Archive for the 'Faculty/Staff' Category

Career Fair Do’s and Definitely Do not’s

Career Fairs and networking can be nerve-wracking, but we’ve got you covered as long as you present yourself professionally and have done your research. Take a look at our entertaining elevator pitch examples: 7 Tips For Career Fair Success where we demonstrate some of our recommended do’s…

Clip from: Seven Tips For Success

And our definitely do not’s:

It's good to be confident and personal but probably best not to act like this around an employer

It’s good to be confident and personal but probably best not to act like this around an employer

(Click on the screen shots or the 7 Tips for Career Fair Success above the picture to check out this fun video)

Career Fairs only come around once in awhile so take advantage of having hundreds of options all in one place. Make sure to dress for success, come practiced and prepared and ready to make a professional impression. These events often lead to employment or internship positions and provide ample networking time.

Tweet to Connect, Master Twitter Networking With These Tips

Twitter is the latest form of networking that is blowing up social-media using a form known as micro-blogging. Twitter limits users to 140 characters per post and allows linking to websites, connecting to other people or organizations by mentioning their Twitter handle (which is what we call the username with an @ symbol in front of it), and also hash tagging.

Users are free to use their Twitter account however they choose, whether it’s for personal expression, business, humor, social networking or information sharing. However, employers do take Twitter and social networking sites into consideration when getting to know prospective employees. For example, your drunken tweet from Saturday night with a picture of you doing a beer bong may have just cost you the job opportunity.

Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube are several sites that are changing the field of PR, new media and traditional media. It’s much more than a rolling news feed of status updates. It’s a source for advertising, talking with consumers, engaging other groups, promoting products or events, providing customer service and demonstrating service with pictures.

So how can you use Twitter professionally?

By using @ you can connect to specific users and create a relationship with them.

The hash tag # symbol makes your tweets searchable and allows you to join in chats. It allows you to follow certain news and connect with other tweeters.

Make your Twitter you personal brand. Remember: Be interesting. Avoid toilet tweets. No one wants to know about your bodily functions. It’s also best to avoid sexual, religious, political and obscene tweets. Connect with professionals by sharing useful and intelligent or informational links. You can shrink the links to save space for descriptions or ideas by using link-shortening sites like bitly.com.

Check out this info-graphic from Mediabistro.com pertaining to social websites and employment. http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwitter/twitter-posts-job_b27156

Social media affects employment opportunities.

Social media affects employment opportunities.

 

Career Services Intern Chai Lee Explores What Can Career Services Do For You?

Career Services Human Resources Intern Chai Lee

Hi Everyone,

Why come to Career Services?

Career Services can help you find jobs and internships, work on resumes, cover letters, and networking.  There also events that are held by Career Services such as, Career Fairs, Mock Interview, and Dining with Professionals and many more.  All students can use Career Services for free up until one year after graduation.  So use the opportunity to use Career Services because you also paid for all of these services so why not use the service.

All Students can use the services during Walk-In hours from 11:00AM to 1:00PM on Tuesday through Thursday or call to make appointment with the choice of advisor by majors.

Here is the website to see which advisor would best fit your needs.

http://www.uwosh.edu/career/about-us/professional-staff

My Internship Experience:

I want to share a little bit of my experience while I am an intern here at Career Services.  My name is Chai Lee, a Human Services Major.  Being an intern at Career Services, I had a lot of fun and also did a lot of exploration.  First of all, I worked on my resume and cover letter of a choice of employers that I want to work with.  I participated in the Career Fair; I got to meet many of employers and student from different majors.  During the Career Fair, I met with three different employers and gave my resume to them to look at.  Next, I attended class presentations with different advisers on topics of interviewing, portfolio, and general ideas of what is Career Services is.  Attending class presentations helped develop my professional skills and allowed me to find helpful resources.  My next step was the networking part, which I participated in Dining with Professionals and did the Mock Interview.  I did Dining with Professionals, where I met employers such as J.J. Keller, Alta Resources, Sherwin Williams and Big Brothers Big Sisters.  I had a choice of where I could sit, so I decided to sit at the table of Big Brothers Big Sisters and our host was Ellen Evensen.  During the dining, it is more of follow the leader or the host who talked about what to eat and drink with professional people.  At the end of the dining, I had some extra time to talk to Ellen and then she offered for me to send in my resume and cover letter for an internship opportunity.  I was so happy that I participated in Dining with Professionals and met employers from different companies.  I also attended Mock Interviews which was also with Ellen of Big Brothers Big Sisters.  Before hand, I did research about the agency and the person who interviewed me, so I had an idea of what the agency’s main role is.  The Mock Interview went really well and I liked it because it built my confidence and learned what I should say and not say to the employer.  Overall, being at Career Services, help me to get out of my comfort zone and explore the world.

~Chai Lee

Career Services: Together We Make It Better

Federal Internships



By Emily Colon 

The webinar “Go Government: Landing your Dream Internship” took place on Feb. 8, 2012. The facilitator was career adviser Cassie Curry from Career Services. There were a decent number of attendees for an auditory webinar.

The two panel members, Chris Hogan and Jessica Wahl, were featured. Chris works for Homeland Security and Jessica works for the Department of the Interior. They talked about a variety of topics including how there are many different opportunities within federal jobs. Websites where you can go to find federal internships are USA.gov, makingthedifference.org and usajobs.gov.

There are also many third party internship providers such as agency websites, career development centers, career fairs, social media and personal networks.

Some facts about federal jobs are that they offer excellent pay and benefits, high levels of responsibility, valuable work experience, flexible schedules, training and professional development and great travel opportunities.

The panelists talked about the different bureaus and how there are internships for every major. Jessica said that the breadth of experience you get is great. Chris added that you get unique opportunities.

Some advice the panelists gave was to tailor your resume by using the job announcement, expand your experiences and make a master resume. Something interesting they mentioned was that federal agencies prefer if you wait until they contact you with a job opportunity rather than you contact them because they get many applications.

If you are interested in a federal internship, check out Titan Jobs, an online database with job postings and much more. And if you need help with tailoring your resume, make sure to make an appointment here at with a resource specialist at Career Services Ph: (920)424-2181

Students helping students

By Emily Colon 

Have you ever needed help with your resume or had a question but were too scared or intimidated to ask for help? What if I could tell you that you can get help from a student just like you? I am not saying that if you need help you shouldn’t ask for it because that is one thing you should do, ask for help, and the perfect place to ask for help is at Career Services.

Let’s say that you have your resume and need it to be done in a few hours and don’t have time to sit down with an advisor but you would like a second opinion. Well all you need to do is go down to Career Services and ask a Career Resource Specialist to read it over for you and they will gladly do it. You are probably wondering what a Career Resource Specialist is.

A CRS is a number of people who are students just like you who you would see at the front desk of Career Services. You’d imagine that is all they do, but they do endless tasks, and I learned a lot of what they do in the week that I spent with them. It is amazing how much I learned about Career Services, what a CRS does, and about the Career Resource Specialists themselves in just one week.

CRS’s do so many things to help students. They work the front desk as I mentioned before, answer any questions a student may have, answer phone calls, schedule appointments, help with mail, do tasks assigned by advisors, keep track of who is in or out of the office, help direct students where they need to go, help students with quick resume questions or any other quick career questions they may have, make copies, help make and follow the calendar and check-in appointments.

So those are only a few of the many jobs that Career Resource Specialists do. If you ever need help with a resume or have a question about a job or career or even grad school, do not hesitate to come down to Career Services and get them answered.

Meet our past CRS’s

Pam Johnson graduated in May with a bachelor’s degree in Liberal Studies. An interesting fact about her is that she is from the suburbs of Chicago.

Bree Francour is an elementary education major in grades one through eight. She has a minor in Spanish. She is also a junior at UWO. She was the new Spring 2012 CRS lead and all of us at Career Services are very proud of her. A unique fact about Bree is that she studied abroad in Spain for a month on an interim trip.

Ashley Nealon is a finance major with a Spanish minor. She will be a senior at UWO and loves cheese.

Aleah VanGheem is a Music Education major. She will also be a junior at UWO. An awesome talent she has is that she can play five instruments. However, she wants to be a choir teacher in the future.

 

Charles Block will also be a senior at UWO with a major in supply chain management. An interesting fact about him is that he has four children.

Cassie James is an education major. An interesting fact about her is that she is from Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Justin Lyons is a double major in Spanish and German with a history minor. He will be a junior at UWO and enjoys laughing at internet websites.

Brewers Career Fair at Miller Park

By Chrissy Lambie (@chrissylambie)

On Monday, April 23, career adviser Erin Rammer and I attended the Brewers Career Fair at Miller Park. Both Erin and I are big Brewers fans and when we saw the opportunity to combine our love of baseball, Brewers and helping students make connections in the sports industry, we had to make the trip!

Erin and I arrived at Miller Park at 4:00 p.m., and to our surprise there were many candidates looking to make connections with the representatives from the organizations in attendance. Both Erin and I are career fair pros and were pretty amazed that there were waits up to half an hour to speak to some of the representatives. We are used to seeing a line of 3 or 4 to talk to a representative, but when you see a line of 40 or 50 it can be pretty overwhelming.

Not to be intimidated, Erin and I talked to representatives from the Chicago Rush, Chicago Sky, Milwaukee Wave, ESPN Radio 540/1510, Wisconsin State Golf Association, Milwaukee Admirals, and Milwaukee Brewers. The few groups that we didn’t get a chance to talk to were the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers (where we have established connections already) and the Milwaukee Bucks. Also in attendance were a couple of graduate programs from the Milwaukee area promoting their sports management programs.

It is our hope that by making these connections students at UW Oshkosh interested in breaking into the sports industry will have the opportunity to see internships and other positions posted in Titan Jobs. Also, we hope to help students make connections with the various representatives associated with these organizations.

As a result of this trip, I’ve already made a great connection at ESPN Deportes 1510 that is interested in students that want a radio experience and have Spanish speaking skills.

While this trip was a combination of work and play, Erin and I felt it was successful on both hands. We made some great professional connections that may pay off for UW Oshkosh students in the future!

On a fun note, after the career fair we were able to watch Brewers batting practice where I walked away with a practice ball that was tossed into the stands by third-base coach Ed Sedar. And during the third inning both Erin and I were featured on the jumbotron in the US Cellular fan photo of the day with the player cutout John Axford. We won his t-shirt. Erin was gracious enough to let me take the t-shirt home! Thanks Erin!

UWO Career Services Video Blog: Shopping for Professional Outfits on a Budget

Our Career Advisor, Jacob Griesbach, is here to share his experience on an interoffice competition that he rocked out on a budget! This Vlog is to made to show you how affordable it is to dress professionally. Jacob takes a tour of Oshkosh, finding steals in every corner, so check it out!!

Networking with a Purpose

By Craig Smith

Everybody remembers their starting point; mine in the coaching industry was as a permanent substitute and coach in the Southwestern Wisconsin School District. At the time I was applying for college coaching jobs and posting the rejection letters on my refrigerator as motivation. Two years and 17 rejection letters later, I walked into the office my college football coach and asked for a job. He laid out some ground rules and told me that I would be working for below minimum wage and if I didn’t carry my weight I would be let go.

Those rejection letters were the last jobs I have applied for without being contacted by an employer, which had spoken to somebody in my network, asking me to apply or hearing about a position through my network. When I first started networking I did it without a purpose, no goals, no real understanding of what I was trying to accomplish, then complaining that it was impossible to get interviews when you don’t know anybody.

The whole process seemed impossible to me. Essentially, I was attempting to network with CEO’s and wondering how to become them instead of identifying those that held my position at a higher level or those in higher positions at the same level and building that network. Once my delusions of grandeur subsided and I started to build honest solid relationships, opportunities presented themselves, doors opened and I was prepared to walk through them. 12 years later I am not ready for the job that I thought I was entitled to when I started in this profession.

I continue to learn my craft to better myself and those I work with for the position I currently hold. Recently I had the opportunity to go to the University of Michigan for three days to meet with their coaching staff to see how they do things first hand. The goal was not to leave Michigan with a job offer, my goals were as follows:

  1. Meet and network with those that are in the same “field” as I am within my career
    1. Learn about their philosophies as it relates to the game and player development
    2. Discuss their philosophies on what it takes to be a coach today as well as trends they have seen or see coming
    3. Discuss their career path and their goals
    4. Meet and network with other college or high school coaches throughout our visit to give exposure to UW Oshkosh and myself

This opportunity is no different than any other conference people attend to better develop their skills.  While networking is a piece that presents itself, the goal of professional conferences is to get better at your career. You cannot be there to network 100% of the time. People will notice that and will question your loyalty and commitment to your current job. Who would turn around and hire a person that they did not trust?!

When meeting people that are in the same job at a higher level or at a bigger company, they go through the same ups and downs as you but theirs get amplified. They are a great reference to learn from through informational interviews, but you do not want to waste their time selling yourself. Remember, the best networkers talk less than 10% of the time!  Have questions prepared, do not let opportunities slip through your fingers because of lack of preparation. Know who you will be meeting, their product, and what similarities you share.

Asking questions about the person can be tricky. It helps in my situation they have bio’s up online for me to read through first. The easiest questions, in my opinion, are asking where they attended school, what they studied and where their first position was (for more tips see Conversation Stack link below).

http://podcast1.uwosh.edu/users/careerservices/weblog/d9c15/Conversation_Stacking.html

Always be prepared to be the one being networked with. For every position there is somebody trying to get there. Do not be a one way networker! Do not only find the time to network when it is a benefit to you, you must be willing to give back and help the development of others. If you have trouble with that, think about it from this perspective, you never know whose niece or nephew you are talking to or what field you may end up in or on.

For more on networking and to find networking opportunities on campus, click here.

Forward: A Civil Discussion on Wisconsin’s Present and Future

As part of a new interdisciplinary initiative of the American Democracy Project, a discussion will be held on Wednesday, April 4, from 7:00-8:30 p.m. in Reeve 227.

The plan is to spend most of the time listening to each other as participants discuss three questions:
-How does my life/my major/my work intersect with state policies and state politics?
-What is my impression about the state of the state and its people?
-What can I do to engage with others and make a positive difference in the state?
People will sit at round tables with about six or seven others, including a student facilitator and a faculty/staff facilitator. There will be a chance to share ideas and thoughts with the broader group as well. Volunteer groups and community members are encouraged to join.
The event is envisioned as a way to get people from multiple disciplines and colleges learning more about how politics intersect with what we all do, and how what we all do intersect with politics, in a nonpartisan and civil way.
If you have a class that you would like to get involved in the Forward Discussion or if you would like to act as one of the facilitators or just join in, please contact David Siemers (siemers@uwosh.edu, 424-0435) or Carleen Vandezande (vandezac@uwosh.edu, 424-3190).

Copyright 2012-2013 The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System