Author Archive for Austyn Boothe

Artisan workshops!

Yesterday was packed!

We started the day finishing up our construction projects! After showers that involved lots of soap and scrubbing to remove cement we all split into three groups to attend artisan workshops.

I attended the textile workshop and met Eliva who told us of how De La Gente was able to help her get a loan so she could quit her factory job and start making purses. We got to pick out traditional Guatemalan fabrics for our bags. She let us practice with her sewing machine..which I broke right away. Typical me. It was an easy fix, Eliva just needed to replace the needle.  It was pretty clear that sewing is not in my skill set! We all got to help sew our bags and we ended up buying a lot of extra products from her!

Eric and Crystal in our group went to the iron working workshop! They each got to outline, cut out, hammer, and paint iron lizards. They by far had the most labor intensive workshop, and were sweating afterwards! The hike to the top of the workshop wasn’t even the hardest part! Cutting out iron with scissors turned out to be pretty rough. “Tough?! Near impossible!!”-Eric. Carlos their teacher has made an entire house out of iron! They also found out that chickens aren’t pets here….check out our next post for more about that….

Shelby, Danielle, and Molly went to the wood working workshop! Where they met Jorge a wood worker. They learned how to use different tools a got to make wood serving trays! They got to pick out traditional fabrics to enclose in their trays. Next up was sanding and staining the trays. After the trays were finished, they got to go look at his shop and see a bunch of wood furniture with looks of detail that he had made by hand!

It was great to come back to De La Gente at the end of the night and show off all of our new products!

See ya,



Day 3: Black Gold

Hello all!

Today was our first full day in Gautemala and it has been quite the learning experience!

We woke up at around 7:30am and had fresh eggs and beans for breakfast! It sounds so simplistic but it was amazing. We then hiked up Volcano Aqua. It took our group about a half hour to get to the plantation, it was a really steep hike but the view made it worth it!

Once up to the plantation we learned all about planting, growing, and caring for coffee plants. A few of us even dared to try the raw coffee fruit and drink what the locals call “honey” from the fruit! We picked coffee fruit for about an hour and a half. In total our group picked about 69lbs…which sounds impressive but really isn’t!

We next went to Froilan’s (the owner of the coffee plantation) house for lunch. His family taught us how to separate the fruit from the coffee beans! Who knew it could take up for ten days to dry the coffee beans out?! We each took a turn roasting and grinding our coffee so we could each have a fresh cup. Our group ended up buying about 54 bags of coffee all harvested by Froilan!

After that we enjoyed our first meal without our translator! It was an awesome experience getting to pr actice my Spanish for the first time! We met with Gregorio’s family and learned that he has worked with De La Gente for about seven years! His daughter Julia taught us how to salsa and despite the language barrier we were able to have a wonderful traditional Guatemalan dinner.


Tomorrow we wake up bright and early again to help paint and build a coffee fermantation tank for a farmer!



Today is FINALLY the day!

Hello all!

My name is Austyn! I’m the other blogger for our lovely trip to Guatemala! We’ve officially been traveling for about 24 hours! Right now we’re all eating free breakfast at the hotel! Today we finally get to head to Guatemala to visit Antigua and hopefully see some ruins. Plus, we will be learning about the coffee farms! The awesome thing about this new flight is we all get to sit together! Check back with us later when we finally get to Guetamala

See ya,

ASB Guatemala



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