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Courses Offered

Course offerings vary by high school. Keep in mind your school is not limited to the courses listed below, these courses have just been approved by the Departments to be taught for CAPP. With a qualified adjunct teacher and course approval; CAPP can offer additional courses that work for your high school.

Course descriptions from Undergraduate Bulletin.

Art

  • 101 - Elements of Studio Art ( 3 credits)
    This course is designed to give non-Art Majors experiences in a variety of 2D and 3D Studio Art Media and techniques in an effort to expand their knowledge, appreciation, and understanding of Art and Design within the context of the Liberal arts. (For non-Art majors and Minors only.)

  • 105 - Understanding the Arts (3 credits)
    Providing the student with an education that increases his/her understanding and appreciation of the visual arts.

Biology

  • 105 - Biological Concepts - Unity (4 credits)
    An introduction to the biological sciences. Addresses phenomena common to a diversity of life forms. Biological organization, cell biology, processing energy, genetics, evolution. (3 + 2)

  • 211 – Human Anatomy (3 credits)
    A study of the fundamental structure and organization of the organs and systems of the human body. Prerequisite: “C” or better in Biology 105 or equivalent (Primarily for Physical education and nursing students). (2+2)

  • 212 – Human Physiology (4 credits)
    Structure/function relationships of the healthy human body, on the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ-system levels. Primarily for students in secondary education, nursing, and physical education programs. Prerequisite: Biology 211 with a grade of C or better. (3+2)

Business

  • 198 - Introduction to Business (3 credits)
    The course is designed as an introductory course for all students interested in learning more about business. Students will be exposed to many different aspects of the world of business. A primary objective of the course is to broaden both the interests and horizons of early level university students toward understanding the dynamics of business and  business careers.  Lectures, readings, presentations by guest speakers, videos, etc. will be utilized to facilitate student's learning.

  • 231 - Personal Finance (3 credits)
    A study of the major financial decisions encountered by individuals.  Subjects covered are" budgeting, use of credit, automobile and consumer durables, insurance, the housing decision, taxes, retirement planning, estate transfer and investments. Each subject is analyzed within the context of a comprehensive framework of personal financial planning. (May not be taken as a major elective by business students.)

Chemistry

  • 105 - General Chemistry I (5 credits)
    This is the first semester of the one-year Chemistry 105/106 course sequence, which is specifically designed to meet the needs of science majors and preprofessional students. Topics covered include: atomic theory, atomic and electronic structure, chemical bonding, mole concept, stoichiometry, state of matter, formulas and equations, solutions and colloids. 
    Prerequisites: Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Math 104 or completion/placement of any higher math course. 
    Recommended: A previous course in High School or College Chemistry.  
    (4 + 2)

  • 106 - General Chemistry II  (5 credits)
    This is the second semester of the one-year Chemistry 105/106 course sequence, which is specifically designed to meet the needs of science majors and preprofessional students. Topics covered in Chemistry 106 include: molecular structure, chemistry of metals and selected nonmetals, intermolecular forces, chemical equilibrium.  
    Prerequisite: Chemistry 105 with a grade of C or better and either completion of Math 104 with a grade of C or better, completion/placement of any higher math course. (4+3) (Fall - Spring)

Communication

  • 111 - Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3 credits)
    Introduction to theory and practice of communicating in interpersonal and public speaking settings.

Computer Science

  • 221 - Object-Oriented Design and Programming I (3 credits)
    A first course in problem solving, software design, and computer programming using the Java language. Problem solving/software design techniques will be drawn from: flow charts, pseudo code, structure charts, and class diagrams. Data structures and algorithms include: arrays, characters strings, searching, and sorting. Programming topics include: data types assignment statements, standard input/output, selection, repetition, functions/methods, parameters, scope of identifiers, data file input/output, recursion, and simple GUIs. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in Math 104 or Math 108 or Math 206 or Computer Science 142, or qualifying for Math 171 via the Mathematics Placement Exam.

Economics

  • 106 - General Economics (3 credits)
    Analysis of some of the major current issues in the American economy undertaken after a historical survey of the emergence of modern economic institutions. Not open to students with either Economics 206, 207, 208, or 209.

Engineering

  • 101 - Fundamentals of Engineering Technology (2 credits)
    This course is designed to equip engineering technology students with the necessary tools and background information to prepare them to be a successful student as well as a successful practicing engineering technologist. Topics covered in this course include ethics, project management, team work, working with data, creating presentations, engineering design and a thorough understanding of the engineering profession.

English

  • 101 - College English I (3 credits)
    A Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar for university students with 30 or more credits and for CAPP students designed primarily to develop the understanding and skills needed to read and write intelligently at the college level. Some attention is given to responsible handling of research materials.  Successful completion of English 101 fulfills the first level of the General Education composition requirement. Successful completion will fulfill the Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar requirement. Students who have earned credit for WBIS 188 may not take English 101. Students cannot earn credit for both English 101 and WBIS.

  • 211 - British Literature I (3 credits)
    A study of English literature from its beginnings to 1800. Prerequisite: Any Writing Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188,) or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

  • 212 - British Literature II (3 credits)
     A study of English literature from 1800 to present. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

  • 213 - American Literature I (3 credits)
    A study of American literature from its beginnings to the Civil War.  
    Prerequisite: Any Writing Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

  • 214 - American Literature II (3 credits)
    A study of American literature from the Civil War to 1950. 
    Prerequisite: Any Writing Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

  • 224 - Women in Literature (3 credits)
     
    Representations of women and female experiences in literature. A variety of genres and historical periods may be covered from American, British and/or colonial literatures. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188) or English 101 or English 110. Cross-listed: English 224/Women's Studies 224. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Writing assignments will be required.

  • 225 - Modern British Literature (3 credits)
    A study of works by 20th Century British writers. Primarily for non-majors.  
    Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS-188) or English 101 or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

  • 226 - Modern American Literature (3 credits)
    A study of works by post-19th century American writers.  primarily for non-majors.  Prerequisite: Any Writing Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188) or English 101 or English 110.  Writing assignments will be required.

  • 227 - Modern World Literature (3 credits)
    A study of works by modern world authors, in English or English translations.  This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Recommended for non-majors.
    Prerequisite: Any Writing- Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188) or English 101 or English 110.  Writing assignments will be required.

  • 231 - Literature and Film (3 credits)
    A study of some significant literary works in conjunction with their film adaptations to compare artistic representations. 
    Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188) or English 101 or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

French

  • 248 - Fourth Semester French for CAP Program (5 credits)
    An intensive two-semester course taught at high schools affiliated with the CAP Program featuring development of intermediate conversational skills and reading skills through the study of works of French literature and other appropriate materials. This course is a substitute for French 204 and 208.

  • 312 - Advanced French Grammar (5 credits)
    French 312, Advanced French Grammar. Prerequisties: French 204, or 248 with a grade of B or better.

Geography

  •  102 - World Regional Geography (3 credits)

A study of the various interrelationships of cultural and physical phenomena as exemplified by major world regions. Intended for those who seek to enhance their knowledge of important world regions. (Not open to students with credit in upper level Regional Geography).

  • 111 - Human Geography (3 credits
    The distribution and significance of major elements of culture, such as languages, religions, and political systems are examined, along with processes that shape cultural landscapes.

    Geology

    • 102 - Physical Geology (1-4 credits)
      The nature and origin of rocks and the study of geological processes such as erosion, earthquakes, mountain building and plate tectonics. Laboratories illustrate geological methods of scientific inquiry by studies of minerals, rocks, rock deformation, topographic and geologic maps, and by a field trip.  Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: Geology 102, 110, or 150. (3+2) Special fee: $5.00 will be charged.

    German

    • 248 - Fourth Semester German for CAP Program (5 credits)
      An intensive two-semester course taught at high schools affiliated with the CAP Program featuring development of advanced intermediate conversational skills and reading skills through the study of works of German literature and other appropriate materials. This course is a substitute for German 204 and 208.

    • 304 - Advanced Composition and Conversation II (5 credits)
      Development of written and oral facility using materials in German civilization. May be taken before German 30l. Prerequisite: German 204, consent of instructor or Placement Test or German 248 with a grade of B or better.

    Health Education

    • 106 - Personal Health and Wellness (3 credits
      Self-direction of health behavior. Mental health, drugs, disease, and sexuality with emphasis upon the relationship of the individual to the community.

    History

    • 102 - Modern Civilization (3 credits)
      Survey of development of Civilizations, including the high Renaissance through Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, and the emergence of nationalism and democracy to recent times.

    • 201 - United States History to 1877 (3 credits)
      Survey of United States history from voyages of discovery and early European settlement in North America, through colonial rivalries, struggle of English colonies for independence, expansion and development of young republic, and crisis of Civil War and Reconstruction.

    • 202 - Modern United States History Since 1877 (3 credits)
      Survey of United States history from 1877; emergence of a modern industrial state, expansion abroad. First and Second World Wars, and role as a great power.

    Japanese

    • 248 - Fourth Semester Japanese for CAP Program (5 credits)
      An intensive two-semester course taught at high schools affiliated with the CAP Program featuring development of intermediate conversational skills and reading and writing skills through the study of the Japanese language and other appropriate materials. This course is a substitute for Japanese 211.  Prerequisite: Equivalent of Japanese 210.

    • 310 - Advanced Japanese I (5 credits)
      Japanese 310 is the fifth semester course of modern Japanese. The main objective of this course is the continuous development of the four skills of communication. This course helps students expand their structural as well as sociolinguistic knowledge of the language. Prerequisite: Japanese 211 or consent of instructor, or 248 with grade of B or better.

    Journalism

    • 141 - Introduction to Journalism and Mass Communication (3 credits)
      Introduction to the process and effects of mass communication, mass media industries, the functions of the mass media in society and issues that mass communicators face in their careers. It also covers specialization in the media, globalization of the media, fragmented audiences and new media and technology.

    Kinesiology

    • 104 - AED, CPR, and First Aid (1 credit)
      This course will prepare students to use an Automated External Defibrillator, perform Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, and First Aid. Special fees may apply.

    Mathematics

    • 108 - Pre-Calculus  (5 credits)
      A functional approach to college algebra and trigonometry. Polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, circular and trigonometric functions.  Recommended for all students who place at this level and who expect to take the Mathematics 171 - Mathematics 172 calculus sequence. May not receive credit for both Mathematics 104 and 108. 
      Prerequisite: Mathematics 103 with a grade of C or better or placement.

    • 109 - Elementary Statistics (3 credits)
      Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, sampling distributions, basic problems of statistical inference including estimation and confidence intervals, tests of hypothesis and regression. 
      Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 with a grade of C or better or placement.

    • 171 - Calculus I (4 credits)
      Real valued functions of a single variable. Concept of derivative, anti-derivative, and definite integral. Differentiation and applications, including optimization and curve-sketching. Emphasis on problem solving, approximation, data analysis, visualization. A graphics programmable calculator is required. 
      Prerequisite:  Mathematics 108 or 104 and 106 with grade(s) of C or better or 4 years of college preparatory mathematics and a satisfactory score on a placement examination.

    • 172 - Calculus II (4 credits)
      Definite integration and applications, several techniques of integration, approximation, and improper integrals. Numerical differential equations, slope fields, Euler's method, and mathematical modeling. Taylor and Fourier Series.  A graphics programmable calculator is required. 
      Prerequisite: Mathematics 171 and a grade of C or better.

    • 273 - Calculus III (4 credits)
      Vectors in two and three dimensions and vector functions. Multivariate differential and integral calculus, partial derivatives and multiple integrals.  Line and surface integrals. 
      Prerequisite: Mathematics 172 and a grade of C or better.

    Music

    • 102 - Theory of Music for the General Student (3 credits)
      A course designed to acquaint the non-majors or non-minors in music with the basic materials which make up the art of musical sound.

    • 219 Music and Culture: Optional Content (3 credits)
      A study of the music of various historical and/or contemporary cultures. Topics may include music of western and/or non-western cultures, specific composers, genres, cultural topics. or historical eras in western music. This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with signature of department chair.

    Philosophy

    • 105 - Ethics (3 credits)
      Analysis of the principal theories of the ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined.

    • 109 - Intro to Philosophy (3 credits)
      A survey of some of the perennial problems of the human enterprise; the nature of reality, of truth, of beauty, or ideal political and social relationships, and of the good life; solutions to these problems offered by the best known Greek, medieval, and modern philosophers.

    Physical Education

    • 105 The Active Lifestyle (2 credits)
      A contemporary examination of the effects of lifestyle, wellness, and health promotion on the individual. Instruction in procedures for self-evaluation as well as an individualized exercise program for the development of health fitness. Participation in a planned program of aerobic activity is required. This course meets the two unit (cr.) physical education requirement.

    • 221 Intermediate Swimming (2 credits)
      Concentration on stroke development and safety in the water will be emphasized. Lifeguard certification is possible with successful completion of this course. Special fees may apply.

    Physics/Astronomy

    • 103 - The Solar System (4 credits
      The astronomer's understanding of the earth, moon and planets. Explores the basic nature of science and the scientific method. Intended for non-science majors and science majors having an interest in astronomy. Prerequisite: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam (3+2) (or High School Algebra II)

    • 104 - Stars, Galaxies and the Universe (4 credits
      Universe beyond the solar system. Methods of science applied to classification of stars, galaxies, nebulae and exotic objects such as pulsars, quasars and black holes. Intended for non-science majors and science majors having an interest in astronomy. May be taken to satisfy the general education lab science requirement. Prerequisites: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam. (3+2) (or High School Algebra II)

    • 107 - General Physics I ( 5 credits)
      A survey of mechanics and properties of matter. Recommended for liberal arts majors and pre-professionals. Not recommended for physics majors and minors and pre-engineers.
      Prerequisite: Mathematics 106, Mathematics 108 or equivalent. (4+2)

    • 108 - General Physics (5 credits)
      A survey of waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear radiation.  Recommended for liberal arts majors and pre-professionals. Not recommended for physics majors and minors.
      Prerequisite: Physics 107. (4+2)

    • 109 - General Physics (5 credits)
      A survey of mechanics, sound, and heat providing a background for advanced work in these fields. Recommended for students in pre-engineering and majors in physics, chemistry, or mathematics. 
      Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in or previous completion of Mathematics 171. (4+2)

    • 113 - The Solar System - no lab (3 credits
      The astronomer's understanding of the earth, moon and planets. Explores the basic nature of science and the scientific method. May be used to satisfy laboratory science requirement only if Physics 123 is taken during a later term. Credit may not be earned for both Physics 113 and Physics 103. Prerequisites: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics placement Exam. (3+0) (or High School Algebra II)

    • 114 - Stars, Galaxies and the Universe -no lab (3 credits
      Identical to Physics 104 except no laboratory experience is included. May be used to satisfy laboratory science requirement only if Physics 124 is taken during a later term. Credit may not be earned for both Physics 114 and Physics 104. Prerequisite: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam. (3+0) (or High School Algebra II)

    • 123 - Solar System Laboratory (1 credit)
      Laboratory component of the Solar System, Physics 103. Completes four units (crs.) applicable toward laboratory science requirement when taken following Physics 113. Prerequisite: Physics 113. (0+2) 

    • 124 - Stars, Galaxies and the Universe Laboratory (1 credit)
      Laboratory component of Cosmic Evolution, Physics 104. Completes four units (crs.) applicable toward the laboratory science requirement when taken following Physics 114. Prerequisite: Physics 114. (0+2)

    Political Science

    • 105 - American Government and Politics (3 credits)
      Organization, principles and actual working of the American National Government in all its branches.

    • 115 -  International Politics (3 credits)
      Development of the nation-state system; role of the great powers, the struggle for power; settlement of disputes; diplomacy, the quest for law, nationalism, contemporary problems.

    Psychology

    • 101 - General Psychology (3 credits)
      A beginning course in psychology designed to provide an understanding of contemporary approaches to human behavior and to lay the foundation for additional work in psychology. Students must complete a course research requirement. Credit cannot be received for both Psychology 101 and 110 or Psychology 101 and 104.

    Radio/TV/Film

    • 114 Introduction to Media Aesthetics (3 credits)
      The study of conventions and creative strategies through which a mass media communicator expresses thought and emotion. In its exploration of dynamic audio/visual communication, the course will analyze film excerpts, broadcast segments, scripts, art, photography, and influential theory that has impacted production.

    • 120 Introduction to Audio/Radio (3 credits)
      This course is designed to cover basic theory and techniques of audio production, as well as introductory radio station practices. The course consists of lectures, as well as studio session featuring equipment demonstrations and production exercises in a professional environment. This course also includes experience on the air at the university’s radio station, WRST-FM.

    • 250 Introduction to Visual Media (3 credits)
      This course introduces students to basic theory and practices related to visual media, including television station operations, studio and field production, camera usage, and editing.

      Prerequisites: RTF 110 & RTF 114 or COMM 151 & COMM 201

    Sociology

    • 101 - Introductory Sociology (3 credits)
      Orientation to the sociological perspective. Basic sociological concepts, research procedures, processes of human interaction, and social institutions.

    Spanish

    • 248 - Fourth Semester Spanish for CAP Program (5 credits)
      An intensive two-semester course taught at high schools affiliated with the CAP Program featuring development of advanced intermediate conversational skills and reading skills through the study of works of Spanish and Spanish American literature and other appropriate materials. This course is a substitute for Spanish 204 and 208.

    • 312 - Advanced Spanish Grammar (5 credits)
      Thorough and specific survey of advanced grammatical principles with intensive examination of syntax and of constituents of the Spanish utterance.  Prerequisite: Spanish 204, or 248 with a grade of B or better.

    Theatre

    • 161 - Introduction to Theatre (3 credits)
      A survey of drama as an integral element in human society in its cultural aspects, intended to stimulate and develop an appreciation for drama as literature and theatre. Meets the Humanities requirement for General Education.

     

    Online Courses

    Biology

    • 211 - Human Anatomy (3 credits)
      A study of the fundamental structure and organization of the organs and systems of the human body. 
      Prerequisite: "C" or better in Biology 105 or equivalent.  (Primarily for physical education and nursing students).

    Economics

    • 106 - General Economics (3 credits)
      Analysis of some of the major current issues in the American economy undertaken after a historical survey of the emergence of modern economic institutions. Not open to students with either Economics 206, 207, 208, or 209.

    English

    • 213 - American Literature I (3 credits)
      A study of American literature from its beginnings to the Civil War.  
      Prerequisite: Any Writing Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

    Kinesiology

    • 105 - The Active Lifestyle (2 credits)
      A contemporary examination of the effects of lifestyle, wellness, and health promotion on the individual. Instruction in procedures for self-evaluation as well as an individualized exercise program for the development of health fitness. Participation in a planned program of aerobic activity is required. This course meets the two unit (cr.) physical education requirement.

    • 170 - Medical Terminology (1 credit)
      This course will introduce the prospective athletic training student to terminology utilized in upper level coursework and healthcare settings.  
      Prerequisite: Open to students with a major or minor in the Department of Kinesiology.

    Mathematics

    • 109 - Elementary Statistics (3 credits)
      Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, sampling distributions, basic problems of statistical inference including estimation and confidence intervals, tests of hypothesis and regression. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 with a grade of C or better or placement.
    • 171 - Calculus I (4 credits)
      Real valued functions of a single variable. Concept of derivative, anti-derivative, and definite integral. Differentiation and applications, including optimization and curve-sketching. Emphasis on problem solving, approximation, data analysis, visualization. A graphics programmable calculator is required. Prerequisite:  Mathematics 108 or 104 and 106 with grade(s) of C or better or 4 years of college preparatory mathematics and a satisfactory score on a placement examination.

    • 172 - Calculus II (4 credits)
      Definite integration and applications, several techniques of integration, approximation, and improper integrals. Numerical differential equations, slope fields, Euler's method, and mathematical modeling. Taylor and Fourier Series.  A graphics programmable calculator is required. Prerequisite: Mathematics 171 and a grade of C or better.

    Political Science

    • 105 - American Government and Politics (3 credits)
      Organization, principles and actual working of the American National Government in all its branches.

    Psychology

    • 101 - General Psychology (3 credits)
      A beginning course in psychology designed to provide an understanding of contemporary approaches to human behavior and to lay the foundation for additional work in psychology. Students must complete a course research requirement. Credit cannot be received for both Psychology 101 and 110 or Psychology 101 and 104.

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    Course descriptions are taken from the UW Oshkosh Undergraduate Bulletin.

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