Overview of Human Services Leadership Field Placement

Field placement provides experiential learning in a human services delivery organization. An integral part of the total education process, experiential learning integrates the theory, knowledge, skills and professional behaviors that are concurrently taught in the coursework.

— Adapted from CSHSE (Council for Standards in Human Service Education)

 

Field Experiences

 

Introductory field experience (18-203, 3 credits)

30 service hours (unpaid) experience in a human services setting as a course requirement for the survey course, Introduction to Human Services. The course instructor provides a list of potential placement sites and arranges student placement. While this experience is not graded per se, site evaluations are used for professional development and planning of future placements. This exploratory experience is designed to acquaint students with a human service agency.

 

Internship (18-325, 3 credits)

120 service hours (unpaid) experience in a human service agency.

Placements are arranged through the Human Services Leadership Field Experience Office. Students may not contact agencies directly to arrange their placement. Supervision is provided by faculty members and agency staff. Two supervisory contacts are required with the student, the agency supervisor and the university supervisor including an introductory visit and a mid-term evaluation. Additional supervisory contact, as necessary, may be arranged on a case-by-case basis. Students are required to prepare a work contract outlining their placement plan. This work contract, reviewed during the site visit, includes the student’s goals and objectives, and will direct their activities. Students will be evaluated by their agency supervisor at the mid and end points of the placement. The course component of the internship requires bi-weekly seminar attendance and written coursework. Internship students have been admitted to the Human Services Leadership program. They have completed a minimum of 9 Human Services Leadership credits and 30-hours of (introductory) field experience in a human services agency. They should be able to interact effectively with clients and staff, plan short programs, engage in administrative tasks and do special projects. Students, though, will need support in further developing professional competencies.  Offered Summer (8 week term), Fall, and Spring (14 week terms). 

Advanced Internship (18-420, 3 credits; 18-421, 3 credits;  18-422, 1 credit)

280 service hours of (unpaid) experience in a human service agency.

Placement is arranged by the Human Services Leadership Field Experience Office. Students may not contact agencies directly to arrange their placement although may contact an agency for additional information about a potential placement. Supervision is provided by faculty members and agency staff. Three supervisory contacts are required with the student, the agency supervisor and the university supervisor including an introductory visit and a mid-term evaluation. Additional supervisory contact, as necessary, may be arranged on a case-by-case basis. Students are required to prepare a work contract outlining their placement plan. This work contract, reviewed during the first site visit, includes the student’s goals and objectives, and will direct their activities. Students will be evaluated by their agency supervisor at the mid and end points of the placement. The course component of the internship requires bi-weekly seminar attendance and written coursework. Advanced Internship students have completed their program courses. Human Services Leadership coursework is designed to prepare students to function, with supervision, as an entry level worker.  Offered Summer (8 week term), Fall, and Spring (14 week terms)

 

UW Oshkosh Human Services Program Graduate Competencies


The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Human Services Leadership Program strives to prepare graduates to meet diverse human needs through an interdisciplinary knowledge base. Focus is on prevention and remediation of problems while maintaining a commitment to improving the life quality of those served. Our curriculum incorporates the National Standards in Human Service Education as established by CSHSE.

The Human Service profession promotes successful delivery systems by addressing the effectiveness of accessibility, coordination, accountability, and outcomes in the delivery of services.

 

Skills and Competencies

  • A broad-based awareness of social welfare within a global political-economic context adaptable to diverse audiences and services

  • Able to understand, identify, analyze and respond to existing and emerging social issues and intervention strategies

  • Awareness of how values and personal style interact with Human Service work 

  • Interpersonal skills including listening, interviewing, consulting, presenting, educating, problem-solving, decision making and advocacy in written, oral and electronic communication with colleagues, clients and the community

  • Comprehend various legal implications in the human services field and function within the profession’s ethical guidelines

  • Utilize assessment techniques and strategies for intervention based on an understanding of human systems theory with special emphasis on human behavior and development

  • Knowledge of strategic planning; capable of research; program planning, implementation and evaluation; and grant proposal development

  • Aware of non-profit organizational structure, governance, administration, professional roles, marketing and economic composition

  • An understanding of leadership principles, styles and practices with special emphasis on the non-profit organization and their stakeholders

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