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Professional MBA Curriculum Change

We are pleased to announce that the UW Oshkosh College of Business approved a curriculum change to the Professional MBA path. Expected implementation is fall of 2017.

The new curriculum will eliminate foundation level courses as a prerequisite into the program while still offering a flexible format for students. Under the original 33-credit curriculum, students with insufficient academic business coursework were required to take up to 15 additional credits of foundation level coursework. Under the new 36-credit curriculum, a series of required tools courses have been embedded into the curriculum in order to prepare students for the core MBA courses.

The new streamlined curriculum will continue to be offered in online and onsite formats and will feature several new courses. The Strategic Context of Organizations (BUS 791), a required entry course into the program, will help students understand how each functional area of organizations contributes to planning, plan implementation, why all functional areas are interdependent and why thinking at the organizational level is essential to maximize organization performance and career enhancement. Select courses may be taken concurrently with BUS 791. Students will enroll in 4.5 elective credits by choosing from a variety of class offerings. The program will conclude with a Capstone Analysis of Organizations (BUS 799) course where students will demonstrate their mastery of the UW Oshkosh MBA Program learning goals and objectives. Emphases will continue to be offered in Health Care Management, Human Resource Management, International Business, Marketing, Management Information Systems and Project Management. We are currently working to update our website with the curriculum changes. In the meantime, the full curriculum can be viewed by clicking here.

Students can apply now for admission.

Please contact Kristi Cutts, associate director of admissions, at 920-424-3384 or by email at with any questions.

Young entrepreneurs compete for chance to win big money

by Carey Behnke

Twenty-five undergraduate student teams from universities across the United States have been selected to participate in “e-Fest,” a competition that will award more than $200,000 in grants and scholarships for the best undergraduate business ideas.

e-Fest will be held April 6-8 at the Schulze School in Minneapolis.

Two teams from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh’s Alta Resources Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEI) were chosen from a pool of more than 160 teams from 81 schools. To qualify, teams submitted seven-minute videos and slides describing their business ideas.

AbigailMerrillAbigail Merrill, who is still a senior at Oshkosh West High School, is earning six credits at UW Oshkosh this semester. Her presentation will unveil an app she began developing in 2016. Designed to help citizens navigate the political arena, the app In Our Hands, allows users to set up customized alerts or apply filters to drafted legislation. The end goal is to help citizens become better informed and more active in the legislative process.

“I am excited to be going to e-Fest, it will allow me to gain further support for the development of this app. I want to help citizens share their voice about the proposed changes or policies. After all, it is in our hands to hold our government accountable,” Merrill said.

Originally from Oak Creek, Dylan Parks ’17, and Brad Ploch ’17, came to UW Oshkosh with the intent of studying business. Parks majored in finance and Ploch majored in management with an emphasis in entrepreneurship and small business. While at UWO, they participated in the CEI accelerator program, which connects students interested in entrepreneurship to the resources (mentorship, consulting and capital) they need to pursue their business ideas.

26497384211_56b1a863b1_h“Our education at UW Oshkosh gave us the technical skills (financial forecasting, marketing, etc.) and, more importantly, the ability to find solutions to challenges that allow us to stand out from the competition,” Ploch said.

Upright Kids is their latest business venture that would provide affordable stand-up desks for elementary age kids. Research shows standing instead of sitting for prolonged periods of time can alleviate health risks associated with sedentary lifestyles. Although the concept of a standing desk isn’t new, Parks and Ploch set out to create an affordable solution for elementary schools. Upright Kids might be a way that schools or parents could purchase a solution that would allow kids to move more and sit less.  

“Going to e-Fest is an unbelievable opportunity for us to not only spread awareness about the issue and our mission but also for a chance to really make a huge leap forward in terms of capital and potential mentors and partners,” Parks said.

Both UWO teams also will have the opportunity to participate in the Innovation Challenge. Judges will shuffle participants into new teams and present them a challenge. The students must devise a business-based solution with a compelling value proposition and present by the end of the evening. The top three winning teams will be awarded scholarships.

Saturday the teams will pitch in groups of five, with the winners of each round advancing until the competition has been narrowed to the top five. The top three winners will walk away with monetary prices with additional grants going to their universities to support entrepreneurship education.

“Having not one but two teams heading to the e-Fest competition is an amazing achievement. UW Oshkosh is the only university (other than the host school) to have more than one team at this event, and most universities didn’t have any teams make the cut. This accomplishment exemplifies the power of our program and the tenacity of our student entrepreneurs,” said Jordan Rhodes ’12 and MBA ’16,  Alta Resources CEI director.

UW Oshkosh students assist Goodwill with surveys

by Laurie Schlosser

An opportunity to conduct customer surveys and to compile the data from hundreds of responses provided real-world experience for students from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh’s Business Success Center (BSC).

Leaders at Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin (NCW) were seeking information about their loyalty program and whether customers liked the program that generates earnings for purchases. Good Points members earn one point for every dollar spent and a $5 rebate is given when 100 points are earned.

Stephen Zich, leader of marketing for Goodwill (NCW) wondered if students could help survey customers at two stores.

“We wanted to see if the loyalty program was something customers liked and wanted,” Zich said. “We wanted to understand what type of messaging resonated with these customers. Is it value they see as the No. 1 reason to shop? Or is it the experience: the variety of items and uniqueness that gives a treasure hunt experience?”

Devin Matznick, a senior pre-med student at UW Oshkosh, did a number of “intercept”—or clipboard-style interviews at both sites. Some people, he said, were cranky or came up with excuses not to do the survey, but many others were happy to participate.

He said people expressed that they were happy about the way Goodwill helps people in the community.

The surveying experience he’s had in the Business Success Center is something Matznick believes will help him in a future career path. Last week, he was working in the BSC on a telephone survey for a Neenah insurance company.

“The skills can be applied, regardless of a career path,” he said, regarding the way students made connections with people and evoked the sharing of information for survey questions.

UW Oshkosh senior Jacob Clarke, a marketing intern at the BSC, manually typed a large amount of data from the Goodwill intercept surveys into an excel spread. A tedious process of data coding, but a real-life activity that would direct Goodwill NCW on its future marketing and direction.

Clarke worked to “cleanse” the data, entering each type of response to a specific column and investigated further if an entry didn’t make sense. A few responses were deemed unusable and had to be discarded.

“All decisions are based on data,” he said. “They can’t be arbitrary.”

Data analysis involved a process of determining what the data is showing. Most of that work was done by Assistant Professor Melissa Bublitz.

“When we asked open-ended questions like we did for Goodwill, it’s not always easy to put (responses) in a category, Bublitz said.

Clarke worked to make sense of the data and make sure it clearly conveyed what the customer said.

Satisfaction
Bublitz said the thrift store sector gained a lot of customers during the recession.

“Their goal is to keep those customers for the long-term,” she said.

Bublitz said Goodwill has very high satisfaction and loyalty ratings. People who enjoy the treasure hunt aspect tend to visit the stores more frequently as they search for something new. Loyalty card members also tend to shop more frequently than non-card customers.

People said they want to support a business with a mission of elevating people with challenges.

“Not having to buy new is socially acceptable,” Bublitz said. “. . . that is refreshing and for (Goodwill) is also an opportunity (with young people) to keep them interested.”

Goodwill is experimenting with the idea of e-commerce: selling items online.

Clarke said he learned a lot working with Bublitz. He enjoyed working on an actual project and ultimately helping a business be profitable. After graduation, he hopes to work for SC Johnson in his native Racine.

BSC Outreach Program Manager Mindie Boynton said beyond surveys done at Goodwill stores, students also sent surveys online.

She said interactions with people help students learn “soft skills” that are important in the work world. And students gain knowledge and experience working alongside faculty members, community leaders and business people.

The mission of the UW Oshkosh Business Success Center is to further the development of the university and the community by actively engaging university resources. Among the offerings are full-service intern support, survey success center assistance, consulting and customized training.

“Working with the UW Oshkosh Business Success Survey Center helps our organization stay in the mindset that it is important to keep a pulse on the customer’s behavior and expectations,” Goodwill’s Zich said.

The BSC is located in the  UW Oshkosh Alumni Welcome and Conference Center, 625 Pearl Ave., Suite 212. Visit bsc@uwosh.edu or call (920) 424-0833.

UW Oshkosh Executive MBA Not-for-Profit and Government Scholarship

The UW Oshkosh MBA Office has announced a new scholarship opportunity for individuals employed by not-for profit and government agencies. Up to three scholarships will be awarded in the amount of $8,925 toward the UW Oshkosh Executive MBA cohort beginning September 2017.
 
Selection criteria includes: employed by a non-profit, government or state agency; meet admission standards for the Executive MBA and complete the standard admission process; and complete the scholarship application.
 
The UW Oshkosh Executive MBA is completed in just sixteen months and is held on Saturdays at the Appleton Executive Education Center. It is a cohort style learning environment which allows for extensive peer interaction, rich discussions, and builds a powerful, influential network.
 
For more information contact the MBA Office at 800-633-1430.

UW Oshkosh students assist Goodwill with surveys

by Laurie Schlosser

An opportunity to conduct customer surveys and to compile the data from hundreds of responses provided real-world experience for students from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh’s Business Success Center (BSC).

Leaders at Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin (NCW) were seeking information about their loyalty program and whether customers liked the program that generates earnings for purchases. Good Points members earn one point for every dollar spent and a $5 rebate is given when 100 points are earned.

Stephen Zich, leader of marketing for Goodwill (NCW) wondered if students could help survey customers at two stores.

“We wanted to see if the loyalty program was something customers liked and wanted,” Zich said. “We wanted to understand what type of messaging resonated with these customers. Is it value they see as the No. 1 reason to shop? Or is it the experience: the variety of items and uniqueness that gives a treasure hunt experience?”

Devin Matznick, a senior pre-med student at UW Oshkosh, did a number of “intercept”—or clipboard-style interviews at both sites. Some people, he said, were cranky or came up with excuses not to do the survey, but many others were happy to participate.

He said people expressed that they were happy about the way Goodwill helps people in the community.

The surveying experience he’s had in the Business Success Center is something Matznick believes will help him in a future career path. Last week, he was working in the BSC on a telephone survey for a Neenah insurance company.

“The skills can be applied, regardless of a career path,” he said, regarding the way students made connections with people and evoked the sharing of information for survey questions.

UW Oshkosh senior Jacob Clarke, a marketing intern at the BSC, manually typed a large amount of data from the Goodwill intercept surveys into an excel spread. A tedious process of data coding, but a real-life activity that would direct Goodwill NCW on its future marketing and direction.

Clarke worked to “cleanse” the data, entering each type of response to a specific column and investigated further if an entry didn’t make sense. A few responses were deemed unusable and had to be discarded.

“All decisions are based on data,” he said. “They can’t be arbitrary.”

Data analysis involved a process of determining what the data is showing. Most of that work was done by Assistant Professor Melissa Bublitz.

“When we asked open-ended questions like we did for Goodwill, it’s not always easy to put (responses) in a category, Bublitz said.

Clarke worked to make sense of the data and make sure it clearly conveyed what the customer said.

Satisfaction
Bublitz said the thrift store sector gained a lot of customers during the recession.

“Their goal is to keep those customers for the long-term,” she said.

Bublitz said Goodwill has very high satisfaction and loyalty ratings. People who enjoy the treasure hunt aspect tend to visit the stores more frequently as they search for something new. Loyalty card members also tend to shop more frequently than non-card customers.

People said they want to support a business with a mission of elevating people with challenges.

“Not having to buy new is socially acceptable,” Bublitz said. “. . . that is refreshing and for (Goodwill) is also an opportunity (with young people) to keep them interested.”

Goodwill is experimenting with the idea of e-commerce: selling items online.

Clarke said he learned a lot working with Bublitz. He enjoyed working on an actual project and ultimately helping a business be profitable. After graduation, he hopes to work for SC Johnson in his native Racine.

BSC Outreach Program Manager Mindie Boynton said beyond surveys done at Goodwill stores, students also sent surveys online.

She said interactions with people help students learn “soft skills” that are important in the work world. And students gain knowledge and experience working alongside faculty members, community leaders and business people.

The mission of the UW Oshkosh Business Success Center is to further the development of the university and the community by actively engaging university resources. Among the offerings are full-service intern support, survey success center assistance, consulting and customized training.

“Working with the UW Oshkosh Business Success Survey Center helps our organization stay in the mindset that it is important to keep a pulse on the customer’s behavior and expectations,” Goodwill’s Zich said.

The BSC is located in the  UW Oshkosh Alumni Welcome and Conference Center, 625 Pearl Ave., Suite 212. Visit bsc@uwosh.edu or call (920) 424-0833.