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Teaching

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TEACHING STATEMENT

"Teaching" is to show students, how to use theoretical knowledge in solving real problems. My industrial experience has a significant influence on my vision of theoretical and practical lectures. Besides teaching fundamental classes, I would like to develop courses related to energy flow and management in industry.

My main goal is to teach students understanding physical phenomena of energy-related processes. It is crucial to show, that surrounding world is the large system of various mechanisms that can be separated with appropriate boundary conditions and described by proper mathematical formulations. I try to develop my lectures upon experience and observations. Providing real life examples makes lectures as well as laboratories easier and more intuitive.

Beside lectures and laboratories, the other ways of practical implementation of theoretical knowledge are design projects involving student groups, which provide vital opportunities of effective work as a team. Integral parts of these projects are reports and presentations with using appropriate modern computer techniques.

I have high expectations and requirements for students in the area of presentation skills, and hope that students will appreciate their improved communication skills once they join the work force.

I consider visits in factories and discussions with specialists about production processes as a crucial point in education of young engineers. Besides great possibilities for meeting with potential employers, such visits are excellent opportunities for students to verify their theoretical knowledge with real applications.

An outstanding lecturer should be aware of a group dynamics. In my opinion, identifying the students by their full names and knowing some background information (like country of origin or interests) is very beneficial. It helps to personalize the teaching process. I observed situations in the past where a few of the weaker or shy students who needed additional help would hesitate to ask. Personalizing the process may break this barrier.

Students tend to learn more effectively from an approachable teacher who builds his position based on professionalism. I prepare myself very carefully for my lectures. I limit the use own notes during lectures to prove to students my deep understanding of the discussed material.

Finally, I believe that the role of a teacher is to show the path, motivate, encourage, and lead by example. This gives me an immense sense of accomplishment and motivates me to continue my teaching.

 

Oshkosh 02/01/2017

 

TAUGHT COURSES

Code Title Course description Semester Syllabus
ENGR 116 Basic Manufacturing Processes

The course introduces machining, stamping, casting, forging and joining of metallic and non-metallic materials. Covers the basic machining processes used to cut, form and shape materials to desired forms, dimensions and surface finishes. Students examine the manufacturing of metals, heat treating, foundry work, metals and plastics casting, rolling, extrusion and welding.

Student outcomes /According to Criteria For Accrediting Engineering Technology Programs 2017-2018/:

e. an ability to function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team;

f. an ability to identify and analyze, basic manufacturing processes;

g. an ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and nontechnical environments;

h. an understanding of the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development;

k. a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

Spring 2017
ENGR 221 Machine Components

The course the basic concepts and techniques used in the design of a machine. The components studied include shafts, screws, permanent joints, springs, bearings, gears, clutches, belts and other hardware.

Student outcomes /According to Criteria For Accrediting Engineering Technology Programs 2017-2018/:

a. an ability to select and apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools for understanding operation principles and manufacturing of machine components;

b. an ability to select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, and mechanics of materials to machine design problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies;

d. an ability to recognize and design machine components such as belts, sheaves, bearings, gears, estimate the forces applied on shafts and gear teeth during power transmission, etc.;

f. an ability to identify, analyze, and solve problems related to basic machine components;

g. an ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and nontechnical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature;

k. a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

Spring 2017
ENGR 320 Motors and Drives

Selection, setup and circuitry associated with AC and DC drives and motors. Topics include DC motors and generator configuration, shunt, compound, and permanent magnet DC motor performance and characteristics. Series DC, compound DC, AC induction, specialty machine performance and characteristics, stepper motors, servomotors, and three-phase power systems are also included.

Student outcomes /According to Criteria For Accrediting Engineering Technology Programs 2017-2018/:

a. an ability to select and apply the fundamental circuits knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools in electrical motor controls used in manufacturing engineering technology;

c. an ability to conduct standard tests and measurements of basic electrical elements implemented in complex control systems; to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments; and to apply experimental results to improve processes;

d. an ability to design control electrical systems, or components supporting engineering, manufacturing systems;

e. an ability to function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team;

f. an ability to identify, analyze, and troubleshoot problems related to electrical motor controls;

g. an ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication related to electrical systems in both technical and non-technical environments;

k. a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

Spring 2017
ENGR 105 Fundamentals of Drawings

The course introduces common industry drafting practices in the design process with an emphasis on computer aided drafting (AutoCAD). Topics include sketching, drawing setup and organization, dimensioning, orthographic and isometric projections, and CAD standards and guidelines.

The aim of the course is to teach students to:

  • Visualize parts and simple assemblies in 2D,
  • Read and create communicative drawings,
  • Present drawings in a professional, neat, and orderly manner that can be understood and evaluated by others knowledgeable in the field of engineering,
  • Make basic geometrical measurements necessary in drafting technical documentation,
  • Define appropriate dimensions, tolerances, and specifications, used in industrial sector,
  • Work with CAD software (AutoCAD),
  • Team work during the drawings preparation.

The course outcomes meet the ABET requirements specified in the Criterion 3 in points a, b, c, e, f, g, h and k.

Fall 2016
ENGR 220 Mechanics of Materials

The course Introduces the distribution of forces in materials, trusses and other rigid structures under load. Topics include stress and strain, torsion, shear and bending moments, thermal expansion and stress, Mohr's Circle, and column theory. Analysis techniques to ensure that a component is safe with respect to strength, rigidity and stability are included.

The aim of the course is to teach students to:

  • Understand, recognize, and apply mechanics of materials theoretical concepts in engineering practice,
  • Define and estimate quantitatively internal stresses under various types of the loads inchosen construction structures,
  • Present calculations in a professional, neat, and orderly manner that can be understood and evaluated by others knowledgeable in the field of mechanics of materials
  • Make basic measurements in compressed, tensioned, bended, sheared and buckledsimple structures.
  • Prepare and present measurements report in a professional manner with particular emphasis on the process description and data analysis.
  • Team working during the laboratory demonstrations.

The course outcomes meet the ABET requirements specified in the Criterion 3 in points a, b, c, e, f, g, h and k.

Fall 2016
ENGR 322 Engineering Design Problems

Students apply design principles and methods to create a product or a machine. Students work within a team to prepare concept sketches, assembly drawings, detail drawings, and perform stress and cost analysis.

The aim of the course is to teach students to:

  • Understand complexity of mechanical design process.
  • Analyze and understand published case studies in related areas.
  • Identify real problems and propose solutions solving it.
  • Present results of the design process in a professional, neat, and orderly manner that can be understood and evaluated by others knowledgeable in the field.
  • Use of various knowledge sources in problem solving
  • Prepare and present report in a professional manner with particular emphasis on the process description and data analysis.
  • Team work during the design process.

The course outcomes meet the ABET requirements specified in the Criterion 3 in points a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h and k.

Fall 2016
ENGR 308 Finite Elements Analysis TBA Spring 2016
ENGR 365 Heat and Mass Transfer

The course covers presentation of three heat transfer modes: (i) conduction (steady state 1D and 2D, transient mode), (ii) convection (forced, free), and radiation. In addition problems related to heat exchangers and mass diffusion problem will be discussed.

The aim of the course is to teach students to:

  • Formulate and understand heat transfer modes in engineering practice,
  • Formulate and quantitatively estimate heat transfer rates in conduction, convection, and radiation modes (energy balance),
  • Explain and quantify energy effects during boiling and condensation,
  • Perform energy analysis for heat exchangers,
  • Present calculations in a professional, neat, and orderly manner that can be understood and evaluated by others knowledgeable in the field of heat transfer,
  • Make basic measurements in real systems and prepare professional reports with particular emphasis on the process description and data analysis,

The course outcomes meet the ABET requirements specified in the Criterion 3 in points a, b, c, e, f, g, h and k.

Spring 2016
PHYS 201 Statics This course is a problem-focused science class for pre-engineering students where we will study the action of forces on bodies at rest or in equilibrium. The fundamentals of critical thinking and problem solving will be emphasized.
Static force systems in two and three dimensions. Includes composition and resolution of force vectors, principles of equilibrium applied to various bodies, simple structures, and friction. Centroids and moments of inertia.
Spring 2016
ENGR 220 Mechanics of Materials
/see Fall 2016/ Fall 2015 ---
ENGR 221 Machine Components /see Spring 2017/ Fall 2015 ---
ENGR 330 Thermodynamics After the course, students will be able to formulate the Thermodynamics Laws, qualitatively formulate and quantitatively estimate power/refrigeration cycles, estimate energy effect of chemical reactions and apply acquired knowledge in real engineering systems.
The course is split into two parts. The first part introduces the properties of pure substances, the first and second thermodynamics laws, and thermodynamic definitions of entropy and exergy terms. The second part focuses on power and refrigeration cycles. In addition, basic information about chemical reactions (combustion) will be discussed. All together combined will allow future engineers to perform energy analysis of engineering systems.
Fall 2015
PHYS 107 General Physics I
/Laboratory/ Fall 2015 ---
ENGR 320 Motors and Drives
/see Spring 2017/ Spring 2015 ---
PHYS 108 General Physics II
/Discussion/ Spring 2015 ---
PHYS 201 Statics /see Spring 2016/ Spring 2015 ---
ENGR 101 Fundamentals of Engineering Technology This course is designed to equip engineering technology students with the necessary tools and background information to prepare them to be a successful student as well as a successful practicing engineering technologist.
Topics covered in this course include ethics, project managements, team work, working with data, creating presentations, engineering design and a thorough understanding of the engineering technology profession.
Fall 2014
ENGR 105 Fundamentals of Drawings /see Fall 2016/ Fall 2014 ---
ENGR 220 Mechanics of Materials
/see Fall 2016/ Fall 2014 ---

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