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The Rebuilding of Haiti: A Journey Through Pictures.

Image Forward Motion by dollha26 — last modified Nov 22, 2010 11:23 AM
Despite the devastation wrought by the January 12, 2010 earthquake, the people of Haiti maintain their forward momentum. This picture represents the strength of the Haitian people to keep moving forward, to rebuild their lives, to maintain a legacy of strength for their children and future generations. This picture is especially representative of their irrepressible strength and perseverance since the man shown is pulling a car uphill.
Image Hospice St. Joseph by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:06 AM
Remainder of Hospice St. Joseph in Lower Delmas, Port-au-Prince.
Image Cresua neighborhood of Port-au-Prince. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:07 AM
Randomness of the earthquake's destruction evidence by destroyed house adjacent to houses that are still standing.
Image Removal of rubble by hand. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:08 AM
USAID workers remove rubble by hand. Eleven months after the earthquake, much of the rubble remains. Bureaucratic inefficencies still tie up much of the money intended for relief and rebuilding efforts. The sheer devastation hampers much of the efforts, as well. As a result of these and many more factors, the majority of the rubble has to be removed by hand.
Image La Boule sand mine. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:09 AM
Many of the concrete blocks used in construction was from this mine. This low-quality sand used for construction was part of the reason why many houses collapsed. Despite this, many homes are still being built using La Boule sand.This photo was taken during October 2010, ten months after the earthquake.
Image Concrete blocks from the La Boule sand mine. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:11 AM
Despite the poor quality of the La Boule sand, concrete blocks made from this sand is still being used. This photo was taken October 2010, ten months after the earthquake.
Image Marketplace in Port-au-Prince. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:13 AM
Even after the devastating earthquake, commerce continues throughout the affected areas of Haiti.
Image The ups and downs of charcoal. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:14 AM
The commerce of charcoal has an up and down side. On one hand, people are engaging in commerce, maintaining a functioning economy. On the downside, this charcoal is from trees which contributes to deforestation.
Image Researchers in Haiti. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:15 AM
Team of researchers arriving in Port-au-Prince.
Image International cooperation. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:16 AM
International team compose of members from the University of Central Florida and the Université de Fondwa and Nouvelle Grand' Anse, Haiti.
Image Mobile communications study. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:17 AM
Study of mobile communication as an aspect disaster relief and interagency cooperation baed on field surveys. Places indicated by red arrows (Port-au-Prince, Leogane, Jacmel, Fondwe, and Jeremie) indicate where the surveys were conducted.
Image NGOs in Haiti. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:17 AM
Locations of Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs) in Haiti. In all, there are over 10,000 NGOs operating there. However, the lack of oversight and sparse coordination has led to great challenges to the response and recovery process.
Image Digicell Haiti. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:18 AM
Digicell Haiti, the largest cell phone provider in Haiti. Digicell was part of the survey conducted by Dr. Meehan and his team.
Image The essential work of local government. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:19 AM
Deputy mayor of Leogone. Each circled area on the aerial map represented assistance provided by local governmental. Due to Haiti's lack of a strong national government, much of the recovery and relief efforts have been coordinated and provided by local governments.
Image The essential work of the people. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:21 AM
Grassroots peasent associations, such as this one near Jacmel, participated in mass meetings to complete the communication survey.
Image Input is essential. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:22 AM
Group from Université de Nouvelle Grand' Anse participate in the survey. Over 220 surveys were compiled as a way to assess how cellular services were effected by the earthquake and performance of the various NGOs.
Image Haitian cuisine. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 08:23 AM
Haiti's wonderful food. Grilled snapper, plantins, and Piklis (Haitian coleslaw).
Image Business Thrives. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 10:31 AM
Even admist the rubble of Port-au-Prince, businesses thrive, such as this barber shop. About 1.3 million people live in IDP (Internally Displaced Peoples) tent cities. All of the services that can be found in a city of 30,000 to 60,000 people can be found in camps such as these.
Image Life continues. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 10:43 AM
Even though Haiti was devastated by the January 2010 earthquake, not all of the country was affected. Life still goes on as before. Buildings and homes still stand in areas unaffected by the earthquake, as shown by this 200-year-old gingerbread house in Jeremie, on the northern part of the southern peninsula of Haiti.
Image Stunned but moving forward. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 10:50 AM
Ten months after the earthquake people are still coming to grips with the reality around them. Some people are stunned, as shown by the man on the second floor, but they continue to make the most of their lives and contine moving forward.
Image The machinery of rebuilding. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 10:53 AM
This backhoe removed rubble from one of the streets of Port-au-Prince as people continue their daily lives.
Image Thriving agriculture. by dollha26 — last modified Nov 29, 2010 10:58 AM
Even in the cities, urban cultivation continues on median strips and anywhere crops can be grown. This crop is one of many throughout Haiti's countryside.
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