and convictions. The proof that conservation has not yet touched these foundations of conduct lies in the fact that philosophy and religion have not yet hear of it.”
--Aldo Leopold, Sand County Almanac (London: Oxford University Press, 1968), 209-210.

When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe.
--John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierras (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1916), 157.

There is not a "fragment" in all nature, for every relative fragment of one thing is a full harmonious unit in itself.
--John Muir, A Thousand Mile Walk to the Gulf (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1916), 164.

 

Document Actions
by Barnhill, David L last modified Aug 28, 2010 02:58 PM