Since its inception as a teacher-training school in 1871, UW Oshkosh has long been recognized as a leader in education. Today, the College of Education and Human Services is proud to be at the forefront of preparing the next generation of professional leaders in education, human services and counseling. More than 225 of our alumni have been recognized with prestigious Herb Kohl Fellowship Awards.

Whether you are considering an undergraduate degree, a graduate degree, professional development opportunities or an additional teaching license, our highly committed faculty and staff, accredited programs and hands-on field experiences will help you achieve your goals. Plus, our ongoing outreach activities with city and rural school districts ensure we remain in tune with the needs of today’s administrators and teachers.

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Seeds of Inclusion Keynote Advises Future Educators

Seeds of Inclusion Keynote Advises Future Educators

In fourth grade Jonathan Mooney hid in the bathroom to avoid reading in front of the class because of his dyslexia. By fifth grade he was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). By sixth grade Mooney dropped out of school and contemplated suicide.

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Meet the Prof: Don Hones

Meet the Prof: Don Hones

The following faculty Q&A was submitted by the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Faculty Advocacy Committee, a committee of the Faculty Senate. Ava McCall, chair of the department of Curriculum and Instruction, wrote the introduction.

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COEHS students facilitate online learning environments

COEHS students facilitate online learning environments

Cairo, Egypt—known as one of the oldest cities in the world and currently a place of protest—is home to alumnus Kim Nerenhausen and his fifth grade class, who are being mentored over the Internet by University of Wisconsin Oshkosh students.

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Author of ‘The Short Bus’ to give keynote at Seeds of Inclusion conference

Author of ‘The Short Bus’ to give keynote at Seeds of Inclusion conference

As a child Jonathan Mooney’s teachers labeled him as severely learning disabled because he could not follow directions, sit still or read well. He feared he lost his chance to be a “normal kid” and, along with other kids facing similar challenges, was belittled daily.

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