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ECON 400 level course descriptions

ECON 403 Public Sector Econ (SS) - 3 credits (prerequisite: Economics 204 or 209 and Economics 206 or 208, with an average grade of C or better)
Economics of federal, state and local governments; analysis of the effects of expenditures, taxes and subsidies; intergovernmental fiscal relations; efficiency and decision making in the public sector.  Syllabi

ECON 410 International Capital Markets (SS) - 3 credits (prerequisite: Economics 204 or 209 and Economics 206 or 208, with an average grade of C or better)
This course analyzes the economic issues and impacts of capital movements among nations.  These issues include: open macroeconomic theory and policy, capital account imbalances, financial crises, exchange rate volatility, foreign direct investment, capital controls, monetary standards, emerging country impacts of capital mobility, monetary unions, and international regulatory regimes. Syllabi

ECON 420 International Trade and Finance (SS) - 3 credits
(prerequisite: Economics 204 or 209 and Economics 206 or 208, with an average grade of C or better)
Analysis of international trade, including the theory of free trade, the impact of trade barriers, and international trade organizations. Analysis of the international finance system, including the balance of payments, exchange markets, and exchange rate determination. Syllabi

ECON 426 Economics of Latin America (SS) - 3 credits
(prerequisite: Economics 206 or 208 and Economics 204 or 209 with a grade of C or better)
This course analyzes the economic issues surrounding the economic policies and economic development of Latin American countries.  We will examine the persistent barriers to economic development in Latin America, as well as the occasional success stories.  Economic principles will be used to understand the root balance of payments difficulties, exchange rate and debt crises, hyperinflation, dollarization, and geographical and income inequalities throughout the region.  Also, the course will evaluate Latin American development policies ranging from the import-substituting industrialization policies of the 1950's to 1970's to the market-oriented reforms of the 1980's to the present.  Aid policies and international monetary institution advice and plans will be examined. Syllabi

ECON 436 - Comparative Economics Systems (SS) - 3 credits
(prerequisite: Economics 204 or 209 and Economics 206 or 208 with an average grade of C or better)
An evaluation of existing and experimental economic systems in Europe, United States of America, transition economics, China and the Third World for their potential to meet anticipated future economic problems. Syllabi

ECON 437 Macroeconomic Forecasting and Policy Development - 1.5 credits
(prerequisite: Economics 204 or 209 and Economics 206 or 208; and Economics 210 or Math 301 with a grade of C or better in each class)
Students will learn how to forecast macroeconomic conditions. In doing so, students will examine how consumer and business practices affect, and are in turn affected by, the current conditions and outlook for the U.S. economy. Basic statistical skills necessary to forecast macroeconomic conditions will be taught. Students will analyze how the government's monetary policy practices and government decision-making is based on such macroeconomic forecasts. As a team, the students will present a recommended macroeconomic policy to a board of economists at the Chicago Federal Reserve Bank. Syllabi

ECON 460 (prior to Fall 2010, ECON 355)  Natural Res Econ (SS) - 3 credits
(prerequisite: Economics 204 or 209 and Economics 206 or 208, with an average grade of C or better, and completion of the mathematics requirement for economics majors)
An application of microeconomic principles to optimum use of land, water, energy, and other more specific resources. Alternative public policies are evaluated for the solution of resource allocation problems.

ECON 466 Industrial Organization - 3 credits (prerequisite: Economics 204 or 209 and Economics 206 or 208, with an average grade of C or better)
Regulatory and promotional policies and programs of the Federal Government affecting the operations of the market system.  Syllabi

ECON 471 Intro Math Econ (SS) - 3 credits (prerequisite: Economics 204 or 209 and Economics 206 or 208, and Economics 329 and 331, with a grade of B or better in each class, and completion of the mathematics requirement for economics majors and permission of the instructor)
The application of mathematical tools to economics with emphasis on the description and use of the tools; mathematical models of decision making and optimization. Dual level 471/671. Syllabi

ECON 472 Time Series Analysis & Forecasting - 3 credits (prerequisite: ECON 210 or MATH 301, with a grade of C or better)
This class introduces a variety of methods to analyze time-series data and generate statistical forecasts. Analytical techniques such as seasonal and weighted averaging, exponential smoothing and auto-regressive moving averages will be studied. Students will work with computer software applications of real world economic and business problems to aid in development of decision-making skills.  Syllabi

ECON 473 Economitric Methods (SS) - 3 credits (prerequisite: Economics 204 or 209; Economics 206 or 208; and Economics 210 or Math 301, with a grade of C or better in each class)
An introduction to the statistical regression techniques widely used by researchers in Economics and Business Finance. Single and multiple regression of time-series and cross sectional data. Dual level 473/673. Syllabi

ECON 474 Honors: Thesis (SS) - 1 credit (minimum; 3 credits (maximum) repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits (prerequisite: University Honors status and junior standing. Economics 206 or 208 and Economics 207 or 209 with a grade of "C" or better)
Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student's major field of study e.g. a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be 'Honors Thesis.' Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty.

ECON 499 Senior Seminar in Econ (SS) - 3 credits (prerequisite: Economics 204 or 209 and Economics 206 or 208 with a grade of C or better, Economics 329 and Economics 331 and a declared major in Economics)
A seminar in applied economics which focuses on selected current economic problems.