HANDBOOK FOR GEOLOGY MAJORS
2013-2014

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                                                
Geology as a Profession
Undergraduate Studies in Geology at UW Oshkosh
The Geology Faculty of UW Oshkosh
Teaching Academic Staff
Support Staff
Emeriti Faculty
Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Geology
Professional Emphasis in Geology
Professional Emphasis in Hydrogeology
Liberal Arts Emphasis in Geology
Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Education Degree with a Major in Secondary Earth Science Education
Prerequisites
Course Scheduling
Recommended Four-Year Plan for B.S. Degree in Geology: Professional Emphases in Geology and in Hydrogeology
Recommended Four-Year Plan for B.S. Degree in Geology: Liberal Arts Emphasis
Recommended Four-Year Plan for B.S. Degree in Secondary Education: Earth Science
Undergraduate Course Offerings in Geology
Where Do I Go From Here?
Some Examples of Geology Careers of Graduates of the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
Graduate Schools Attended by Geology Graduates of the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh


GEOLOGY AS A PROFESSION

If you are curious about the natural world and like to be out-of-doors, might find a career as a geologist interesting and rewarding. Geologists study rocks, fossils, soils, waters, and the Earth's deep interior in order to learn the history of the Earth and to discover valuable resources such as oil, minerals, and safe water supplies. Geologists also work with engineers in making geologic studies of sites for such things as power plants, bridges, landfills, or radioactive waste disposal. If our present lifestyle is to continue, geologists must find ever-increasing amounts of energy and metallic mineral resources. Geologists are employed by energy and resource companies, consulting firms, state and federal agencies, schools and universities.

Many jobs in geology require a Master's degree, so if you are planning a career in geology you should anticipate four years of undergraduate study and two years in graduate school. Most graduate students have a part-time university job that pays for their schooling, and many find summer jobs in geology that enhance their education as well as provide additional income.

A degree in geology prepares students well for a variety of paths in life because of the broad exposure to the sciences and mathematics that is required. Though most of our departmental alumni have jobs in geology, a large number also are employed in a diverse range of jobs related and unrelated to geology.


UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES IN GEOLOGY AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN OSHKOSH

The faculty of the Department of Geology at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh is proud of its reputation for offering an excellent undergraduate program. The success of UW Oshkosh graduates reflects this excellence, which has been further verified by formal expert evaluation. The seven faculty members, all of whom hold the Ph.D. degree, were carefully chosen to represent a wide range of geological specialities. Each is actively engaged in research as well as teaching.  Approximately thirty undergraduate courses are offered, and each is taught by a faculty member with special expertise developed by graduate study and research.  There are presently about 60 geology majors. The Department Web site (www.uwosh.edu/geology/) provides a good deal of information about us.

The Department of Geology has excellent facilities and equipment. It occupies a remodeled building with specialized laboratories and space for student research. Students have the opportunity for "hands-on" experience with scientific equipment that at many schools is available only to graduate students. Instrumentation includes a state-of-the-art, computerized Rigaku X-ray diffractometer for rock and mineral study, water-well monitoring and logging systems for use in 2 water wells adjacent to Harrington Hall, and geophysical equipment such as a Global Positioning System receiver, gravity meter, 48-channel seismograph, proton precession magnetometer, and earth resistivity instruments. At present there are nine computers specifically designated for student use.

The Department offers majors in Geology and in Secondary Earth Science Education. There are three emphases within the Geology major.  Most students select either the Professional Emphasis in Geology or the Professional Emphasis in Hydrogeology. Both emphases require credits in chemistry, mathematics, physics, and computer skills in addition to those in geology.  Either of these emphases is recommended for students planning graduate school.  Former students with these emphases have told us they were very well prepared for graduate school. The Professional Emphasis in Hydrogeology also is suitable for students who will seek employment as a hydrogeologist following graduation.  The Liberal Arts Emphasis in Geology is for students who want a general, non-professional liberal arts education leading to either a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree. The Secondary Earth Science Education major is designed for education majors who want to teach Earth Science at the junior or senior high school level.

The Geology faculty members want to help students through the program and guide them toward graduation. Because of this we ask all majors to see their geology advisor each semester before they register. This is an opportunity for students to make sure they are taking the right courses, have the proper prerequisites, get recommendations about courses, or ask questions and seek guidance about their life after graduation.

Students may request a specific advisor or be assigned an advisor--it's up to the ndividual.  New majors may do either by going to the Geology Department office. Students may also ask to change advisors at any time.

For additional information on advising and geology as a career, and otherhelpful links, visit http://www.uwosh.edu/geology/advising/advising.php.


THE GEOLOGY FACULTY OF UW OSHKOSH

Dr. Chad Deering
Chad teaches Physical Geology, Lithology, Geochemistry, and Mineral Deposits. His current research with students includes topics such as the coupling of the physical properties of magma with geochemistry, growth of the continental crust, heat and mass transfer in magmatic systems, the effects of caldera collapse on subvolcanic magmatic systems, multivariate statistical analysis of geochemical data examining mixing/mingling in magmas, and the identification of blind geothermal resources in New Zealand. He recently visited the Sierra de Valle Fértil, Argentina, to study world-class exposures of lower crust from the Ordovician Famatinian magmatic arc.

He received his B.S. and M.S. from Michigan State University and Ph.D. from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, where he also lectured on igneous and metamorphic petrology and volcanology following the completion of his degree. Subsequently, he worked as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Washington, studying caldera collapse and excess degassing in volcanoes of the Kos-Nisyros Islands of Greece and the physical dynamics of magma reservoir processes.

Dr. Eric Hiatt
Eric teaches Sedimentology, Oceanography, Sedimentary Petrology, and Physical Geology. He also teaches field courses in Bermuda and the Florida Keys that involve study of modern coral reefs, sedimentology, oceanography, carbonate geochemistry, the Pleistocene record of sea-level change, and limestone formation.

Eric has advised many undergraduate students on a wide range of research topics including early marine life (bacteria), oceanography of the Earth's early oceans, analysis of ancient sedimentary basins in the western U.S., northern Canada, South America and Australia, lead contamination in Wisconsin lakes, and the evolution of Canadian alpine lakes.  He is currently collaborating on research with colleagues in Western Australia, Canada and South America.

He received his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder, was a visiting scientist at the USGS in Denver (isotope geochemist) and Texaco in Houston (petroleum geologist).  Eric completed a post-doctoral research fellowship (sedimentology, stratigraphy and sedimentary geochemistry) at Queen’s University in Ontario, and then was appointed to the Geology faculty at Queen’s University before coming to UW Oshkosh. He is an adjunct faculty member at Queen’s and Acadia Universities in Canada where he co-advises graduate students.

Dr. William N. Mode
Bill’s research on glacial geology, palynology, and climatic change has taken him to Baffin Island, Alaska, Russia, and the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The glacial geology of Wisconsin is also of interest as he is a native of Wisconsin. Currently he is collaborating with Dr. Thomas Hooyer, UW-Milwaukee, and geologists at the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey on mapping the Fox River basin.

Bill admits that research on surficial geology is actually easier to do in arctic areas than in Wisconsin, because the trees don't get in the way in the Arctic. While he is Department Chair, Glacial Geology, Geomorphology, and Honors Geology are his teaching responsibilities. Bill's Ph.D. is from the University of Colorado, and he spent one year at Ohio State University as a post-doctoral fellow before coming to Oshkosh.

Maureen A. Muldoon
Dr. Muldoon teaches three hydrogeology courses (Physical, Chemical and Field Methods), as well as Environmental Geology. She also teaches a geology field trip to the Colorado Plateau and an Environmental Studies field course in Belize.

Maureen’s research focuses on applied groundwater questions throughout Wisconsin and all of her projects at UW-Oshkosh have involved undergraduate research assistants. Her research includes investigation of groundwater quality and flow in carbonate rocks, relationship between carbonate stratigraphy and hydraulic properties, land-use impacts on groundwater quality, and delineation of wellhead protection zones in fractured rock.

Dr. Muldoon is a licensed professional geologist and hydrologist in Wisconsin and she occasionally consults on projects that address the hydrogeology of fractured carbonate aquifers. Before joining the staff at UW Oshkosh, she worked as a hydrogeologist with the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey for almost 11 years where she conducted groundwater research throughout Wisconsin, worked with several counties on inventories of their groundwater resources, and taught several short courses.

Maureen received her A.B. degree from Washington University in St. Louis and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Dr. Timothy S. Paulsen
Tim teaches Structural Geology and Tectonics, Geophysics and Geotectonics, Introduction to Field Methods, Applied Field Methods, and Field Geology (i.e., field camp in Park City, Utah). Tim is a structural geologist and his research focuses on understanding mountain building in North America, India, and Antarctica. Prior to joining the Geology Department faculty in the fall of 1999, he did a three-year post-doctoral study at the Byrd Polar Research Center at The Ohio State University. Tim received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1997, where he studied fold-thrust belt deformation in the Wasatch Range of Utah. He is currently working with students on projects focused on understanding the structural evolution of Antarctica and the North America Cordillera.

Dr. Joseph Peterson
Dr. Peterson teaches Evolution of Earth, Paleontology, and Stratigraphy and Basin Analysis. He also teaches a field course in Utah that involves looking at Mesozoic stratigraphy and paleontology.

Joe’s research includes vertebrate paleontology and vertebrate taphonomy, focusing specifically on Late Cretaceous dinosaurs such as tyrannosaurs and pachycephalosaurs. He is also investigating the role of microorganisms in the preservation of soft tissues in dinosaur fossils.

Joe received his B.S. in Geology from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, IL, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Geology from Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, IL.

Tom Suszek
Tom joined the UW Oshkosh Department of Geology as their Instrumentation Specialist in 2000. He has been involved in procuring and cataloguing rock and mineral specimens, maintenance of field equipment, rock preparation equipment and laboratory instruments, creating new hall displays, and establishing EPA compliance throughout Harrington Hall. In addition, Tom trains and supervises students as tutors, proctors, and outreach presenters, and in the use of instruments and laboratories. He is also part of the permanent summer Field Camp faculty.

Tom is a native of Wisconsin and a UW Oshkosh geology Alum. He received his M.S. degree from the University of Minnesota-Duluth with emphasis in sedimentary and economic geology. Tom has been involved in exploration for precious and base metals throughout the upper great lakes region for nearly 15 years. His area of expertise is in the recognition of environments of deposition conductive to the formation of sediment-hosted stratiform copper deposits, and sedimentary and volcanic rocks associated with intracontinental rifting.

Dr. Jennifer Wenner
Dr. Wenner teaches physical geology, mineralogy, and igneous and metamorphic petrology. She also teaches field courses in Hawaii focused on the evolution of volcanoes from active to extinct, and in Death Valley and the Sierra Nevada focused on the geologic history of the American West. Jen holds a B.A. from Carleton College (1992) and a Ph.D. from Boston University (2001).

Jen is an igneous petrologist and geochemist by training and her research is focused on the evolution of arcs. She has studied ophiolites (and archaeology) in Greece, intermediate rocks from Argentina, high-silica granites in the Sierra Nevada and is currently working with primitive mafic rocks in the Cascades. In addition to her geologic
interests, Jen also pursues her passion for teaching through development of faculty and student resources focused on increased quantitative learning in introductory geoscience courses. In the past 12 years, dozens of students actively participated in projects that have included field work in remote places, geochemical and isotopic analysis, petrographic investigations, and studies in geoscience education. Each student has designed his or her project, received funding through GSA, Sigma Xi and/or UW Oshkosh, and presented results at national or regional meetings.


TEACHING ACADEMIC STAFF
Most years there are one or more people on the staff of the Geology Department who are here for only one to three years. These people may be hired to teach laboratories in the freshman courses or may be filling in for faculty who have a sabbatical leave. The Department values them highly because of the job they perform,and because they provide new ideas and insights.

Christie Demosthenous
This is Christie's 15th year with the UW Oshkosh Department of Geology. Her teaching responsibilities currently include labs and lecture for both Environmental Geology and Physical Geology.

She received an AB in Geology from Colgate University and an MS in Geology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she specialized in clay mineralogy.

Her research at Illinois focused on determining the alteration history of volcanic rocks from the island of Ischia in Italy. Christie served as a teaching assistant for a variety of geology classes while at the University of Illinois and Colgate University. Prior to coming to Oshkosh, she worked at the Byrd Polar Research Center at The Ohio State University using radar imagery to study the structural architecture of the Transantarctic Mountains and the distribution of volcanic cones in Antarctica.


SUPPORT STAFF 

The Department could not function without the support of Jane Luker, Academic Department Associate. Most geology majors will get to know Jane for one reason or another--removing a stop so you can register, borrowing a key to get into a lab, or just stopping in for a cookie.

Diane Lloyd is the new custodian for Harrington Hall.  She worked in Halsey before moving to Harrington.  She thinks she might miss the air conditioning during summer.


EMERITI FACULTY 

Dr. C.W. Fetter
Dr. C. W. Fetter, Jr. passed away on September 10, 2011. His many contributions to this department and the profession are memorialized by the C. W. Fetter Endowed Research Fund for undergraduate geology research which he created several years ago. Dr. Fetter served on the UW Oshkosh faculty for 27 years from 1971 to 1998, serving as Department Chair from 1979 to 1981 and from 1984 to 1996. He was named a John McNaughton Rosebush Professor in 1983. Dr. Fetter taught environmental geology, hydrogeology, engineering geology, and glacial geology and authored several hydrogeology textbooks. In recognition of his important contributions in the field of hydrogeology, he received the Excellence in Science and Engineering Award in 1996 and the Life Member Award in 2006, both from the National Ground Water Association. In 1998 the Wisconsin Ground Water Association awarded him their Distinguished Professional Award.

Dr. Norris W. Jones
After 32 years of teaching Physical Geology, Optical Mineralogy, X-Ray Mineralogy, Petrology, and sundry other courses, Professor Jones retired at the end of Spring Semester, 2000.  His golf game reportedly has improved ever since, though he thinks the reporters must have been watching someone else.

Dr. Jones’s eighth edition of his popular Laboratory Manual for Physical Geology, co-authored with his son Charles (U. of Pittsburgh), was published by McGraw-Hill in early 2012. We hope his lab manual will continue to be available because our geology labs use it.

Dr. Gene L. LaBerge
Although he turned 81 in March, Dr. LaBerge keeps busy leading field trips, giving talks to mineral clubs, writing articles, and keeping up with grandchildren.

After several years of work, Gene and Dr. George Robinson, curator of the Seaman Mineral Museum at Michigan Technological University have completed a book on “Minerals in the Iron Ores of the Lake Superior Region.”  The book is approximately 80 pages long with over 100 color photographs of minerals, maps and diagrams.  It will be published by the Seaman Museum Society, and will come out this fall.

Gene and Dr. Joanne Kluessendorf, manager of the Weis Earth Science Museum at the UW-Fox Valley campus in Menasha have also completed a 25-page booklet entitled, “A Story Written in Stone; The Geologic history of Central Wisconsin.”  The project is for students and other visitors to the geological exhibit at the Mead Wildlife Refuge in central Wisconsin.  The exhibit is a ring of boulders of the various rock types on which the geologic history is based.

There was one major change in Gene’s life in 2013.  After 40 years of collecting minerals from around the world, Gene sold his collection last summer – it was a tough decision to make.  However, before the sale he had each of his three daughters each select about 80-90 specimens that they liked best.  Happily, Gene found that they all had a “good eye” for the better minerals.  However the “mineral room” in the basement certainly looks barren without the minerals on display.  To avoid “withdrawal pains,” he intends to continue collecting on a smaller scale.

Related with the disposal of this mineral collection, he is donating a suite of mineral specimens from Kennecott Copper Company’s Flambeau Mine to Ladysmith, Wisconsin (Gene’s hometown).  The collection will be part of an historical memorial to the mine which operated from 1993-1997.

Sally and I continue to enjoy traveling to visit our children and grandchildren.  Next year we plan to travel to Norway to visit Rene and her family.  Laura still lives in Stamford, CT, and Michelle lives in Oshkosh.                 

Dr. Thomas S. Laudon
Sue and Tom continue to enjoy being retired, mainly at their homes on Picacho Hills Golf Course in Las Cruces, New Mexico in the winter, and on Lake Winnebago in Oshkosh the rest of the year. Their travels consist mostly of visits to their children and their families, with stops along the way to visit with old friends. They are always delighted when old friends stop in to visit with them, and go for a boat ride or a round of golf.

Dr. James W. McKee
Professor McKee, who retired in 1996, continues his geological research in Mexico while beginning a new career as a farmer. Before he retired he taught Paleontology and Stratigraphy, led several Spring Field Trips to Mexico, and taught field camp with Dr. Laudon for many years. 

Research in Mexico ended in 2005 with GSA Special Paper 393, and publications therein. Further reseach dropped due to knees and brain becoming unserviceable; steers all sold or eaten; growing beans more work than I had planned; I quit selling erratics in favor of becoming one. 

Dr. Brian K. McKnight
Professor McKnight retired in 1999. He used to teach honors geology, structural geology, sedimentology, and oceanography.

After retiring from the University, Brian has been an owner and wine buyer for two wine stores, one in Oshkosh and the other in Appleton under the name of McKnight & Carlson. This has taken him to Australia, New Zealand, France, Italy and Germany as well as numerous U.S. locations to taste and learn about wine.  He has sold his interest in McKnight & Carlson and has retired from the wine business. Brian lost his wife, Carole, in June 2010, after a sixteen year battle with cancer.

Brian is writing stories that are being published in his hometown newspaper. They are mostly about growing up in a "Huckleberry Finn" existence in the Kickapoo River Valley but in the future will include articles about the local geology of Southwestern Wisconsin.


REQUIREMENTS FOR A B.S. DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN GEOLOGY

There are three emphases in the Geology major:  (1) Professional Emphasis in Geology; (2) Professional Emphasis in Hydrogeology; and (3) Liberal Arts Emphasis.  Students who wish to pursue a double major (e.g., Geology and Biology) may want to consider formulating an Individually Planned Major and should consult with the Department Chairperson. Students can pursue either a B.S. or a B.A. degree in Geology. The information that follows is designed for a B.S. degree.

All emphases require completion of the core courses (Geology 102, 110, or 150; 109; 205; and 206) as well as a writing emphasis course (311, 320, or 335).

Many geology courses have prerequisites and you should pay attention to these (See" Prerequisites" section.) Note that Chemistry, 32-105 must be taken before or concurrently with Mineralogy, 51-205, and that chemistry courses have math prerequisites.

Many geology courses are offered beyond the required ones listed below. Geology students should consider taking some of those courses, especially 444 (Research in Geology) and 446 (Independent Study), to gain research experience, and 445 (Geology Internship), to gain pre-professional experience.


PROFESSIONAL EMPHASIS IN GEOLOGY

This emphasis stresses courses traditionally taken in an undergraduate major in Geology. 
It is designed for students who plan graduate study in Geology or who will ultimately seek
professional employment in a mineral or energy resource field.


Geology Requirements (Professional Emphasis in Geology)
Credits
*Physical Geology, 51-102 OR Honors: Geology, 51-110
          OR Environmental Geology, 51-150
4-5
Evolution of the Earth, 51-109
4
Mineralogy, 51-205
4
Lithology, 51-206
4
Paleontology, 51-309
3
Sedimentology, 51-314 
3
Geophysics & Geotectonics, 51-326
              OR Geochemistry, 51-369
3
Structural Geology & Tectonics, 51-331
3
Field Geology, 51-344 or equivalent
6
Two of the following:   
Petrology, 51-308; Stratigraphy & Basin Analysis, 51-311; Geomorphology, 51-320; 
Mineral Deposits, 51-322; Physical Hydrogeology, 51-365; Geophysics & Geotectonics, 51-326 OR Geochemistry, 51-369  
6
   Total Credits in Geology 
40-41

*51-102 OR 51-110 is recommended.

Requirements Outside Geology  
Credits
1.  Chemistry 32-105 and 32-106
10
2.  Physics/Astronomy 82-107 and 82-108                                
        OR Physics/Astronomy 82-109 and 82-110 (recommended)

10
3.  Calculus, 67-171 and 67-172
8
4.  Computer Science 34-142 OR 34-221, OR Geography        
        50-371 OR 50-391 OR 50-471, OR Mathematics 67-201
3 or 4

Electives

For students who would like to take additional courses in science or math, these are recommended.

1.  Biology 26-105, 26-230 OR 26-231

2.  Chemistry, 32-221

3.  Mathematics 67-273 OR 67-301


PROFESSIONAL EMPHASIS IN HYDROGEOLOGY

This emphasis is designed to prepare students for graduate studies in Hydrogeology, Environmental Science, Environmental Geology, or Water Resources Management programs. The curriculum is also suitable for students seeking employment in these areas without a graduate degree. At present, there are employment opportunities for hydrogeologists with a Bachelor's degree.  However, because employment conditions change, we urge students to seriously consider graduate studies before beginning a career in this area.

Geology Requirements (Professional Emphasis in Hydrogeology)
Credits
Physical Geology, 51-102 OR Honors: Geology, 51-110
        OR Environmental Geology, 51-150
4-5
Evolution of the Earth, 51-109
4
Mineralogy, 51-205
4
Lithology, 51-206 
4
Sedimentology, 51-314 
3
Geomorphology, 51-320 OR Glacial Geology, 51-335
3

Geophysics & Geotectonics, 51-326 OR Geochemistry, 51-369
3

Structural Geology & Tectonics, 51-331
3
Physical Hydrogeology, 31-365  
3
Chemical Hydrogeology, 31-366
3
Field Geology, 51-344 or equivalent 
6
   Total Credits in Geology 
40-41

Requirements Outside Geology
Credits
1.  Chemistry 32-105 and 32-106
10
2.  Physics/Astronomy 82-107 and 82-108 OR 82-109 and 82-110 (recommended)
10
3.  Calculus, 67-171 and 67-172  
8

4.  Computer Science 34-142 OR 34-221, OR Geography 50-371 OR 50-391 OR
        50- 471, OR Mathematics 67-201

3 or 4

Electives  (Professional Emphasis in Hydrogeology)

For students who would like to take additional courses in related areas, these are recommended.
 1.  Geology 370 & 371 (Field Methods in Hydrogeology I & II)
*
2.  Economics 36-206 and 36-207
 3.  Mathematics 67-273, 67-301, 67-371
 4.  Biology 26-105, 26-106, 26-233
 5.  Chemistry 32-221, 32-235, 32-320, 32-347
                                                  
* These courses satisfy General Education requirements.


LIBERAL ARTS EMPHASIS IN GEOLOGY

This emphasis is for students who may not plan to work as geologists or who have goals that are not compatible with the other emphases.

Geology Requirements  (Liberal Arts Emphasis)
 Credits
Physical Geology, 51-102 OR Honors Geology, 51-110 OR 
    Environmental Geology, 51-150
4-5
Evolution of the Earth, 51-109 
4
Mineralogy, 51-205
4
Lithology, 51-206
4
Electives in Geology
18
   Total Credits in Geology 
34-35

Requirements Outside Geology
Two semesters of Chemistry (105 and 106) or Physics/Astronomy (107 and 108 or 109 and 110) are required. Because Chemistry 105 is a pre- or co-requisite for Mineralogy (Geology 205), Chemistry is recommended.
10

REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN SECONDARY EARTH SCIENCE EDUCATION

Students who want to teach Earth Science in middle and high school should complete the requirements for this major. These requirements are intended to prepare you to teach concepts from astronomy and climatology or meteorology, as well as geology.

Earth Science majors should consult the College of Education and Human Services (COEHS) in their freshman year and frequently thereafter in order to plan their schooling as efficiently as possible. The requirements in COEHS are complex and changeable and are best explained by a COEHS advisor.

To be able to teach in Wisconsin, you must be admitted to the COEHS and complete the requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Education (BSE) and for licensure. Admission to the COEHS can be sought after completing 40 credits, but most students will have many more than this. Admission then occurs in two steps, each with its own GPA and other requirements.  
Licensure in Secondary Education requires completion of the requirements for the BSE plus the major in Earth Science and a minor.

The BSE requires some specific General Education courses as well as specific education courses. You should consult the Undergraduate Bulletin and the COEHS advisor for details.        


Geology Requirements   (Secondary Earth Science)
Credits
Environmental Geology, 51-150
4
Evolution of the Earth, 51-109
4
Mineralogy, 51-205
4
Lithology, 51-206
4
Paleontology, 51-309
3
Geomorphology, 51-320
  OR Glacial Geology, 51-335
3
Oceanography, 51-328
3
Field Geology, 51-344 OR equivalent
6
  Total Credits in Geology
31

Other Science and Math Requirements
1.  Physics/Astronomy 82-103
4
2.  Geography 50-121
4
3.  Mathematics 67-108 OR 67-104
3-5
4.  Two semesters of Biology, Chemistry, OR Physics   
      (Note: Chemistry, 32-105 is a prerequisite for Mineralogy, 51-205.)
8-10

Education Requirements

Education courses are specified by the College of Education and Human Services.  See the University Bulletin.


Prerequisites

Note that Structural Geology & Tectonics, 51-331, is a prerequisite for Field Geology (51-344).


RECOMMENDED FLOW SCHEMES FOR MAJORS IN GEOLOGY

PREREQUISITES
Planning your class schedule in advance is important. One reason for planning in advance is that some junior-senior courses are only offered every other year. Further, note the following prerequisites of chemistry, math, physics, or computer science:
       
Geology Course Prerequisite
Mineralogy, 51-205 Chemistry 32-105 (or co-requisite)
Structural Geology & Tectonics, 51-331 Math 67-106 OR 67-108
Physical Hydrogeology, 51-365 Math 67-106 OR 67-108
Geochemistry, 51-369 Chemistry 32-106

COURSE SCHEDULING
Because the Department of Geology is a relatively small program, several upper-level courses are taught every other year. When you are planning your class schedule, it is important to anticipate when a course will be taught. The list that follows is our current plan for offering geology courses for the next two years.

NOTE: Class schedules are tentative and may change due to availability of faculty and number of students who enroll.

Fall 2012

Geology-
205, Mineralogy
309, Paleontology
314, Sedimentology
320, Geomorphology
369, Geochemistry
 

Spring 2013

Geology-
206, Lithology
308, Petrology
311, Stratigraphy & Basin Analysis
315, Sedimentary Petrology
328, Oceanography
331, Structural Geology & Tectonics
342, Applied Geologic Field Methods (Spring Interim) (Tentative)


Summer 2013

Geology-
344, Field Geology-Utah
360, Field Course in Geology - Yellowstone

Fall 2013

Geology-
205, Mineralogy
309, Paleontology
314, Sedimentology
322, Mineral Deposits

335, Glacial Geology
365, Physical Hydrogeology
370, Field Hydrogeology I


Spring 2014

Geology-
140, Intro. to Geologic Field Methods
206, Lithology
326, Geophysics & Geotectonics
328, Oceanography
331, Structural Geology & Tectonics
360, Field Course in Geology
366, Chemical Hydrogeology
371, Field Hydrogeology II


Summer 2014

Geology-
344, Field Geology - Utah
360, Field Course in Geology - Bermuda




Please note that the following four-year plans are designed for the general education requirements that ended in Spring Semester, 2013. If you are an entering student in Fall Semester, 2014, the new University Studies Program (USP) requirements will apply.

Recommended Four-Year Plan for B.S. Degree in Geology: Professional Emphases in Geology and in Hydrogeology

Courses 
Credits

FRESHMAN YEAR                                                                                                             

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 102 (Physical Geology) OR 150 (Environmental Geology)
            (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB
4
Chemistry 105 (General Chemistry) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB)
5
English 101 (College English I) or 188 (WBIS) (GEN ED)    
3
Math 104 (College Algebra) (GEN ED: MATHEMATICS)
3
History course (GEN ED: SOCIAL SCIENCE)
3
TOTAL
18
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 109 (Evolution of the Earth) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB
4
Geology 140 (Intro to Geologic Field Methods)
1
Chemistry 106 (General Chemistry) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB) 
5
Math 106  (Trigonometry) (GEN ED: MATHEMATICS)
2
Humanities course (GEN ED)
3
Geology 360 (Field Course in Geology) (Interim)
2
TOTAL
17


SOPHOMORE YEAR

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 205 (Mineralogy)
4
Mathematics 171 (Calculus I) (GEN ED: MATHEMATICS)
4
Computer Science 142 or 221; OR Geography 371, 391, or 471; OR Mathematics 201 
3 or 4
Communication 111 (Fundamentals of Speech Communication) (GEN ED)
3
Social Science course (GEN ED) 
3
TOTAL
17 or 18
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 206 (Lithology) 
4
Mathematics 172 (Calculus II) 
4
English 318 (Advanced Comp: Writing About the Sciences)
3
Non-Western Culture & Social Science course (GEN EDs: one course can fulfill both)
3
English Literature course (GEN EDs: one course can fulfill both Humanities and Ethnic Studies
3
TOTAL
17


Recommended Four-Year Plan for B.S. Degree in Geology: Professional Emphasis in Geology


JUNIOR YEAR

FALL SEMESTER
Geology 309 (Paleontology)
3
Geology 314 (Sedimentology)
3
Geology 320 (Geomorphology) OR 322 (Mineral Deposits) OR
365 (Physical Hydrogeology) OR 369 (Geochemistry)
3
Physics/Astronomy 107 OR 109 (General Physics)
5
Geology 446 (Independent Study) or 444 (Research in Geology)
3
TOTAL
17
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 331 (Structural Geology & Tectonics)
3
Geology 360 (Field Course in Geology)
2
Physics/Astronomy 108 OR 110 (General Physics)
5
Humanities course (GEN ED)
3
Physical Education 105 (The Active Lifestyle) (GEN ED)
2
Geology 342 (Applied Geologic Field Methods) (Interim)
3
TOTAL
18
 
SUMMER SEMESTER
Geology 344 (Field Geology)
6


SENIOR YEAR

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 320 (Geomorphology) OR 322 (Mineral Deposits) OR 333 (Advanced Mineralogy) OR 365 (Physical Hydrogeology) OR 369 (Geochemistry)
3
Humanities course (GEN ED)
3
Geology 446 (Independent Study) or 444 (Research in Geology)
3
Elective
3
TOTAL
12
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 308 (Petrology) OR 311 (Stratigraphy & Basin Analysis)
3
Social Science course (GEN ED)
3
Geology 446 (Independent Study) or 444 (Research in Geology
3
Elective  
3
TOTAL
12


Recommended Four-Year Plan for B.S. Degree in Geology: Professional Emphasis in Hydrogeology

JUNIOR YEAR

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 314 (Sedimentology)
3
Geology 320 (Geomorphology) OR 335 (Glacial Geology) 
3
Geology 365 (Physical Hydrogeology)
3
Geology 369 (Geochemistry)
3
Geology 370 (Field Methods in Hydrogeology I)
2
Physics/Astronomy 107 OR 109 (General Physics)
5
TOTAL
19
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 331 (Structural Geology & Tectonics) OR 326 (Geophysics & Geotectonics)
3
Geology 366 (Chemical Hydrogeology)
3
Geology 371 (Field Hydrogeology II) (Interim)
1
Physics/Astronomy 108 OR 110 (General Physics)
5
Humanities course (GEN ED)
3
TOTAL
15
 
SUMMER SEMESTER
Geology 344 (Field Geology)
6


SENIOR YEAR

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 320 (Geomorphology)
3
Geology 369 (Geochemistry)
3
Humanities course (GEN ED)
3
Geology 446 (Independent Study) or 444 (Research in Geology)
3
Physical Education 105 (The Active Lifestyle) (GEN ED)
2
Elective
3
TOTAL
17
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 326 (Geophysics & Geotectonics)
3
Social Science course (GEN ED)
3
Geology 446 (Independent Study) or 444 (Research in Geology)
3
Electives
6
TOTAL
15


Recommended Four-Year Plan for B.S. Degree in Geology: Liberal Arts Emphasis

FRESHMAN YEAR

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 102 (Physical Geology) OR 150 (Environmental Geology) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB)
4
Chemistry 105 (General Chemistry) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB)
5
English 101 (College English I) or 188 (WBIS) (GEN ED)
3
Math 104 (College Algebra) (GEN ED: MATHEMATICS)
3
History course (GEN ED: SOCIAL SCIENCE)
3
TOTAL
18
   
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 109 (Evolution of the Earth) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB)
4
Geology 140 (Intro to Geologic Field Methods)
1
Chemistry 106 (General Chemistry) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB)
5
Math 106  (Trigonometry) (GEN ED: MATHEMATICS)
2
Humanities course (GEN ED)
3
Geology 360 (Field Course in Geology) (Interim)
2
TOTAL 
17


SOPHOMORE YEAR

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 205 (Mineralogy)
4
Communication 111 (Fundamentals of Speech Communication) (GEN ED)
3
Physical Education 105 (The Active Lifestyle) (GEN ED)
2
Social Science course (GEN ED)
3
Math 201 (Applied Statistics) (GEN ED: MATHEMATICS)
3
TOTAL 
15
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 206 (Lithology) 
4
English 318 (Advanced Comp: Writing About the Sciences) 
3
Non-Western Culture & Social Science course (GEN EDs: one course can fulfill both)  
3
English Literature course (GEN EDs: one course can fulfill both Humanities and Ethnic Studies)
3
Elective
3
Geology 342 (Applied Geologic Field Methods) (Interim)
2
TOTAL
18


Recommended Four-Year Plan for B.S. Degree in Geology: Liberal Arts Emphasis

JUNIOR YEAR

FALL SEMESTER
Geology 309 (Paleontology)
3
Geology 314 (Sedimentology)
3
Geology 365 (Physical Hydrogeology)
3
Geology 446 (Independent Study) or 444 (Research in Geology)
3
Electives
6
TOTAL
18
 
SPRING SEMESTER
3
Geology 331 (Structural Geology & Tectonics)
3
Geology 366 (Chemical Hydrogeology)
3
Humanities course (GEN ED)
6
Electives
15
TOTAL
 
SUMMER SEMESTER
Geology 344 (Field Geology)
6


SENIOR YEAR

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 309 (Paleontology) 
3
Geology 320 (Geomorphology)
3
Geology 369 (Geochemistry) 
3
Humanities course (GEN ED)
3
Geology 446 (Independent Study) or 444 (Research in Geology)
3
Elective
3
TOTAL 
18
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Social Science course (GEN ED)
3
Geology 446 (Independent Study) or 444 (Research in Geology)
3
Electives
9
TOTAL
15


Recommended Four-Year Plan for B.S. Degree in Secondary Education: Earth Science

FRESHMAN YEAR

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 150 (Environmental Geology) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB)
4
Chemistry 105 (General Chemistry) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB)
5
English 188 (WBIS) (GEN ED)
3
Math 104 (College Algebra) (GEN ED: MATHEMATICS)
3
TOTAL
15
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 109 (Evolution of the Earth) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB)
4
Chemistry 106 (General Chemistry) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB) 
5
Math 106  (Trigonometry) (GEN ED: MATHEMATICS)
2
Communication 111 (Fundamentals of Speech Communciation) (GEN ED) 
3
Geology 360 (Field Course in Geology) (Interim)
2
TOTAL
16


SOPHOMORE YEAR

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 205 (Mineralogy)
4
Communications 111 (Fundamentals of Speech Communication( (GEN ED)
3
Physical Education 105 (The Active Lifestyle) (GEN ED)
2
Social Science course (GEN ED)
3
Physics/Astronomy 103 (The Solar System)
4
TOTAL
16
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 206 (Lithology)
4
Non-Western Culture & Social Science course (GEN EDs: one course can fulfill both)
3
English Literature course (GEN ED: HUMANITIES)
3
Geography 121 (Weather and Climate)
4
Humanities course (GEN ED)
3
TOTAL
17


Recommended Four-Year Plan for B.S. Degree in Secondary Education: Earth Science

JUNIOR YEAR

FALL SEMESTER  
Geology 309 (Paleontology)
3
Geology 314 (Sedimentology)
3
Geology 335 (Glacial Geology) or Geomorphology (320)
3
Educational Foundations 235 (Child and Adolescent Development)
3
Educational Leadership 205 (Introduction to Computers in Education)
1
Biology 104 (Ecosphere in Crisis) or 105 (Biological Concepts - Unity) (GEN ED: NAT SCI LAB)
4
TOTAL
17
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Geology 328 (Oceanography)
3
Geology 331 (Structural Geology & Tectonics)
3
Educational Foundations 380 (Educational Psychology)
3
Secondary Education 201 (Individual, School, and Society)
3
English 318 (Advanced Comp: Writing About the Sciences) (GEN ED)
3
Special Education 352 (Children & Youth with Disabilities in General Education)
3
TOTAL          
18
 
SUMMER SEMESTER
Geology 344 (Field Geology) 
6


SENIOR YEAR

FALL SEMESTER
Secondary Education 339 (Teaching of Science)
3
Secondary Education 432 (Middle School Education) 
2
Educational Foundations 406 (Foundations of American Education)
3
Educational Leadership 325 (Instructional Technology)
3
Reading 435 (Adolescent Literacy Methods)
4
TOTAL
15
 
SPRING SEMESTER
Secondary Education 340 (Teaching of Science II)
3
Secondary Education 358 (Clinical)
3
Educational Foundations 408 (Foundations of American Education)
4
History 101, 102, 201, or 202 (GEN ED: SOCIAL SCIENCE)
3
TOTAL
13


FIFTH YEAR

FALL SEMESTER
Student Teaching




U
NDERGRADUATE COURSE OFFERINGS IN GEOLOGY


Course Number Course Name
Credit
Offerings
51-102 Physical Geology
4
Every semester
51-109 Evolution of the Earth
4
Every semester
51-110 Honors: Geology
5
Spring
51-140 Introduction to Field Methods
1
Spring (odd years)
51-150 Environmental Geology
4
Every semester
51-205 Mineralogy
4
Fall
51-206 Lithology
4
Spring
51-306 X-ray Mineralogy
1
(As scheduled.)
51-308 Petrology
3
Spring (odd years)
51-309 Paleontology
3
Fall
51-311 Stratigraphy & Basin Analysis
3
Spring (odd years)
51-314 Sedimentology
3
Fall
51-315 Sedimentary Petrology
1
Spring (odd years)
51-320 Geomorphology
3
Fall (even years)
51-322 Mineral Deposits
3
Fall (odd years)
51-326 Geophysics & Geotectonics
3
Spring (even years)
51-328 Oceanography
3
Spring
51-331 Structural Geology & Tectonics
3
Spring
51-333 Advanced Mineralogy
3
Fall (even years)
51-335 Glacial Geology
3
Fall (odd years)
51-342 Applied Geologic Field Methods
2
Spring Interim (odd years)
51-344 Field Geology
6
Summer
51-360 Field Course in Geology
2
Fall Interim, Spring Break, Spring Interim, Summer
51-365 Physical Hydrogeology
3
Fall (odd years)
51-366 Chemical Hydrogeology
3
Spring (even years)
51-369 Geochemistry
3
Fall (even years)
51-370 Field Methods in Hydrogeology I
2
Fall (odd years)
51-371 Field Methods in Hydrogeology II
1
Spring III (even years)
51-444 Research in Geology
1-3
Every semester
51-445 Geology Internship
1-3
Every semester
51-446 Independent Study
1-3
Every semester
51-456 Related Readings
1-3
Every semester
51-460 Topics in Geology
1-3
(As scheduled.)
51-474 Honors: Thesis
1-6
Every semester



WHERE DO I GO FROM HERE?

Even though you may be just beginning your geology studies, now is the time to start thinking about what you will do after graduation. If you are planning a career in geology and hope to advance in the profession, you should seriously consider going to graduate school. Graduates from our department have been admitted to graduate programs in many schools, including some of the most prestigious ones. In order to get into a graduate program, you have to apply to a particular school, and it must accept your application. Graduate schools consider a number of things in determining whether they will accept an applicant. One of the more important considerations is the grade point average that you have earned as an undergraduate at Oshkosh.  In general, a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B) is necessary to gain admission to a graduate program. This means that you must be conscientious and consistent in your approach to your studies. Some graduate schools and many prospective employers also may look at the number of courses that you started, but did not complete. Such courses are indicated on your transcript with a W for Withdrawal. Too many withdrawals suggest that you give up easily when the going gets difficult. Most graduate schools require an undergraduate major in geology or a related science, as well as specific courses in supporting sciences. Most also require that you complete a summer field course in geology.

One thing that many students do not realize is that graduate schools ask for a minimum of 3 letters of recommendation from professors. In order for a professor to write a fair assessment of your abilities, they need to know you.  Talk to them.  Go on field trips. If you don't make an effort to get to know your faculty, then we are not going to know enough about you to write a good letter of recommendation. Faculty members are available to students during the day and on some evening social occasions.

Many of our better students undertake research projects during their junior or senior years. These projects are extremely valuable to have on your record when you apply for admission to a graduate school. A number of our students have done a research project and then given a presentation of the information at a professional meeting. While that is not going to make up for a C average, it may well be the determining factor in receiving financial aid for graduate school. Most of our graduates with a good grade point average, a B+ or better, get partial or full financial aid to attend a graduate school. This may take the form of a teaching or research assistantship from the graduate school, or it could be a fellowship or grant. In most cases, there is no financial reason why a good geology graduate should not attend graduate school.

You should start thinking about where you want to go to graduate school in your junior year. Consultation with members of the faculty is the first step. Very often they know of specific programs and perhaps even what kind of financial aids might be available at certain schools. You should write directly to six or more graduate schools requesting information.
Another very useful source of information is the book, Directory of Geoscience Departments published by the American Geosciences Institute. It is available for short-term loan in the Department Office. It gives the name, address (snail-mail and e-mail), phone and FAX numbers, and degrees offered of nearly all schools in North America that offer more than a few courses in geology. Faculty and their specialties are also listed.

You will also need to take the Graduate Record Examination. Most graduate schools require both the verbal and quantitative aptitude parts of the Graduate Record Exam, and many also require the Advanced Test in Geology. It is especially important that you do well on the verbal and quantitative aptitude tests. You can begin preparing for the verbal test immediately by getting into the habit of reading good books for recreation. Look up words you don't know, build your vocabulary and general reading skills. Take writing and literature courses beyond those required. There are published study guides which help prepare you for the GRE. Use them. There is a copy of GRE Geology Test, published by the GRE Board, that you can look at in the Department office. It will give you an idea of the kinds of geology questions asked on the GRE. In addition, you may want to visit the GRE Web site at www.gre.org/index.html for information about the exam, including sample questions. The GRE should be taken early in the
Fall of your senior year so that you can have your scores sent to graduate schools along with your application, which should be submitted during December and January. While it is possible to apply much later in the year, financial aid may already be committed.

Ultimately, whether or not you get into a graduate school of your choice depends upon you-the grades you have earned, courses taken, score on the Graduate Record Exam, and how favorably you impressed the faculty members here who will be providing written evaluations of your abilities to the graduate school. Remember, the faculty is on your side, and we will do all we can to help you further your education or get a job.

If you are not thinking about graduate school, then you're probably going to try to find a job. Many of our graduates have been successful in finding employment immediately upon graduation.  However, it is not easy. You have to be prepared to move, possibly anywhere in the United States. Some of our graduates have accepted the challenge of an overseas position.  
Successful job seekers have to do much of the looking on their own.  The geology faculty may be able to help you and give you some leads, but for the most part you will need to do a lot of writing, telephoning, or traveling.  Names and addresses of some employers of geologists, career descriptions, and a list of UW Oshkosh graduates with geology jobs in Wisconsin are available in the Geology Department Office.  dvertisements for jobs are a regular feature in several magazines available in the Geology Department.  
             

There is a lot of information about a career in geoscience and job availability on the World-Wide Web.  You may want to try the following for career information:  

GRADUATE SCHOOLS ATTENDED BY
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-OSHKOSH GEOLOGY GRADUATES

UW-Green Bay
UW-Madison
UW-Milwaukee
Acadia University, Nova Scotia
University of Alabama
University of Alaska-Fairbanks
Arizona State University
University of Arizona
Northern Arizona University
Baylor University
Bowling Green State University
Brigham Young University
University of California-Berkeley
University of California-Davis
University of California-Los Angeles
University of Chicago
Colorado School of Mines
University of Colorado
University of Delaware
Emporia State University
University of Florida
Florida State University
Georgia Tech
University of Georgia-Athens

University of Idaho
Northern Illinois University
Southern Illinois University
Indiana State University
University of Iowa
Iowa State University
The Johns Hopkins University
University of Kansas
University of Kentucky
University of Kentucky at Richmond
Louisiana State University
Southwestern Louisiana State University
University of Maryland
McGill University
University of Miami
University of Michigan
Michigan State University
Michigan Technological University
University of Minnesota-Duluth
University of Missouri-Columbia
University of Missouri-Rolla
Montana State University
New Mexico State University
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
University of Nevada-Las Vegas
University of Nevada-Reno
University of New Orleans
University of North Carolina
Ohio University
Ohio State University

Oregon State University
University of Pittsburgh
Portland State University
Queens University-Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Rice University
University of South Carolina
Stanford University
South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
Sul Ross University
Syracuse University
University of Tennessee
Texas A & M University
University of Texas-Arlington
University of Texas-Austin
University of Utah
Utah State University
University of Vermont
Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Washington State University
University of Washington
Central Washington State University
Eastern Washington State University
Wichita State University
Wright State University